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Full text of "Home Missionary, The (May 1887-April 1888)"

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ome Missionary. 




MAY, 1887. - 



CONTENTS. 



THAT DEBT IS KILLED 1 

THE SARATOGA MEETING 2 

Y. P. S. C. E 3 

PILGRIM" ON J UIS OLD TRACK 6 

A WAY-UP. PARISH 7 

FRUIT.-I 10 

WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT 12 

. W Words from^Women 12 

Our Young Ladies 14 

OUR YOUNG PEOPLE 15 

Letter No. 8 16 

That •' Missionary Penny " 16 



Questions 17 

Banner State this Month 17 

By-laws of the Willing Helpers 17 

The Work at Hand.— Ill 18 

Our Letter Box / 

AM. COL. AND EDUCATION SOC... 20 

MISSIONARY BOXES 21 

WOMAN'S FUND FOR FOREIGN 

WORK 22 

CHILDREN'S BOHEMIAN FUND .... 22 

HOME MISSION CIRCLES 22 

MISSIONARY APPOINTMENTS 23 

RECEIPTS 23 



Vol. LX. No.- 1. 



NEW YORK. 
AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 

Bible House, Astob Place. 



SIXTY CENTS A TEAK, IN ADVANCE, POSTAGE PAID. 



THE 



Home Missionary 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 



APRIL, 1888. 



Go, Preach the Gospel. — Mark xvi. 15. 

How shall they Preach, except they be sent "i—Rom. x.^15. 



VOL. LX. 



NEW YORK: 

AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

BIBLE HOUSE, ASTOR PLACE. 

1888. 



Tne Independent Press 

SEW YOItK. 



33465 

THE HOME MISSIONARY. 

Go Pkeach the Gospel Mark xvi. 15. 

How shall they preach except they be sknt ? Horn. x. 15. 



VOL. LX. MAY, 1887. No. 1. 



THAT DEBT IS KILLED. 

That debt which grew to be $52,000, as to which the first outcry on 
these pages was uttered in The Home Missionary for August last, and 
has been kept up in every number since ; that debt which has so long 
been a familiar topic in the religious papers, in circulars, leaflets, private 
and official letters, in missionary concerts, church prayer-meetings, 
ministerial associations, and, later, in gatherings of the Y. P. S. C. E.; 
that debt which for months has had so large a place in petitions in the 
church, at the family altar, and in the closet — that debt is killed. 

Who killed it ? Our Heavenly Father, from whose hand and heart 
cometh every good thing. Praised be his name ! How did he kill it? By 
breathing into the hearts of thousands of his people the conviction that the 
debt ought to die, and so moving and directing their hands as to give it its 
death-blow. Look at the crowded columns of " Rsceipts in March," a 
few pages further on. Count the number of individual offerings in that 
month ; then those of Sunday-schools, sewing circles, children's and 
youth's mission bands, Young Peoples' Societies of Christian Endeavor, 
and other organizations. Guess how many willing hands are repre- 
sented. See from how many widely scattered homes they come. Mark the 
difference between the greatest and the least sum given. See how many 
small offerings help to make up this great total of $70,168.39 for the month, 
$56,570.11 of it from living givers — the largest amount ever so received 
in one month since the Society began its work. There are generous sums 
from the faithful Auxiliaries, representing a great multitude of helpers 
in those States ; there are some large gifts from those whom the Lord 
has trusted with wealth ; there is nearly $6,000 from 194 branches of 
the lively young people wide a/wake for Christian Endeavor. But there 
are many more small but precious offerings of ministers, home and 
foreign missionaries, with their wives and children ; of missionaries' 
widows, invalids, children scarcely more than infants, and veterans of 
more than ninety-six years. Seven dollars were the entire savings of a 
boy taken early from earth, given by his parents for the use he would 
have made of it. Five dollars represent "Little Robbie's Money," the 
wenty-five cents he had stored up for future use. When he had been 



2 TIiE HOME MISSIONARY. May, 

"three years in heaven" those identical coins, with many tears and 
prayers, were placed in the home missionary collection of a New Hamp- 
shire church. In the hands of a volunteer executor here they have 
quietly grown to these five dollars. Possibly they may yet grow to 
more. 

That debt is killed. It is a good thing to give thanks unto the 
Lord for this great mercy. But, being dead, that debt yet speaketh. 
Hearken, and it may teach us several things: (1.) To trust the Lord. 
He loves this cause, and will take care of it. (2.) To trust his true peo- 
ple. They too love this cause, and will work, give, and pray for it 
when they really know and feel its claims. (3.) To appreciate the power 
of individual effort. Many of these remittances are the fruit of one man's, 
one woman's, or one child's work in a parish, Sunday-school, day school, 
social circle, sewing or reading society, family, or Y. P. S. C. E. The 
one Strong hand that wrote "Our Country " has brought in not a few of 
these thousands. (4.) We may learn the wisdom of giving so systemati- 
cally and freely as to prevent another debt. Since the money will sure- 
ly be given, and I shall surely give my part, why not give it now — and 
enough of it ? (5.) We may learn what might be, if every pastor and 
every member of our churches and other sources of spiritual power 
were of like spirit with these. Is the time coming one day — does it 
hasten ? — when all shall be, in their spirit of consecration, as the Lord's 
best are now. (Zech. xiv, 20.) 



THE SARATOGA MEETING. 



The Sixty-first Annual Meeting of the American Home Missionary 
Society will be held in the Methodist Church, Saratoga Springs, N. Y , 
commencing on Tuesday evening, June 7th, 1887, with the annual ser- 
mon by Rev. Frederick A. Noble, D.D., of Chicago, 111. There will be 
three sessions — morning, afternoon and evening, on Wednesday and 
Thursday, June 8th and 9th. 

The President of the Society, Rev. Julius H. Seelye, D.D., of Am- 
herst College, is expected to preside and deliver an address on Wednes- 
day morning. The meeting of Wednesday evening will doubtless be of pe- 
culiar interest. The committee selected at the last meeting in relation 
to the appointment of a secretary for the work in cities, will make then- 
report. The same committee was appointed by the National Council to 
consider the general subject of evangelization. In connection with their 
report brief addresses may be expected from Dr. Lyman Abbott, Dr. 
J. G. Johnson, Dr. Josiah Strong, Dr. J. G. Roberts, Dr. Geo. F. Pen- 
tecost and others. 

The women will hold their meeting, as usual, on Wednesday after- 
noon. For other particulars in reference to speakers, etc., our readers 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 3 

are referred to tlie religious papers. In these papers will also be pub- 
lished tli3 special term3 given by the different hotels and boarding 
houses, and the arrangements made with railroads and steamboat lines 
for reduced fares. 

This anniversai-y gathering at Saratoga has taken its place among 
the great feasts of our Congregational Israel. It is expected that the 
meeting this year will equal, if not surpass, in interest those that have 
preceded it. In all probability the meeting next year will be at the 
West. Let all the friends of Home Missions rally at Saratoga and make 
the approaching anniversary the best of the series ! 



Resignations. —Rev. L. P. Rose, for thirteen years Superintendent 
for the State of Indiana, has felt impelled to resign his office. Mr. Rose 
has served the State and the Society long and well, and will take with 
him the undivided respect of his brethren, and the gratitude of the 
churches. 

Rev. D. L. Leonard, after a service of six years in the trying field of 
Utah, has resigned his superintendency. Hi3 administration has been 
marked by wisdom and energy ; and by as large a measure of success 
as could be reasonably expected. Mr Leonard's study of the Mormon 
problem has been particularly fruitful, and his articles for the news- 
paper and periodical press have interested and enlightened many 
readers both East and West. 



Y. P. S. C. E. 

To the Y. P. S. C. E., JVorth Congregational Church, Springfield, 
Mass.: 

From Kansas. — I take great pleasure in notifying you that, in 
response to your circular of last month, our Soeiety to-day forwards 
to the A. H. M. S. sixty-one dollars towards extinguishing the debt. 
Our church is a small one, and this is our first year of self-support, 
having been, heretofore, under the care of the A. H. M. S. Our active 
membership is sixty-seven; our associate membership six. We were 
very glad to respond to such a call as this, and have every confidence 
that the debt will be paid. — Albert L. Cross, Cor. See. Clyde Soc. 

From Minnesota. — I give thanks to God for your wise and most 
helpful efforts to lift the debt from our beloved A. H. M. S. May the 
Lord make his face to shine upon you. — Rev. M. W. Montgomery. 

Frjm Miczigan. — In the noble work you have undertaken our little 
Society of Christian Enieavor hope to do their share. — Maude JSast- 
man, /Sec Benton Harbor. 



4 THE HOME MISSIONARY. May, 

From New Hampshire. — As a Y. P. S. C. E. we are yet, so to speak, 
in embryo. This small offering is the first bit of money collected in 
our Society. May the Lord bless the work ! — Rev. A. H. Burr, 
JPetersborough. 

The Society of the First Church, Northampton, Mass., after forward- 
ing its own generous contribution to the A. H. M. S. for the'debt, sends 
out a word of inspiration to all other societies, closing with these words, 
■which we commend to the notice of all church-members throughout 
the land: "Remember, fellow-member, that your failure to contribute 
makes the burden heavier for the other churches and societies." 

The Home Missionary Crisis. — The home missionary crisis is a 
serious matter for the West. It is like the cry of failing water at sea. 
It is a matter of vital concern ; not that any of our missionaries will 
seriously suffer, for the work in hand will not be cut down materially, 
or, if it be cut down, it will be done gradually, so as not to entail any 
large amount of suffering. But the order, " no more new work,' 1 '' means 
defeat ; and that is a sadder thought to our missionaries than curtail- 
ment or delayed payments. They did not come West for salary ■ they 
expected self-denial, and they are not disposed to count their trials ; 
they came West to do their part to win this growing region for Christ. 
It is this which stirs their enthusiasm and sustains their courage. So 
long as they can see this being done, they welcome the conflicts and the 
trials involved. 

But "no more new work" means that this must be abandoned. The 
frontier must move on and leave our work in the rear. The immense 
immigration filling up our western plains so rapidly must be left 
uncared for. While railroads, commerce and enterprise are straining 
every energy to reach these new centers and new cities, we must fold 
our hands and wait. No matter how urgent the call, " no more new 
work" is the order. While everything is pushing to the front the 
missionary work must lag behind ; the only influence known among us 
which is not on the alert. The missionaries feel as an army would feel, 
when ordered into their intrenchments in the presence of their enemy, 
" because the supplies are short." 

Now is the time to plant the gospel. Communities, like men, ac- 
quire their character in youth. The early influences are the abiding 
influences. We had plans for meeting this emergency in part at least. 
The country had been explored, points of interest had been marked for 
occupancy, and arrangements were being made for the forward move- 
ments. Bat the order is imperative: "no more new work, however 
urgent or promising.' 1 '' So we stop in the midst of our progress and 
wait. How long shall we wait, and for what do we wait ? " The faibu*e 
of legacies has caused the disaster." Must we wait then till the dead 
shall speak? Or shall the living take up the work and provide for a 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 5 

new and speedy advance? — Rev. R. Cordley,D.I>., Lawrence, Kan., in 
"The Church Builder." 

Needed Information. — When a subscriber, who passes the Bible 
House every day, sends his sixty cents to Boston for The Home Mis- 
sionary — when intelligent Christian men and women are in a condition 
of bewildering confusion as to the office and work of the six societies 
of our Congregational churches which are organized for work in our own 
land — we are prepared to give a hearty welcome to the new monthly 
recently started by the New Yoke Woman's Home Missionary Union, and 
appropriately named for that Society. Its first number is filled with 
valuable information, which should be read by every home missionary 
society in the land. Send to Mrs. C. C. Creegan, Syracuse, N. Y., for a 
copy. 

Progress. — The St. Mary's Avenue Congregational Church, Omaha, 
not yet four years old, which was added to our " Roll of Honor" one 
year ago, has recently purchased the finest church location in that 
region. When their pastor, Rev. Willard Scott, asked, one Sunday 
morning, for the necessary $13,000 to pay for the lot, they subscribed 
$14,000 on the spot, and at the same time a generous sum for the 
building, which they propose to put up this season. This valuable 
building lot has a frontage on three streets, and will hold the church, 
chapel, Sunday-school rooms, and manse, with plenty of room and 
frontage for all. This church is also supporting a Bohemian mission 
in the city of Omaha. 

Fellowship Meetings. — From the Nebraska News we learn that the 
series of fellowship and home missionary meetings, which have been 
held at important points through the State, have been "unqualifiedly 
successful." Before this paragraph reaches our readers there will have 
been held, as an outgrowth of these meetings, a strongly ecpiipped 
home missionary convention at some ten different places in the State. 
With a live Board of Directors and a live Superintendent in earnest 
and concerted action, supported by a wide-awake organ like the Nevis, 
Nebraska is well epuipped for work. 

I hope you are hearing of the results of our work in our " Fellow- 
ship Meetings." Mr. Maile and I set forth the cause in the Omaha 
First, last Sunday, while Mr. Sherrill preached for me on the Avenue, 
and we got $516, and more is coming. Fremont, where we were last 
Sunday, has made up $219. Our St. Mary's Avenue collection will 
come on Easter Sunday. We pledge over $200 — the dollar per member. 
Beatrice, Ashland, and the rest fall into the same line, and the campaign 
is still going on. — Rev. W. Scott, Omaha, Neb. 



THE HOME MISSIONABY. May, 



PILGRIM ON HIS OLD TRACK. 

The evangelizing process in Dakota took its rise in Turkey in Asia 
from the banks of the Euphrates. The wife of Rev. C. H Wheeler 
wrote her brother, Judge Brookings, at Yankton, to apply to the Ameri- 
can Heme Missionary Society for its service in that opening Territory. 
In 1868 Rev. Mr. Cook was sent on to start the work at Yankton till 
Joseph Ward could get through at And over to take it up. He soon 
followed. By July, 1870, he had the first Congregational church edifice 
in the Territory ready for dedication. Pilgrim, returning from a tour in 
Colorado, came this way to assist in that service. On his next tour to 
Dakota, in 1871, he rode over from Yankton to Sioux Falls in an open 
mail wagon, haviDg that day a chill and fever sixty miles long. Sioux 
Palls was just coming to be — not as a cataract, but as a settlement. 
The leading proprietor, Dr. Phillips, was living in the officers' part of 
the military barracks, there abandoned. In the soldiers' part, made of 
split puncheons set on end, covered with brush, hay and earth, with the 
ground for a floor, a Sunday-school had been kept up for six months 
under a lady superintendent and occasional preaching by one of the 
missionaries of the Society. In that place of worship on the Lord's day 
we organized the church. The next year the missionary traveler being 
out to attend the new Dakota Association at Canton, came around this 
way to see the growing town. 

His next visit he is now making. Preaching over Sunday for pastor 
Holp, he finds a church of over two hundred members, a Sunday school 
of one hundred and fifty, a large congregation morning an d evenin g, a 
splendid choir, a popular pastor who has a salary of eighteen hundred 
dollars. Though a dozen other churches have come on since that early 
planting, the first one to be organized still keeps the lead. The church 
was counted among the Society's graduates seven or eight years ago. 
A few years since Rev. C. P. Clapp had here one of his revival meetings 
which greatly set foiward the church. It is the old idea — lay down tha 
gospel plant early. 

A tradition lingers here that Pilgrim, climbing over the rocky crag* 
that buttress these stately Falls, wrote them up and named them " The 
Lowell of the West.'' Now he finds upon this rock foundation a seven- 
story stone " Queen Bee Mill," in whose building and running an Eng- 
lish syndicate has used up seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars to 
come to a necessary smash-up financially. The property is falling to 
Geo. I. Seney and his son who lives here, and it is expected that this 
queen bee will soon have the hive a-buzz again with workers. "The 
Cascade Mill," of less pretension, has been always doing a fine business. 
A polishing mill is also driven to polish the "jasper stone," a reddish 



1887. THE HOME M1SSIONABY. T 

quartz, for ornamental purposes, taken from the banks at the Falls. 
Other factories belt themselves on to the trembling waters. Three 
great railway systems, the Northwestern, the Milwaukee and the 
Burlington, have sought out these Falls of the prairies. The State 
Penitentiary and the Deaf Mute Institution are located here in befitting 
establishments. There are here now Baptist and Episcopal colleges, 
with a fine high school crowning the public school series. Four banks 
serve the seven thousand two hundred citizens. Business occupies the 
amphitheatre, and residences creep up over and beyond the river far be- 
yond my expectation. And why shouldn't they be an enterprising peo- 
ple of moral tone when they have been taken off as cream from so many 
of our older western communities, whom I have known there many years 
in their old homes ? 

I told the congregation that on my first visit I came to plant the 
tree, and now I had come to gather some of the fruit. A few basketfuls 
were picked up for the American Missionary Association. And so it is 
that home mission cultivation feeds all the other enterprises of benevo- 
lence. And still there is reciprocity. I found that two of the leading 
ladies in that church had been teachers under the American Missionary 
Association — one of tbem for four years and most of that time during 
the war. — Sioux Falls, D. 1'. 



A WAY-UP PARISH. 

BY REV. C. M. SANDEES, COLORADO, SUPERINTENDENT. 

"I never expected to preach at so high a point on earth as I did 

when standing in the F pulpit one Sabbath," remarked a city parson 

who had exchanged with a country dominie. I shall not soon forget my 
own experience in that lofty box. Those staid old veterans looked and 
the young people smiled as my head came into view. The occupants of 
the front pew were inclined to stretch their necks and lean back a little, 
and even after this effort some of them must have "died without the 
sight.'" That was indeed a lofty watch-tower on a towering hill, but I 
have recently been more highly exalted. 

Imagine yourself seated at the door of a log-cabin. Within you see 
a comfortable, well-arranged and neatly furnished room, with other 
rooms adjacent ; turning to the outward view you find that the cabin is 
located en the very steep side of a very high mountain, among other 
cabins of a like kind. Just below you is a narrow mountain road, upon 
which teams csn pass only at certain points. This road winds around 
the hill. You look down upon a team passing at this moment. Below 



8 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



May, 



the road, the hill is as stesp as above it. A stone the size of your head 
set rolling from the road would most likely not stop until it had reached 
the valley 1,500 feet below. And yet 500 feet from this road are located 




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the steam mill and tramway belonging to the mines. The most valuable 
mine is the " Iron Mask," located a little to our right. Still beyond is 
the "Ben Butler," also a valuable one. In the narrow bottom of this 
valley you see the railroad. The ore is brought out of the hills by rail 
and dumped a thousand feet below into cars placed to receive it. A 
quarter of a mile to the right of where you are seated is a small table- 
land and on this is located a village of a few hundred people. It is a 
new town named for the good man at whose cabin you are stopping. 

Over beyond the deep valley before you is a range of mountains lift- 
ing its lofty peaks, mantled with snow, into the very clouds. Beyond 
and above these is the " Mount of the Holy Cross " towering its ermined 
shoulders to an altitude of 14,176 feet above the sea, and some 3,000 
feet above where you are seated, for you are at an altitude of about 
11,000 feet. It is a " buena vista " — a beautiful view indeed, and one 
calculated to awaken thought and inspire reverence. " No grander view 
can be conceived than that of this wonderful mountain which bears upon' 
..its bosom the sacred symbol of Christianity." I doubt not it was 'mid 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. . 9 

some such scenes that the Psalmist wrote such words as these : "As the 
mountains are round about Jerusalem, so the Lord is round about his 
people from henceforth even forever." Like Peter of old you feel to say 
" It is good to be here," and you would not object to a summer resort 
near this spot ; but you are not called here to see the country simply. 
There is work to be done. 

We go to the village to find the usual complements of a frontier ham- 
let. One of the best buildings is the school-house. The two principal men 
of the town, though not church-menibers, coming from eastern homes 
where the school and the church are important factors, and realizing 
that they were leaders here, purposed to educate the children, and to re- 
spect God's day. To do this properly a building was needed that would 
answer for school-house and church. Contributions were solicited that 
all might share in the enterprise. A substantial frame structure was 
erected and seated to hold 1G0 persons. A cabinet organ was bought and 
one hundred "Gospel Songs" secured. A teacher was hired and a Sunday- 
school was organized. The "Iron Mask" mine which these two men 
control is not worked on the Sabbath. On Sunday evening the school- 
house is opened for Christian worship. At once the house is filled. 
These two men do not feel that they are exempted from the service. 
They act as ushers and helpers, and make themselves a felt force for 
good among those whom they employ. 

Said Mr. Gilman : " The enterprise started at once vigorously. We 
were surprised at the interest manifested, and became somewhat anx- 
ious, wondering what in the world we should do. Who would conduct 
the services? Along came Rev. H. P. Case, your Sunday-school man ; 
he preached and organized a Sunday-school. And now here you are, 
offering to aid us in securing a minister. It is simply wonderful." 

I attended the Sunday-school, at which forty-five were present. By 
request, I taught a Bible class, composed mainly of young men. It was 
an intelligent and interesting class. In the evening it was my privilege 
to conduct the service and preach a sermon. The house was thronged, 
and some were left outside. The audience consisted of young men 
mainly, although there were twenty-five ladies, a few children, and one 
or two men with a sprinkling of gray hairs. Different nationalities were 
represented, but I should judge most of them to be Americans. Quite a 
number of the young men were college graduates.* It was a most re- 
spectful and orderly company, able to appreciate the best one had to 
offer. Standing before them, every eye fixed upon me expectantly, I 
felt the best in me rising for expression. The singing w T as congrega- 
tional, led by a choir. It was ringing and hearty. As I looked upon 
the audience I thought how many mothers and fathers in the East have 
an interest in this service to-night. Taking for my text " What is your 
life?"' I spoke of the value and possibilities of life, asking, what is your 
life to yourself? to your friends? to your position? to the church o 



10 THE HOME MISSIONARY. May, 

Christ? to God? In concluding I sought to emphasize this thought of 
another: "Exalt God in jour thinking and he will exalt you in your 
working." 

I thought, what a held this would be for a young man of ability! 
Where could such a man do more for the church and cause of Christ, and 
indeed, for himself, than in such a parish ? And even were he to return 
to the East afterward, what a grand school this would be for a year or 
two of his earlier manhood ! Then I thought of those who are doing so 
much to sustain our Home Missions, and wished that these who con- 
tribute so liberally to our cause could have been with me. They would 
have received a few of their dividends on the spot. They must have 
been impressed with the value and needs of our work. 

The next day while at the station, waiting for the train, a stranger 
gave me a cordial greeting, and said : " I heard you preach last night ; 
wished my wife had been there. I haven't heard a sermon in three 
years.'' His little boy, standing near, added: "I hain't neither." This 
man lived thirty miles away. A week later as Rev. Wm. L. Gilman, who 
went with me to this field and who now supplies at Gilman, and also at 
Red Cliff, four miles from Gilman, was about to take the train at the 
same place, he became interested in a young man who was also waiting 
for the train. Daring the conversation the young man remarked that 
something in my sermon the week previous awakened his attention. 
Rev. Mr. Gilman's sermon of the night before had deepened the impres- 
sion. He said that his irregular life had caused his parents much trou- 
ble and pain, but now he had come to himself. "I think," said he " that 
the most satisfactory Christmas present I can make to my parents is to 
give them myself, in my right mind, and I am on my way home." That 
night the weather was very cold, and the car was uncomfortable. Mr. 
Gilman settled himself as best he could and finally fell asleep. On 
awaking he found that this young man had taken off his own overcoat 
and placed it over him. These young men have hearts as well as souls. 
How many eastern homes are interested in the home mission work of 
this frontier ? 



FRUIT.— I. 

" Thy. First Love." — My work at an out-station on the eastern side 
of my parish has been attended with unusual difficulties this season. 
The weather has been unprecedentedly stormy so that congregations 
have been thin. Yet the Master has been with us and our hearts are 
refreshed with ten hopeful conversions. I must tell you of one case. 
One evening an old gray-headed man came to service for the first time 
in fifteen years. He went away troubled in his conscience. Within a 
couple of weeks I called the people together for special services, and 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. H 

this old man was the first to ask for prayers. The Lord heard prayer 
and the man went home fdled with the joy of salvation. Living with 
him are his married daughter and daughter-in-law, with their families, 
their husbands being away lumbering. Through the experience of the 
father both daughters have been led to seek and find the Lord, and arc 
very happy in his love. Domestic worship has been instituted and the 
six little children are astonished and delighted. I was in one evening 
after service, and their eyes were dilating in wonder. They had jumped 
out of bed to hear " Grandpa read in that Book and pray I" This family 
are hard pressed just now to find food and fuel, but they are strangely 
happy. With a blizzard every other day, and the thermometer drop- 
ping down into the thirties, the old man said, " I haven't been cold for 
a week I" " Thy first love." What a pity we should ever let the fire 
decline! — Re v. T. /Sims, Valley City, Dak. 

To the utteemost. — An Irishman, a corn doctor by profession, 
who has been roving about the world for years, arose in one of our 
meetings and said : " When I came into this Tabernacle two weeks ago 
I was a tramp, given over to intemperance and vice ; I w r as a broken, 
ragged, and miserable creature. Since I have accepted Christ as my 
personal Savior I have a good business, I am clean, and clothed, and in 
my right reason, sitting at the feet of Jesus. Moreover I have money 
to pay my bills." ... A man who runs a low-down variety 
show brought a lot of girls and women here to play in his place. The 
very day the troupe arrived one of our lady workers found one of these 
girls, who had been induced to run away from home. She brought her 
to church. The girl was converted, and is now working in a religious 
family, and will go back to her mother as soon as she earns money 
enough. Similar incidents are of frequent occurrence in our w r ork here. 
— Rev. T. Uzzell, Denver, Col. 

A Wobd of Cheer. — We are in the midst of most interesting revival 
meetings. I am preaching every evening. God is blessing us. Sev- 
eral have given their hearts to Christ. Remember us in prayer. — Rev. 
G. Marsh, Douglass, Kan. 

Helpful Members. — My church here is a working church. I have 
an experience and prayer service in connection with nearly all my reg- 
ular preaching services, and the result is that the members, even those 
converted only six months ago, are very helpful in revival work. I 
have two who can fill my own outside appointments when I am detained 
by special revival services. Every member of this church (with two excep- 
tions), speaks and prays in public, so I am supported in my missionary 
undertakings by a small, but warm-hearted, active, and working church. 
— Rev. 21 Balch, Hood River, Oregon. 

" That's his Business!" — I began here with seven church-members — 
five women and two men. A few months later we had several young 



12 



THF HOME MISSIONARY. May, 



converts in the church, but there was a stumbling-block in the way, 
which greatly hindered the work. The most wealthy of the original 
seven members of our church was a lady, living one mile from town, 
who never attended our services, but found time to attend places of 
worldly amusement to the injury of the cause of the Master. I wanted 
to sse this lady and talk with her ; but having no horse, and not being 
able at that time to walk that distance, I wrote her a letter. On receiv- 
ing it she walked her room in anger for a while. The next morning she 
read the letter again, and after thinking it all over, she exclaimed, 
" Yes, that's his business ! He ought to look after his church-members. 
I was angry enough last night to have taken a horsewhip to him ! But 
he is right. It's his duty to look after his flock. That's business !" 
Not long after, this lady was actively engaged in the Master's service, 
and progressive euchre and dancing parties had to get along without her. 
The little book, " Our Country," is worth more than gold to me 
here. It reaches people who cannot be touched by books that directly 
attack infidelity. There are not a few who, while they refuse to hear 
the ministers preach, willingly accept and read that book. I have in 
mind at this moment a well-to-do farmer, who has for months been 
persecuting his wife because she gave her heart to Christ and united 
with our church. I believe he will yet be brought in, and that the 
instrumentality used will be that precious book, " Our Country." — A. 
Missionary in Michigan. 



WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT. 



WORDS FROM WOMEN. 

From Missouri. — You will be interested to know that one of our 
church ladies presented each of our twenty-two auxiliaries with a copy 
of " Our Country," with the request that it should be read in their 
respective societies. Our Ladies' Home Missionary Society of Pilgrim 
Church will raise $500 for the "Woman's Fund for work among For- 
eigners" this year. God's kingdom is marching on, and what a glorious 
privilege to have a share in its upbuilding. — Mrs. C. X. G. 

From Nebraska. —Some facetious writer has observed : " The great 
woman question of the day is, What did she have on "?" Popular as this 
theme may be, Nebraska claims a few young women who dare discuss 
the higher problem — "What did she do!" And that our girls are not 
playing at missionary work merely for pastime, but that there is growth 
in knowledge and interest, that there are sacrifices and self-denials, that 
there are added graces of Christian womanhood, such as sympathy 
with Christ and his work alone can give, all become apparent in the 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY 13 

earnest, thoughtful papers they have presented at our associational 
meetings. — Mrs. E. 11. B. 

From Illinois. — I wish you could have been at our Wednesday 
evening prayer-meeting of this week. By invitation of the pastor our 
"Woman's Home Missionary Union" occupied the evening. Four orig- 
inal papers were read by four earnest, intelligent women, and the 
large audience seemed intensely interested. Our local society is 
gradually working its way to the front. The Lord has blessed us in 
our year's labor for him, and our report at the annual church meeting 
showed collections for Home Missions from the Woman's Home Mis- 
sionary Society of sixty members for this, its first year, $376.36. This 
sum was divided between the State Home Missionary Society and four 
of the national Home Missionary Societies. May the Lord continue to 
raise us helpers — men and women, and children too — till this whole 
nation shall be redeemed to him. — Mrs. II. S. II. 

From Minnesota. — Our chief effort ought to be to reach the unin- 
terested ones whose souls are lean with their present schemes of hap- 
piness. Let us who love the work reiterate our fealty to it, persist- 
ently witness to the wealthy poor hearts, unable to find in material 
pleasures a balm for troubled spirits, that our work for the Master 
brings dividends when expositions fail, aud ice palaces melt. As for 
the pennies, and nickels of those who can give but a little, tell them that 
the largest church in Minneapolis — the Swedish Mission Tabernacle — 
which, when finished, will seat more than three thousand people, has 
been chiefly built by the pennies and nickels of our Scandinavian 
friends, mostly poor people. Press for the pennies, not forgetting the 
children. Push for the nickels. Keep the work before all those who 
can give but little, and the enthusiasm will reach those who can give 
largely — Mrs. II. L. C. 

From Michigan. — Our mite-box system is a leaven leavening the 
whole lump, I hope. At least we gain dollars every month from those 
who have never given before, and who probably would never give 
otherwise. Also some are becoming interested in the work, and come 
to the monthly meetings, who have never been before, except when some 
part has been assigned them to read. Throughout our State there 
seems to be a growing interest. We want to get hold of the youth and 
the lit Lie folks. I have great hopes of these if parents will only plant 
the seed of systematic and conscientious giving, making it a part of 
the great principle of daily living. This we should talk of and pray 
for in missionary, church, and temperance work. If we could do this, 
how much less need there would be of burden-bearing. 

Reports of an empty treasury — with the consequent privation and 
suffering of our devoted and faithful horn 3 missionaries — and the need 
for retrenchment that is sounded in the ears of our superintendents, 



14 THE HOME MIS3IONAR7. May, 

and which, if carried out, as it must be without additional means, may 
be the death-knell of many a home missionary church, make more im- 
perative the necessity that our $4,000 be raised, and that it be raised 
at once. We invite you, sisters of Michigan, to aid the Society by com- 
bining the young women, as well as the mothers in our churches, in 
Auxiliaries, and by forming the children into Mission Bands. — Mrs. 
E. F. G. 

From Iowa. — A contribution has just come to our work from a state- 
prison convict; one whose mother always gave a tenth to the Lord, 
and taught her children to do so. He promised his mother that he 
would always observe the practice. Now he is in prison for some 
offense, and earns a very little by making and selling small articles. 
He remembers his mother's early teachings, and his own early pledges 
to her and to the Lord. The. contribution was one dollar and fifty 
cents. Let us all pray that this convict may give his whole heart to 
the Lord, if he has not already done so. 

Inclosed please find $4 for the mite boxes. A young lad who has a 
printing-press is putting on the blank side of each box, "Family Birth- 
day Offerings," and a committee of boys and girls will be sent out to 
distribute them, putting one into each family of our church and con- 
gregation. We hope the returns at the time of ingathering will be 
gratifying. The boxes do not, in any way take the place of the regular 
systematic pledges, but will be used for the special offerings as indi- 
cated, and we hope that each member of the many families will remem- 
ber it. We have introduced "Pledge Cards-' in our society, and quite 
a number of other Societies are doing the same. I sincerely believe 
this to be the best way of giving to the Lord's work. Our plan for 
"Birthday Offerings" was suggested by a little article in the September 
Home Missionary. One of our ladies presented the plan at our 
monthly meeting, with a recommendation to adopt it in our society. 
This same lady reports the work of the American Home Missionary 
Society month by month, and her familiar talks are most interesting. 
The other branches of home missionary work are also reported, so that 
we have variety and much interest in our meetings. — Mrs. T. O. D. 



OUR YOUNG LADIES. 



Allow me to present one thought which I wish might be impressed 
upon the minds -of all, viz.: The imperative need of training our young 
ladies for more efficient missionary work, and by this I mean both the 
work in connection with the management of our societies, and also the 
still more important work at the front, on the mission field. It is very 
evident that we are not utilizing all the forces amoM the ladies of our 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY- 15 

churches when the young ladies are not fully enlisted. Let us make 
special effort to bring out this latent power — this talent folded away in 
a napkin rather than used for the Master. There is more of it than 
most of us are wont to think. 

Many of the older ladies are hindered from active work on account 
of advancing years, or through lack of training in early life, which 
causes them to shrink from taking public part in our societies. Others 
have domestic cares in the superintendence of home and the nurture of 
young children, which absorbs the time and strength of most mother 
to the exclusion of all outside interests, and this is as it should be. 

No sympathy for the Indian in his wigwam, or the Chinese in his 
opium den, or the negro in his hut, singing in his ignorance his weird 
plantation songs, should ever so claim the thought of the mother that 
she shall for a moment neglect the training of the immortal souls in her 
own home. 

Thus it would seem that the burden of the work must, and should, 
fall upon the young ladies, and those who are comparatively free from 
other cares. And why should not young ladies be expected to pre- 
pare themselves to do something in the world, as much as young men? 
It is generally conceded that young men who are worth anything will 
have some useful employment. "Why may we not apply the same rule to 
young ladies, and what grander and more useful work can she engage 
in than that of assisting in the salvation of our country ? 

Many a mother who could not consent to send her daughter abroad 
to carry the gospel to the heathen in other lands, might be willing to 
send her to carry the gospel to the heathen in our own land. Oh, that 
the coming year may not only be rich in contributions of loving sym- 
pathy, prayers and money, but let us hope and pray that we may have 
also the more precious gifts of willing hearts who will say, " Here am Is 
Lord, send me.'' — Mrs. G. C Creegan, Syracuse, JV. Y. 



OUR YOUNG PEOPLE. 



77ie Home Missionary has been plying the young people with 
" questions " for the last six months. Now the young people are re- 
turning the compliment. Here is question number one :' 

" What must we do to become an auxiliary of The American Home 
Missionary Society?' 1 '' 

(10 Let us know that you wish to be auxiliary to this Society. (2.) 
Send us your Constitution. (3.) Do something for the Society in your 
own way. 

" Do we belong to your 4 Home Mission Circle ' if we help the 
A. M. A., and the other Societies tcho work for our country?" 



16 THE HOME MISSIONARY. May, 

Certainly! All young people who are helping to save this land for 
Christ belong to our Home Mission Circle. 



LETTER NO. 8. 

My Dear Young Friends. — If you look at the first page of my cover, 
you will notice that I have had a birthday ! This month ushers in my 
sixtieth year ; but while you continue to love me and care for me as 
you do now, I cannot grow musty or even yellow, with age. On the 
contrary, I think you will find my color somewhat clearer and brigh ter 
as though I had been '' freshened up " a bit. 

I know that in your hearts you wish your old friend a happy new 
year. Shall I tell you what will make it the very happiest of all my 
years ? It is this : To know that every one of my beloved home mis- 
sionary young people, who take so kind an interest in this Society, are 
loving and faithful disciples of our Lord Jesus Christ ; and to know 
also, that each young life is shining so brightly that others must catch 
the light and be won to join the bright army. Such a message from 
one of you would be worth more than anything that this world could 
possibly give me. 

The letter from Kate S ■ this month, in which she speaks of her 

disappointment in not being able to push old Massachusetts in ahead of 
Michigan, reminds me that I ought to tell you something, which will 
comfort our ambitious Kate, and some others of the same State loyalty. 
It is this : Your letters and answers are " counted in " for the Banner 
State, when they reach the Bible House, whether they are printed or 
not. Having only one page, and that only once a month, for letters from 
all the children in this country, or any other, who choose to write, I 
cannot of course print them all ; but the fact that you write, and an- 
swer the questions, brings you and your State into the home missionary 
circle. And now I must close to make room for your " Aunt Nabby " 
who has something for you this month. — Your friend, The Home Mis- 
sionary. 



THAT "MISSIONARY PENNY." 



When Aunt Nabby read in the March Home Missionary, page 423, 
about the little boy who lost his missionary penny, she smiled and said 
to herself : " There's more in that than meets the naked eye !" A great 
many missionary pennies have been lost ; in fact, the old lady has a 
faint suspicion that she's lost more or less herself. In a flash there 
came to her this " Happy Thought." It was a good scheme to make that 
fair divide of the pennies to start with ; and if a few hundred boys and 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 17 

girls should do the same thing, taking care to have a good strong box 
to drop the missionary pennies into, so that they couldn't get lost, be- 
fore it came time to forward them to the American Home Missionary 
Society — conundrum : How many dollars would it amount to in a year ? 
Now, if all the generous-hearted boys and girls who read this, will try 
the plan of dividing, for this purpose, the pennies given them to spend 
for their own gratification they might find it, aside from the pleasure of 
doing good, a nice business arrangement ! For example : Uncle Jack 
who tosses out a penny to buy candy, would very naturally donate a hand- 
ful, if he understood that the missionary cause was to reap the benefit. 

Aunt Nabby is so much pleased with this little plan, that she pro- 
poses to give ten cents to each of the first ten boys and girls who re- 
spond to this appeal, to start their mission boxes. If you think favora- 
bly of the proposal just mention it to your friend The Home 3fission- 
ary, and on its next birthday we will answer the conundrum, by telling 
you the amount of the " Aunt Nabby fund." 



QUESTIONS. 

21. What is the name of that good Christian Bohemian who preached 
the gospel of Jesus Christ to the people in 1403? 

22. Who will tell us something about him? 

23. How long were the followers of this good man persecuted on 
account of their religious belief? 

24. What King released them from this persecution? 

25. What is the crest of the Prince of Wales ? and where did England 
get that crest ? 

26. What connection has Queen Victoria with the Bohemians ? 

[We have received some very interesting bits of history in answer to ques- 
tions 21 and 22. Tue various accounts of John Huss, prepared by our boys and 
girls, will be printed as we have space for them.] 



BANNER STATE THIS MONTH. 

In Contributions — of Home Missionary States, Michigan ; of Aux- 
iliary States, Connecticut. 

In Answers to Questions and Letters — Massachusetts. 
In Home Mission Circles — Ohio. See page 22. 



BY-LAWS OF THE WILLING HELPERS. 

LANSING, MICHIGAN. 

Rale 1. Each member shall pledge himself to contribute willingly 
as his conscience shall dictate. 

Mule 2. Each member shall pledge himself to give hearty support to 
the President in his efforts to make the meetiugs pleasant and profitable. 

Mule 3. All members absent from Roll call, unless detained by sick- 
ness, or absence from the city, shall be fined five cents. This money to 
be kept separately as a contingent fund for the society. 



18 THE HOME MISSIONARY. May, 

Rule 4. Each member shall pledge himself to contribute his share 
towards the profit and entertainment of the society at the regular meet- 
ing, when asked to do so by the presiding officer. 



THE WORK AT HAND —III. 
A Story for Girls. 

BY MRS. LOUISA P. HOPKINS. 
" Do the duty that lies nearest thee; the next will already have become plainer ." 

" Oh, why have I never seen it before, Anna 1 It is the one thing for 
us to do! We — you and I — must bring the gospel of Jesus Christ to 
these people for whom nobody cares !" 

" How can we begin?" said Lucia ; " I do not see any way to reach 
them. How can you introduce yourself ? On what pretext will you 
approach them ? They will hardly recognize your right to teach them. 
They withdraw themselves so, and give everybody a wide berth. You 
very well know that the people up town have learned to let them aelno 
and they simply regard this village as a picturesque part of the drive, 
to the beach. What can you or I do for them ?" 

We shall see a way I am sure," said Anna, hopefully ; "we can begin 
now by speaking to this little brown-eyed girl who peeps at us around 
the gate. 

"Little girl, do you live here?" 

When Lucia's warm hand was placed upon her arm the child at first 
drew back, but soon yielded to its spontaneous touch of love, and 
answered, " Yes, marm," as she kicked the dirt with her bare feet. 

"And do you go to school 1 ?" 

" No, marm ; there ain't no school here." 

"What do you do?" said Anna, while Lucia had by this time taken 
the little brown hand in hers and parted the tangled hair. 

"I don' know; wade, and shell clams, and go out in dad's boat." 

" What is your name ? tell me, dear," said Lucia, " for I'm coming to 
see you to-morrow and I will bring you something." 

The astonished face was raised with a gleam of sweetness, and the 
little fingers twisted Lucia's dress till she presently replied, " My name 
is Liza Jane Thing, and there comes my brothers." At this moment 
two comical looking boys ran to within a short distance and stood with 
their hands in ragged pockets, which were apparently the most care- 
fully conserved part of their vesture, and stared with a curious gaze — 
the bewildering likeness of which in both almost idiotic faces was 
ludicrous in the extreme. It seemed as if one human being had been 
presented in duplicates to make out even a minimum personality. 

"What are your brothers' names, Eliza?" said Lucia. 

With an air of pride the child answered briskly, "George Washing 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 19 

ton and John Quincy Adams Thing." After the announcement of their 
illustrious names the discouraging specimens turned about with a yell 
of excitement, and running to the door- step called out, "Lize Jane, 
marm says you must come in quick." A brief smile of appreciation of 
this scene passed between the maidens before the little girl snatched 
away her hand and ran swiftly toward the house, hardly hearing their 
good-byes as they stood there in the fading light. 

The house was an ancient brown house, smeared with rough yellow, 
and stood out at the end of the street looking toward the sea, from 
whose long white line of breakers it was sometimes dashed with spray. 
It looked like the sentinel of the village, as its tall plumes of prince's 
feather tossed before the small window-panes through which a woman's 
face peered with a forbidding frown. Anna and Lucia turned away, 
after one last look at the foaming bar. Over the submerged flat the 
anchored boats rocked on the swelling tide as their souls upon the 
bosom of God's love, and they each felt that a way was opened for 
their brains, hearts and hands to enter into their Master's work. 



OUR LETTER BOX. 



Dear Home Missionary : Inclosed please find five dollars, which I 
want to give to the Bohemian Fund. I am a little girl twelve years 
old, and this is my apple money. We have four apple-trees in our 
yard, and as there is more fruit on them than we need, mamma and I 
sell some of it, and use the money to do' good with. Mamma says I 
may have five dollars of it to send to you. — Yours truly, Carrie E. C. 
— Massachusetts. 

[I hope other little girls who read your letter will find something in the yard 
or house which can be turned into money to do good with.] 

Dear Home Missionary : We have formed a circle to be called the 
" Mt. Hermon Band of Boys," and have chosen for our first work the 
Bohemian boys, their customs and life, and the work being done among 
them by the home missionaries. — 3fassachttsetts. 

[An excellent plan I Will your secretary write us a letter now and then, tell- 
ing us what you find out about the Bohemian boys?] 

Dear Home Missionary: I do enjoy your children's corner very 
much, especially your letters to us. They are very nice. My dear little 
brother John sings Sunday-school hymns very sweetly. He is a great 
pet. One night he saw a picture of a large lion, and he exclaimed, 
" What a commence lion ! — Missouri. 

[I don't wonder you love that sweet little brother. Our little " Jcjo," about 
his age, says, whenever he passes the Episcopal church, " That's the pickle 
church !"] 



20 THE HOME MISSIONARY. May, 

Jessie L , Michigan, says, " My mother is a home missionary 

woman, and I am a home missionary girl." 

[Good ! What can you find to do for H mie Missions in Michigan, Jessie?] 

Dear Home Missionary : When I came home from school yesterday 
noon I found you had arrived. I confess I felt a good deal disap- 
pointed to find that my answers did not reach you in season for this 
month. I did want to see that Massachusetts had outstripped Mis- 
souri in the number of questions answered ! I have resolved to answer 
those of !;his month immediately, so that mine may reach you as early 
as any. Please give us more than two to answer next month, for I 
like to find them out, and I mean to interest some other children here 
to write to you. — ITate C. 8. — Massachusetts. 

[I am read/, dear Kite, to shake hands with all the children whom you 
introduce into our home missionary circle. Our family is increasing very rapidly, 
but I notice that with every addition my old heart gets bigger and younger. I'm 
only too thankful that through you young; people it isn't in any present danger of 
Shriveling for lack of love. — The Home 3Iimonary.~\ 



AMERICAN COLLEGE AND EDUCATION SOCIETY. 

Rev. John A. Hamilton, D.D., Secretary. 

10 Congregational House, Boston. James M. Gordon, Esq., Treasurer. 

[Money may be sent to James M. Gordon, Esq., Treasurer, No. 10 Congregational 

House, Boston; or to Rev. Alexander H. Clapp, D.D., 34 Bible House, New York.] 



The need of more Ministers. — An earnest and influential Christian 
laborer in Nebraska writes as follows : 

For two reasons, chiefly, the need of ministers and missionaries on 
the western frontiers is imperative. First, the immense immigration, 
and second, the prevailing danger of Christians relapsing into worldli- 
ness and neglecting duty when beyond the influences of the church and 
the Sabbath. The missionary rmist go with the people. 

A town site was surveyed July 31st, 1885 : lots sold August 1st. 
Sept. 13th, a church organized in a gospel tent ; less than three months 
after the church was formed, a neat church building was ready for dedi- 
cation, the town then having more than 1,000 people. 

This work was done by a missionary Superintendent, whose services 
were needed in several places at the same time. A man was immediate- 
ly sought to relieve him here ; but months passed before one could be 
found. To be the father of church work in a town of such promise 
should awaken the ambition of any lover of the Master's cause. 

A county containing 5,000 people in one of our frontier States had 
five Congregational church organizations in 1882 and not a pastor for 
any one of them. No church building existed in the county, neither a 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 21 

church prayer-meeting. About seventy members were enrolled hi the 
five churches. In less than five years the population has more than 
doubled. Eight Congregational churches are in existence; four of these 
have good church buildings paid for ; the membership in the county 
has reached nearly 100 ; three of the churches having received into 
membership in the first three months of 1887 as many members as the 
five churches contained in 1882. Prayer-meetings are well sustained. 

The frontier missionary superintendents are praying and searching 
for men for these vacant churches. Were this all, the problem would 
be greatly simplified. But what shall be done for the new communi- 
ties ? Counties in Nebraska which three years ago knew only the cow- 
boys, have to-day nearly 10,000 people each. Is there a proportionate 
increase of self-sacrificing Christian workers for these rapidly openiug 
fields ? The statistics from our Theological Seminaries answer with an 
emphatic no. Let the churches consider this. Let the American Edu- 
cation Society consider it and do with its might in the way of giving aid 
and encouragement to young men of the true spirit to prepare them- 
selves for entering the doors of these great opportunities. 

Much of the best material for ministers and missionaries is with that 
class of young men who are destitute of pecuniary means and therefore 
unable to meet without assistance the great expenses of a college and 
seminary course. Shall they be turned to other pursuits than those of the 
Christian preacher and missionary laborer because the prayers and 
helping hands of the Lord's people are withheld ? 

Surely this inquiry is one which the churches are solemnly called to 
answer. They cannot be indifferent to the work of raising up ministers 
if they truly love Christ's gospel and desire its faithful proclamation 
among men. For " how shall they hear without a preacher? And how 
shall they preach except they be sent?" 



MISSIONARY BOXES. 

For many years the ladies of our churches have helped this Society andTcheered the 
homes of its missionaries with boxes of clothing and other useful articles. The continuance 
of these favors is earnestly solicited. To secure satisfactory preparation and just distribu- 
tion, attention is invited to the following suggestions. 

1. Apply to the Secretaries to designate a family needing such assistance, and state, 
if practicable, how soon a box will probaoly be sent. 

2. If a family is selected without applving to the Secretaries, notify them without delay 
so as to guard against a duplication of gifts. 

3. If several months should elapse before the box is ready to be sent, ascertain from the 
Secretaries whether the missionary's address remains as previously giver.. 

4. Mark the box plainly and indelibly, fasten it securely, and forward it to the missionary, 
not by express, but by a Forwarding Company, if practicable ; otherwise, as "fast freight," 
by railroad, taking two receipts from the Company. 

5. Write to the missionary, inclosing one of these receipts, a list of the articles sent in 
the box, and the money, $2, $3, or $4, according to weight and distance, for the payment of 
freight (if it cannot be prepaid). Mention, also, the name of the person to whom a letter 
of acknowledgment should be addressed. 

6. Report to the Secretaries the forwarding of the box, its estimated value, and the 
amount sent for freight, in order that the donation may be acknowledged in The Home 
Missionary. 

7. If a box has been prepared, not for a specified family, but to be assigned by the 
Secretaries, put into it a list of its contents, the name of the association or individual from 
whom it comes, and the address of the person to whom the missionary may send his letter of 
acknowledgment. 



22 THE HOME MISSIONARY. May, 

8. Mark the box, "American Home Missionary Society, Bible House, Astor Place, New 
York," adding the name of the place from which it comes. 

9. Write to the Secretaries, inclosing money for freight, and stating the time when and 
the line by which the box was sent, its estimated value, and giving a list of contents to guide 
in the assignment of the box. Be careful to state the size of each adult, and the age and 
sex of each child for whom the clothing is intended, as boxes are not opened at the office. 

10. These donations are not deducted from the grants of the Society. It needs the same 
amount of money, therefore, in order to fulfill its stipulations with its missionaries, as if no 
such gifts were provided ; and we trust the friends of Home Missions will not withhold or 
diminish their contributions of money in consequence of their giving other things tliat are 
needful. 

WOMAN'S FUND FOR FOREIGN WORK. 

Previously acknowledged 91,925 4S 

Connecticut, Litchfield 5 00 

New London 75 oo 

Massachusetts, Amherst 1 19 00 

Ashburnham 11 00 

Boston 183 33 

Bridge,vater, Easi 13 75 

Brockton 5 00 

Brookfield, North SO 00 

Chicopee Falls 30 Oi) 

Dorchester 160 25 

Fairhaven 4 00 

Globe Village is 00 

Hadley 5 00 

Huntington 5 00 

Lawrence S7 71 

Leeds 25 oO 

Longmeadow 1"2 26 

Monson 25 oo 

Newburv, West 4 oo 

Newtonviile 5 00 

Northampton 135 oo 

Orange 35 00 

PittsSeld 200 00 

Randolph 12 oo 

South Hadley 127 oo 

Somerville 10 00 

Springfield 230 00 

Stockbridge 5 00 

Walpole 64 00 

Ware 7 50 

Westfleld 40 00 

Westminster 26 00 

Maine, Gardiner 1 00 

Missouri, St. Luiiis 213 00 

New York, Binghamton 25 00 

Brooklvn 11 25 

New York 10 00 

Riverhead 25 CO 

Vermont, St. Johnsbury 100 00 

Wallingf ord .' 1 00 

$4,150 51 



CHILDREN'S BOHEMIAN FUND. 

Previously acknowledged $1,258 64 

Connecticut, Daubury 65 00 

Darien 40 

Westminster 2 00 

Iowa, Mount Pleasant 6 60 

Massachusetts, Chicopee 10 00 

Falmouth 34 00 

Neponset 6 52 

Westfleld 9 oo 

Michigan, Olivet 7 60 

New York, Saratoga Springs 15 00 

Ohio, Harmar 20 00 

Mansfield 10 00 

Springfield l 60 

Rhode Island, Kingston 10 00 

$1,456 36 



HOME MISSION CIRCLES. 



Forty-nine Home Mission Circles have thus far come to our knowledge. We shall be glad to 
fcearjfrom others. Of these forty-nine, Ohio has 12 ; Nebraska, 10 ; Massachusetts, 8; New York, 
0; Dakota, 4; Michigan, 3; Connecticut, 2; Minnesota, Missouri, District of Columbia, and New 
Eampshir e, each 1 . 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



23 



APPOINTMENTS IN MARCH, 1887. 



Not in commission last y tar. 

Battey, George J., Kee Heights, Greenleaf auil 

Baker 80iiool-Uou.se, So. Dak. 
Cooper, Samuel B., Pittston and Bxater, Penn. 
De Geer, W. W., Ada and Baldwin, Mich. 
Denham, Or. A. C, Teacher, Atlanta, Ga. 
Karl, .lames, Minneapolis, Miuti. 
F ister, Henry K., Walla Walla, Wash. Ter. 
Frary, Lueieu II., Sierra Madre, Oal. 
Seer, Eeman, Bradshaw and llandolph, Neb. 
ilavnson, James, North Bend, Neb. 
Hewitt, John B, H., Breckinridge, Colo. 
Howell, Edward B., Mojave, Oal. 
Hughes, Benjamin M., Shamokin, Penn. 
KaniL'V, Josiah J., Valid rbilt and Berrvville, 

Mich. 
Martin, Evan II., Corry, Penn. 
Millar, vVitliam II., Gaylord, Mich. 
Richardson, William T., Apopka and Merrimack, 

Fia. 
stone, Sidney, Ada, Miun. 

Re-commissioned. 

Albert, John H., Stillwater, Minn. 
Bonnell, William H., Julesburg, Colo. 
Bowers. John M., Kidder. Mo. 
Breckenridge, Daniel M.,Port Orange and Holly 

Hill, Fia. 
Bronson, Samuel M., Dassel, Cokato and Colling- 

wood, Minn. 
Bunnell, John J., Bridgman and Sawyer's, Mich. 
Chandler, Joseph, Lakeland and Afton, Minn. 
Cole, H. Hammond, Tucson, Ariz. 
Cooper, James, Severy, Kan. 
Crane, Henrv C. Omaha and Omaha View, Neb. 
Craae, JohnF., Horton's Bay and Hayes, Mich. 
Dalgliesch, George C, Roscommon, Mich. 
Dexter, Granville YL, Soquel, Cal. 
Diggs, Marshall W., Ft. Recovery, Ohio. 
Dixon, Ellis W., Wenas and Natchez, Wash. Ter. 
Edwards, William, Ft. Abererombie and McCau- 

leyville,No. Dak. 
Gilchrist, Howard H., Longton and Elk Fills, 

Kan. 
Gray, Mathew S., East Paris, Mich. 
Hamilton, Henry P., Eldred, N. Y. 
Harrison, Charles S., Franklin, Neb. 
Harrison, Marvin B., SoribuT, Neb. 
Herrick, Robert P., Montevideo and vicinity, 
Minn. 



Hodges, JohnG., Irotiton and out-stations, Mich. 

Houston, Warren H., Alpine, Macon and nar- 
niiiiv, Neb. 

Howell, James, Bala and out-stations, Kan. 

Ilulett, James A., Bartletl and (near Creek, Neb. 

Jenkins, E. 11., Stockholm, N. V. 

Jewell, J. Spencer, Albuquerque. New Mex. 

Johnson, Alfred P., Springfield, Mo. 

Kelsey, Lysander, Portland Heights and Beaver- 
ton, Or. 

Leavitt, William, Muscotah and New Maiden, 
Kan. 

Lewis, William, Etnaville, Ohio. 

Le vis, William H., Cherokee City, Ark. 

Lucas, Oramel W., Pendleton, Or. 

Lyman, Albert T., Alexandria and Emery, So 
Dak. 

McConaughy, Frank, sprague, Hoek Lake and 
crab Creek, Wash. Ter. 

Mather, Wallace E., Paris, N. Y. 

Montgomery, William C, San Mateo and Riuco- 
nada, New Mex. 

Morns, George, Port Costa and Crockett, Cal. 

Nicol, John, Chase and out-stations, Mich. 

Page, William D., Cowles and Guide Rock, Neb. 

Parker, Thomas, Shelby, Mich. 

Peebles, Arthur B., Hooper and Lynne, Utah. 

Phillips, John, Stony Point, Cal. 

Read, Robert H., D.D., Eureka, Ark. 

Richards, Howard A. N., Hampden, Ohio. 

Riedinger, Jacob P., Findlay, Ohio. 

Rood, John, Lake City, ziimbrota and Forest 
Mills. Minn. 

Smith, Silas L., St. Louis, Mo. 

Southworth, Edward, Clay Center, Neb. 

Sparrow, Josiah P., Lakeside and Bitney's school- 
house, Neb. 

Spelman, Levi P., Coral and Howard City, Mich. 

Stevenson, William D. J., Glencoe, Fairview and 
Dodge, Neb. 

Stewart, William C. Etna, Ft. Jones, Oro Fino 
and Callahans, Cal. 

Scorer, F. A. S., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Thalberg, H. L., Huron, So. Dik. 

Thirloway, Timothy. Green River City, Wyo. 

Thome, James A.. Ogalalla, Neb. 

Travers, Robert M., Ravenna, Neb. 

Trimble, George W., Tipton and out-stations, Cal. 

Tulhill, Edward B., San Miguel, Cal. 

Van Camp, Albert J.. Bridgeport, Mich. 

Williams, John, Bangor, Penn. 



RECEIPTS IN MARCH, 1887. 

The following statement includes the amounts paid directly into the Treasury, together with 
those reported by Auxiliaries, as expended in their fields during the last Missionary year. 
The sums expended by Auxiliaries within their biunds are marked ("). 



T 24 
5 00 



10 CO 



15 2T 

40 

100 00 



MAINE— $834,22. 

Maine Missionary Society *$16,709 91 

Acton, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, by 

W. A. Merrill 

Bingor, A Friend, for the Debt 

Bethel, Second Ch., for the Debt, by 

Rev. D. Garland 

Castiue, Ch., $6.84; Sunday-school, $5; 

Y. P S. C. E., $3.43, for the Debt, by 

A.F.Adams 

Mrs. Cate, by Rev. J. P. Cushmau. . . 
Center Lebanon, A Friend, for the Debt 
Falmouth, First, Extra Coll. for Debt, 

oy Rev. H. C. M. Knight 10 00 

Farmington, A Friend, for Debt, by 

Rev. C. H. Pope 10 00 

Fort Fairfield, Dea. S. Seabury, by Rev. 

R. D. Osgood 5 00 

Gardiner, A Lady friend, for Woman's 

Dept 100; 

Kennebunk, by Jos. Titcomb 36 74 

Machias, Ladies of Cong. Ch., for Debt, 

by G. Longfellow 15 00 

North Bridgeton, by N. Lincoln 6 65 

North Brighton, Ladies, for the Debt, I 



by Mrs. C. C. Farns worth 

Norridgewock, A Friend 

Portland, Bethel Ch., by Maj. J. M. 

Gould 

Second Parish Ch., $87.35; Y. P. S. 
C. E., for the Debt, $32.65, by C. A. 

Dunlap 

West Ch., Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, 

by A. L. Fuller 

State Street Ch., $:)18.55 ; Sunday- 
school, $55 ; J. R. Prince's class, 

$10, for Debt, by W. S. Corey 

Williston, Y. P. S. C. E., fortheDebt, 

by W. H. Pennell 

Sunday-school, for the Debt, by E. 

F. Garland. 

Readfield, A Friend, for the Debt 

Scarboro, by Arthur Smith 

Searsport, First Ch., for tne Debt, by 

Rev. R. G. Harbutt 

South Freeport, Y. P. S. C. E., for the 

Debt, by Rev. C. L. Nichols 

West Auburn, for the Debt, by S. N. 

Grose 

Yarmouth, B. Freeman, for Debt 



$5 00 
4 00 



120 00 

8 00 

383 55 

25 00 

25 00 
5 00 
5 40 

12 45 

5 00 

3 27 
20 00 



u 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



May, 



NEW HAMPSHIRE— $3,780.66; of which 
Legacies, $2,000.00. 

New Hampsnire Missionary Society. *$li,946 72 
Received by L. D. Stevens, Treas. N. 
H. M. Soc: 
Atkinson, $10 ; A Friend, $5. . . .$15 00 

Brookline 5 00 

Concord, First Co., to cjnst. 
Mrs. F. H. George, Mrs. C. 
R. Scoolcratt, Dea., A. S. 
Smith and John C. Thorn L. 

Ms 400 00 

A Friend 2 oo 

Exeter, Coll. at Union Miss. 

meenns in Second Ch 53 02 

Epping, John M. Fitz 5 00 

Hampstead, Miss Anna M. 

Howard 10 oo 

Keene, First 94 00 

Meredith Village, $65 ; Lake- 
side Workers, $5 70 00 

Peterborough, Union Evan. 

Ch 38 25 • 

Winchester, Mrs. J. C. Stnith"s 
Piimary class in Sunday- 
school 10 00 702 27 

Alstead Center, Mabel Gibs-m, for Debt, 

by Rev. G. A. Beckwith 10 

Amherst, Rev. A. J. McGoun, for Debt 10 00 

Bath, by Carrie E. Patterson 6 10 

Brentwood, by H. C. Mank 9 00 

Cheerful Givers, for Children's Bo- 
hemian fund, by Chas. Flanders 5 00 

Claremont, Five members of Ch., by 

Ellen R. Putnam 11 00 

Concord , On account of Legacy of James 
McQuesten, by Hon. L. 1). Stevens, 

Ex 1,400 Of 

Y. P. S. C. E. of North Ch., for the 

Debt, by M. H. Ballard 16 63 

Deerfiebi, Legacy of Stephen Brown, 

by J. T. Brown, Ex 100 00 

Derrv, First, for the Debt, by G. W. 

Barker loo oo 

Y. P. s. C. E., for Debt, by Miss C. M. 

Underhill 

East Alstead, A Friend, for Debt, by 

Rev. G . A . Beckwith 

East Derry, First Ch., "In memory of 
one who died embracing the prom- 
ises," for Debt, by F. W. Parker 100 00 

Epping, Family of Rev. J. H. Siearns, 

bv Mrs. F. W. Spaulding 10 00 

Exeter, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt.... 67 05 

A Friend, for Debt 2 00 

A Friend, for the Debt 10 00 

Francestown, Ch. and Sunday-school, 

for the Debt, bv A. Downes 21 00 

For Debt, "B." 5 00 

Franklin, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, 

by L. S. Davenport 4 50 

Gilmanton, Center Ch., for Debt, by J. 

H.Drew 5 00 

Hampton, A Friend 6 00 

Hanover, Miss B. L. Moody, for the 

Debt ; 5 00 

AFnend 50 00 

Haverhill, Sunday-school, $7.64 ; Two 
Friends, $1.25, for the Debt, bf W. O. 

Burbeck 8 S9 

Hinsdale, by N. E. Pratt 9 66 

Cong. Sunday-school, for the Debt, 

by C. W. Clark 19 75 

Hollis, Legacy of John C. Jewett, by E. 

J. Colburn, Ex 500 00 

Littleton, First Ch., by A. J. Church. .. 17 33 
Manchester, Hanover Street Ch.,$114.- 
08: Y r . P. S. C. E., for the Debt, $35, 

by J. A. Goodrich 149 08 

Mason, Cong. Sunday-school, for the 

Debt, by Rev. D.Goodwin 5 00 

C. B. Goodwin 7 00 

MUford, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, by 

C. S. Emerson 37 60 

M ilton M ills, by M rs. G. S. Butler 5 50 

Mt. VernoD, for the Debt, by Rev. R. H. 
McGown 17 CO 



14 00 
90 



Nashua, First $100 00 

New Hampshire, " Little Robbie's 

money.'' 5 00 

Newport, A Lady 5 00 

North Hamp on, Y. P. S. C. E., for the 

Debt, by H. C. Yates 15 05 

Nonhwood Center, Mrs. E. E. Wiggin, 

fur the Debt 20 00 

Ossipee, A. J. Sceggel, $2 ; E. J. Smith, 

$2, by E. J. Smita 4 00 

Pelham, Mrs. G. W. Tyler 10 00 

Penacook, by Rev. C. E. Millikin 10 00 

Peterborough, Y. P. S. C. E., for the 

Debt, by Miss M. M. Knight 2 00 

Portsmouth, A Friend of Home Mis- 
sions for the Debt, $500 00. 
[Erroneously acknowledged in April.] 

Rochester, First, by H. M. Plumer 60 00 

Stratham, Cong. Ch., A Friend, for the 

Debt 4 00 

Warner, Ladies' Miss. Soc, for the 

Debt, by Miss R. B.Thompson 4 00 

Mrs. A. G. H. Eaton, for the Debt 10 00 

West Lebanon, Y. P. S. C. E., $11.25; 
Suuday-scnool,$15 ; Charles H. Dana, 

$25 for the Debt, t.y W. F. Hale 51 25 

Mrs. Latham, by W. F. Hale 5 00 

Winctiester, for the Debt, by Rev. M.S. 

Hartvveh 43 oo- 

Ladies' H. M. Soc, special, by Mrs". 

A. G. Atherton \\ 00 

VERMONT— $2,529,17 ; of which Legacy 
1,000.00. 
VeimontDom. Missionary Society.. *$10, 718 48 

Benson, E. S. A. and J. A. S 1 00 

" From Lend a Hand," for Debt. ..." 1 00 
Bennington, Miss A. C. Park, for Debt 50 00 

Biaudon, bj d. H. Vail 18 00 

Brattleboro, Dea. J. S. Wilder, %>15 ; C. 

F. Thompson, $5 30 00 

Brownington, Mrs. Fanny Smith ! 2 00 

Burlington, First, Y. P. S. C. E., for 

the Debt, by W. L. B. Collins 2S 30 

Castleton, by G. P. Byington of which 

lor Debt $12.68 ig 36 

Charlotte, Y r . P. S. C. E., for the Debt, 

by Rev. A. W. Wild 10 00 

Chelsea, First, by Mrs. W. P. Town- 
send 30 00 

A Friend, for Debt "" 4 00 

Corinth, for the Debt, by Rev. H. P. 

James ' " 16 50 

Cornwall, by Rev. M. C. Stebbins....'!! 75 no 

E. R. Robbins g a 

A Friend for Debt W.W. 1 00 

Dorset. A. M. Holley, in full for L. M*. 

and for the Debt 25 00 

Ferrisburgh, S. A. Carpenter ..." ' 5 00 

Hartford, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, 

by Rev. S. I. Briant 14 00 

Manchester, Rev. A. Hemenway, for 

tneDebt. 5 00 

AFnend -^ 00 . 

Milton, by C. H. Jackson WWW 6 4S 

Cong. Sunday-school for Debt.'by 

F. C. Ladd ;.. 15 00 

Middletmry, Mission Circle of the 
Cong. Ch., for Debt, by Miss Mary L. 
Spea r | 5 00 

Li. K. S 2 00 

North Bennington, Y. P. S. C. E., for 

Debt, by Rev. G. R.Hewitt 2 50 

North Crafisbury, Rev. J. Eraser, for 

the Debt 10 00 

Northfield, E. H. Catlin '.'.'.'" 5 00 

North Pownal, M. Whipple 50 00 

Norwich, N. R. Nichols, for the Debt.. 1 00 

Peru, Rev. A. B. Peffers, for the Debt 5 00 
Quechee, Mrs. H. Thomas, Jr., for 

Uebt 3 00 

Randolph, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, 

by Miss A. S. Murphy s 00 

St. Albans, by C. Wyman 208 OO 

St. Johnsbury. Legacy of Miss E. L. 

Taylor, by J. C. Tavlor, Ex 1,000 00 

North Ch., $17.60; Y. P. S. C. E., for 

the Debt, $5.29, by W. C. Tyler 22 89 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



25 



North Oh., W. H. M. S.,"M."$20; 
Ten cent contributions, $42.33, for 

the Debt, by Mrs. W. P. Smith $62 33 

Somh Ch., A Friend, for the Debt.... 100 00 
I. allies' II. M. 8oc. ot South Oil., $75; 

Mrs. \V. P. Fairbanks, $'25 100 00 

Girls' Mission Band, for the Debt, by 

Mrs. (J. II. Cross 10 CO 

"S. M. B.," for Debt 3 00 

St. Johnsburv, East, 'Band of Prom- 
ise," for the Debt, by I. M. Locke 1 00 

Saxton's Kiver, by John Ramsay, for 

the Debt 25 64 

South Kovalton, Mrs. J. K. Morris, for 

Debt, by E. Foster 100 oo 

Springfield, Y. P. S. C. E.,lor the Debt, 

by Rev. <'. 8. Mills 26 08 

"A Contribution for the work" 300 00 

Stowe, " Vermont," for the Debt 12 03 

Thetford, Mrs. A. H. Farr, for Debt 5 Ou 

Vergennes, by Andrew Ross, for the 

Debt 25 00 

Walliugford, Woman's Aux., for the 

Debt, by Miss C. A. Marsh 15 00 

Miss C. M. Townsend, Woman's Den't 1 00 

Waterbury, by Rev. U. M. Sheldon 8 36 

West Brattleboro, in full, to const. M. 
J. Mather a L. M., by H. H. Thomp- 
son 13 52 

West Randolph, A Friend 3 00 

Westminster, West, Y. P. S. C. E., for 

the Debt, by D. R. Ranney 8 11 

Y. P. S. c. E., for the Debt, by Rev. 

A. Stevens, D.D , 15 00 

Williamstown, A Friend 80 

Windham, for the Debt, by A. J. 
Stearns 10 00 

MASSACHUSETTS— $27,453.27 ; of which 
Legacies, $8,350.00. 

Mass. Home Missionary Society * $43,070 71 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. B. 

Palmer, Treas 2,000 00 

For Western work among Foreigners 4, 5f0 00 

Special f cr the Debt 5,656 57 

By B. T. Gale, of Lee 75 00 

Received by C. Marsh, Treas. Hamp- 
den Benev. Assoc: 
Longmeadow.Rev. C. Peabody.. .?5 00 

South Hadley Falls 21 25 

Thorndike, A Friend 5 00 

Westfleld, First, Y. P. S. C. E. 135 00 
First, for Bohemian work. ... 9 00 
Wiloraham, in full to const. 

MissA.L. Corblna L.M 32 75 

208 00 



Amherst, First, bv "W. Hamlin, of 
which for Debt, $125 175 00 

Amesbury, Union Evan. Ch., by E. A. 
Goodwin 15,00 

Andover, South Ch.,$25 ; Edward Tay- 
lor, $50; Y. P. S. C. E.,$50, for the 

Debt, by Geo. Gould 125 00 

Seminary Ch.. a few friends, for the 

Debt, by Mrs. H. N. Fay 50 00 

From friends in Seminary Ch., spe- 
cial coll. for Debt, by Mrs. Fay, by 

Rev. C. C. Carpenter 50 00 

"Mrs. S. A. G.," for the Debt 5 00 

Ashburnham, Y\ P. S. C. E., for the 

Debt, by C. G. Tobev 

Rev. J. D. Crosby 

Ashtield, Ch., in full to const. C. A. 
Richmond a L. M., by Mrs. D. Wil- 
liams 

Y. P. S. C. E.. $7.50; Cong. Sunday- 
school, $7. 50, for Debt, by Rev. J. 
Wadhams . 

Attleboro, Second, for the Debt, by A. 
B. Carpenter 32 00 

Attleboro Falls, Central Ch., for the 
Debt, by Rev. G. O. Jenness 11 00 

Barre, Ladies' Soc, for the Debt, by 
Mrs. A. G. Williams 6 00 

Belchenown, for the Debt, by Rev. P. 

W. Lyman 6 00 

A. C. Blodgett, for the Debt 2 00 



7 00 
5 00 



45 75 



15 00 



Berkley, for Debt, by Rev. J. E. M. 
Wright $10 25 

Berlin, s. W. Lincoln 5 00 

Beverly, San Greal Assoc, for the 
Debt, by W. F. Crafts 76 0O 

Blandford, L. D. Tiffany 40 

Boston, on account of Legacy of John 
Gilbert, by Elizabeth G. Frost, Ex.. 1,090 00 
Legacy of a Lady ninety-six years 

Ol age 100 00 

Shaumut < li., A. S. Lovett, for Debt. . 15 OO 
W. H. M. A., by Mrs. H. H. Proctor, 

Treas 183 33 

Rev. A. E. Dunning, for the Debt 20 00 

Rev. L. Farnham, for Debr, 10 00 

Rev. I. P. Langworthy,D.D io 00 

A Friend of the cause, for Debt. .. . 500 00 
From a Friend, througn Rev. E. B. 
Palmer, special 5 00 

Boxford, A Friend 5 00 

Braintree, Infant Sunday-school, First 

Ch.. for Debt 10 00 

E.F. E.T 10 00 

Brighton, LaoMe«,$9-05 ; Children's Mis- 
sion Band, $13 ; Young Chr. Assoc, 
$5 ; for the Debt, by Mrs. B. Wor- 
melle 27 C5 

Brockton, Ladies' Praying Circle, for 
Woman's Dept., by Mrs. E. F. Gard- 
ner 5 00 

Y". P. S. C. E., for the Debt, by M. S. 
Gurney 2 5 00 

Brookfleld, Mrs. J. P. Montague, for 
the Debt 5 no 

Cambridge, Prof. J. H. Thayer, for Debt 10 00 

Cambndgeport, Prospect Street, Y. P. 
S. C. E., for the Debt, by A. L. Merrill 8 29 
A Friend 5 no 

Charlestown, Mrs. C. A. Goodwin 5 00 

Charlton, Special coll. for Debt, by Rev. 
W. Sewall 700 

Chelsea, E. B. Evans, for the Debt 5 00 

Chicopee, Busy Bee Mission Circle, ' 
Third Ch., by A. F. Gaylord, for Cail- 

dren's Bohemian fund jo CO 

Y r . P. S. C. E., for Debt, by Emma B*. 

Hosley 3000 

Y. P. S. C. K, for the Debt, by W. E. 
Dickinson 25 OO 

Chicopee Falls, Y. P. S. C. E. of Second 
Ch., for the Debt,, by Isabel Stevens.. 33 00 
Miss M. M. Hoisicgton, for the Debt. 5 00 

Concord, Y. P. S. C. E. of Trin. Cong. 
Ch., for Debt, by G. H. Hopkins 17 5S 

Conway, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, by 
Mrs. W. E. Hanks s 00 

Deerfleld, Y. P. S. C. E., for Debt, by 
Rev. A. Hazen 28 00 

East Granville, Y. P. 3. C. E , for the 
Debt, by W. Griswold 10 72 

Easthamoton, Y. P. S. C. E., for the 

Debt, by Miss B. H. Dewar 20 00 

Ladies' Benev. Soc. of Payson Ch., 
for Debt, by Miss Lydia A. Ferry. . . 50 00 

East Milton, A Friend, for Debt 5 00 

A Friend, for Debt 100 

Essex, Y r . P. S. C. E., for the Debt, by 
I. P. Howes 15 50 

Falmouth, Ladies' Sew. Circle, by Miss 

S. E. Herendeen 5 to 

Susie Herendeen, for Debt 2 00 

Fall River, A Friend, a Thank offt ring, 
for Debt 5 00 

Fitchburg, C. C. Ch., Y. P. S. C. E., for 

the Debt, by W. K. Bailey 54 75 

Mrs. A. C. Hill, for Debt 10 00 

Florence. Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, 

by W. R. Wood 30 00 

A Friend, for Debt 1 00 

Foxboro, for the Debt, by Rev. A. E. 
Tracy 50 00 

Framingham, Legacy of George A. 
Trowbridge, by W. H. and *i. A. 
Trowbridge 500 00 

Gilbertviile, by Rev. A. H. Richardson. 5 55 

Globe Village, Young Helpers of Free 
Ch., by Rev. S. Hay ward 30 00 



26 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



May, 



Evan. Ch., Young Helpers, by Rev. S. 

Hay ward $6 00 

Gloucester, Y. P. S. C. E. of the Evan. 
Cong. Ch., for the Debt, bHy C. . 

Fisher 103 00 

Granby, A Friend 8 00 

Great Harrington, Sunday-school, for 

the Debt, by L. A. Rogers 7 00 

Groton, Mrs. Mary M. S. Spaulding, for 

Debt, to const her a L. M 50 00 

Hadley, First, for the Debt, by Rodney 

Smith 15 05 

Russell Ch., M. C 3 00 

Hamilton, Mrs. Mary P. Allen, for Debt 5 00 

Haverhill, A Friend for the Debt 3 00 

Hinsdale, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, 

byMissG. M. Brague 25 00 

Holden, Miss Nancy Perry, for Debt, 

and to const, her a L. M 50 00 

Holliston, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, 

by W. B. Whiting 25 00 

Holyoke, First, of which $25 for Debt 

and $25, special, by J. R. Judd 50 00 

First Cci., for tne Debt, by Dea. Henry 

Caapin 16 00 

Hopkinton, by Rev. P. B. Wing 100 00 

''A. H. F." 2 80 

Housit.mic, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, 

by C. L. Giddings 15 00 

Ladies' Benev. Soc, $50; Williams- 
ville and vicinity, Friends, $37, by 

Mrs. W. Giddings 87 00 

Hyde Park, Ch., $136.01; W. H. M. U., 
$50; Y. P. s. C. E., $15.50, for the 

Debt, by J. E. Piper 201 51 

Jamaica Plain, Young Christian work- 
ers of Central Ch., by Miss M. Butler 32 00 

C. N. M. Lincoln, for the Debt 100 oo 

Lawrence, Lawrence Street Cong. Ch., 
J. H. E., $75 ; Mrs. J. H. E., $25, to 
const. G. H. Eaton and F. H. Eaton 

L. Ms 100 00 

Trinity Cong. Ch., $43.92; Ladies' 
Miss. Soc., $10.21 ; Mrs. Garland, 

$lt», by J. Hartley 64 13 

Sunday-school of South Ch., by Rev. 

C. Carter. 

Lee, Mrs. D. S. Smith, for the Debt 

Lsicester, A Thank offering 

Lenox, by E. Barrett 

"Do what you can Soc." in Cong. Ch. 

for Debt, by Carrie C. Sedgwick 

Leveretr, First, by B . M. Field 15 03 

Lowell, Legacy of Mary J. Tyler, by J. 

W. B. Shaw 

Highland Ch.', for the Debt, by N. W. 

Strout 

Pawtucket Ch.. Y. P. S. C. E.. tor the 

Dibt, by Miss L. C. Ward. . .'. 

Helping Hand Soc. of Eliot Ch., for 

the Debt, by B. G. Randall 

Mr3. G. C. Osgood 

Lynn, Central Ch., William F. Morgan, 
to const. W. F. Morgan and Emeline 

B. Morgan I;. Ms 1(0 00 

Maiden, First Ch., Y. P. S. C. E., for 

the Debt, by J. E. Higgins 5 46 

Manornett, Mrs. E. Cleveland 2 00 

Marlboro, Union Ch., by Rev. A. F. 

Newton, to const. Mrs. E. F. Johnson 

and Mrs. S. B. Pratt, L. Ms 112 12 

Marshfieid, Y. P. S. c. E., for the Debt, 

by A Friend l 00 

E. Alden. for Debt 25 00 

Medfield, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, 

by Mrs. A. L. S.inson 13 00 

Med way, E. F. Richardson 12 50 

Melrose, "Frontier Aid Soc. of Orth. 

CD.," for the Debt 25 00 

Milloury, First Ch., for the Debt, by 

C. A. Putnam 

Mittineague, Y. P. S. C. E., for the jJebt, 

by Rev. J. E. Hurlbut 

Millie, Mother and Daughter, for the 

Debt 

Milton, A Friend 

Monson, Ladies Benev. Soc. Cong. Ch., 

by Emily M. Newton 25 00 



20 50 
25 00 
5 00 

3 05 

27 00 



500 00 



7 00 
5 00 



16 00 
5 00 



20 55 
51 00 



4 00 

5 00 



N. M. Lyon, for Debt $100 00 

C. W. Holmes, Jr., for the Debt 5u CO 

Mrs. E. L. Coburn, for the Debt 10 00 

The Widow's Mite, for the Debt 5 00 

Mt. Washington, by Rev. W. F. Zell. . . 2 00 
Natick, First Ch., for the Debt, by R. H. 

Randall 

Neponset, Sunday-school of Cong. Ch., 150 00 
for Children's Bohemian fund, by 

Rev. H. A. Schaunler 6 52 

Newbury porr, A Friend 5 00 

New Bedford, Mrs. I. H. Bartlett, Jr., 

for Debt loo 00 

Newton, Eliot Ch., H. P. Kenway, $50 ; 
Alice Kenway, $5u, by D. E. Snow, to 

const. H. P. kenway a L. M 100 on 

A Friena, foi the Debt 2 oo 

Newton Center, Mrs. S. A. Howard 10 CO 

Newtonville, Y. P. S. C. E., for the 

Debt, by G. W. Auryansen 50 on 

Ladies of the Central Ch., lor Debt, 

by Mrs. W. Jones 14 00 

Mrs. A. W. Grant 20 00 

Northampton, A Friend 40 

A Friend for Oebt ."> on 

Noith Andover, Ch.. $85, by J. S. San- 
born, to const. Mrs. Carrie Wilson a 
L. M.; Ladies' Praying Circle, $53, to 
const. Mrs. Stella M. Barker a L. M., 

for Debt 13S 00 

North Attleboro, Miss L. A. Adams, $2; 
Mrs. J. G. Hull, 10c, Miss L. McLeod, 

inc., by Miss L. A. Adams 2 20 

Northboro, Y. P. S. C. E., $11.55; Ly- 
man Soc. ,$5; Sunday-school, $10, of 
Evan. Ch., for the Debt, by W. s. Har- 
rington 26 55 

From a Friend of Home Missions of 

which, $25, for the Debt 50 00 

Northbridge, Y. P. S. C. F., for Debt, 

by R. M. Brown 5 00 

North Brooktield, Ladies of First Ch., 

Woman's Dep:., by Mrs. H. M. Nye. . 80 00 
North Hatfield, Cong. Sunday-school, 
$8 ; A Friend, $1 for Debt, by Mrs. O. 

Beiden 9 00 

North Chelmsford, Second, by A. H. 
Sheldon, to const. A. H. Sheldon and 

Mrs. C. R. Sprague L. Ms 100 00 

North Dana, M. P. Estey, for the Debt 1 oo 
Norton, Trin. Ch. and Soc, $108.28; 
Ladies' Miss. Soc. $25 ; Sunaa*- 

school, $5 138 28 

Orange, Central Cn., for the Debt, by 

H.W.Foster 10 00 

Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, by Mrs. 

G. P. Metcalf. 15 00 

Palmer, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, to 
const. Mrs. J. S. Holden a L. M., by 

H. W. Pope 5C 00 

The last gift ot Elery Hastings, de- 
ceased—age nine years— by his 

parents 7 00 

PiUsfleld, Mrs. Pbineas Allen, Birth- 
day offering, for Debt, by J. F. Allen 20 00 
Reading, Y. P. S. C. E. of Cong. Ch., 

for Debt, by Minnie E. Dewey 7 74 

Roxoury, Mrs. H. B. Hooker, special.. 5 00 

Randolph, Miss Abby W. Turner 100 00 

Salem, Legacy of Eiizabetu B. Mans- 
field, by N B. Mansfield and J. C. 

Osgood, Exs 1,000 00 

Saundersville. Amanda P., for Debt. . . lo 00 
Sheltield, Special coll., by fl. Dutton.. 26 81 

South Amherst, by C W.Shaw 6 34 

Southbridge, for the Debt, by F. W. 

Eaton 34 50 

South Egremont, Ladies' Sew. Soc. of 
Cong Cn., for Debt, by Rev. C. H. 

Keyser 10 On 

For the Debt, by A. M. Smith 17 60 

South Hadley, Mrs. M. A. Hooker, for 

the Debt 5 00 

South Natick, Y. P. S. C. E., for the 

Debt, by Miss J. L. Dehm 5 00 

Southville, Rev. J. Le Bosquet and 
wife, $1 ; Susie R. Le Busuuet, $1 ; S. 
M. Perkins and wife, $1 3 00 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



27 



Spencer, Legacy of Lucy Prouty,by D. 

I'rout v, Kx $4, 

V. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, by P. A. 

Drury 

Springfield, V. P. S. C. K. of North 

Oh., for the Debt, by a. B. Blodgett. 

Memorial Ch., Y. P. 8. <'. E., for 
the Debt, by P. H. Siciiliins 

s Morris Coe, for Debt 

A Friend 

Sterling, Suaday-achool class, for the 

Debt, by E. A. Wilder 

Stockbrldge, Alice Byington, for Debt.. 

"A Lady Friend" 

A Lady, for the Debt 

Stoughton, \V. 1). \Y., for the Debt... 
Taunton, Wiuslow Y". P. S. O. E., for 

the Debt. by B. K. Dean 

Rev. s. 11. and Mrs. J. K. Emery, for 

the Debt 

I'xbridge, Legacy of Mrs. A. H. Tuek- 

er, bv Jacob Taf t, Ex 1 

Ware, 'East Ch., William Hyde, $25n : 

Mrs. Fanny Green, $2 ; Mrs. J. L. Gil- 
bert, $2, for the Debt, by Hon. Wil- 
liam Hvde 

Warren, Estate of Emily S. Gleason, 

deceased, to const. Julia 0. Smith a 

L. M., by R. T. Gleason 

To const. Rev. D. O. Clark and R. P. 
Bestie L. Ms., by E. W. Butter worth 

Cn. and Y. P. s. C. E., for the Debt, 
to const, a L. M., by M. D. R >ok- 

wojd 

WatertowD, Y. P. S. C. E., for the De >t 
Webster, First, for Debt, by E. L. Spal- 
ding 

Wellesley Hills, C 

Westboro, Susan M. Miller, for Debt. . . 

West Boylston, C. T. White 

West Brookiield, E. W 

Vestiield. First, for Debt, by -Miss Lucy 

(.'. Smith '. 

Mary E. Rood, Woman's Dept 

Westminster, M. A. Warner 

We3t Newton, C. B. Richardson, for the 

Deot 

West Springfield, Mrs. L. M. Bagg, for 

the Debt 

Wmtiusville, Mrs. M. F. W. Abbott, for 

the Debt 

WliliatnstowD, First, $15. 9.'; for tue 

Debt. $66.79, by C. S. Cole 

Rev. J. H. Denison. for Debt 

Wobarn, Y". P. S. C. E., for the Debt, by 

C . E. Richardson 

A Friend, for Deb'. 

Worcester, Salem Street, for the Debt, 

by E. A. Tucker 

Pilgrim Ch.. Miss. 80c, for the Debt, 
by Mrs . C. Duckworth 

11. M. Wheeler, for Debt 

Rev. A. J. W., for the Debt 

A Widow's Mite, for Debt, H. H. S.... 

Friends 

RHODE ISLAND-*!. 547. 02. 

Rhode Islaud Home Miss. Soc *$3 

Central Falls, Y*. P. S. C. E., for the 

Debt, by Miss D. A. Allen 

East Providence. Sam'l Bslden, to const. 
Rev. R. DsWitt Mallory, Jjhn H. Mat- 
toon and Grattoa Pelton L,. Ms 

Kingston, Sunday-school, for Children's 

Bjnemiau work, by N. Helme 

Newpirt, United Cong. Ch.'.from Dame! 
B. Fitts, in memoriam, for the Debt, 

by S. McAdam 1. 

Providence. Benehcen: Ch., A Lady 

Member 

Central Ch.. Y. P. S. C. E., for the 

Debt, by H. Fuller 

Academy Avenue Ch., bv Rev. A. L. 

Kelley 

Y"oung Ladies" Mission Band of Be- 
neficent Ch., for the Debt, i>v Mary 
£. Lamprey 



001) 


re 


110 


00 


110 


25 


56 


26 


5 


00 


20 


00 


2 


oe 


too 


nO 


5 


III! 


5 


nil 


1 


00 


60 00 


10 


00 


,200 00 



50 00 


100 00 


50 00 
26 00 


35 00 
25 no 

I 0! 
4 (0 
1 00 


100 00 
5 00 
5 00 


5 00 


15J CO 


5 OH 


82 71 
1O0 CO 


37 50 
3 00 


87 9U 


10 12 

25 00 

2 00 

5 00 

5 00 


OH 74 


150 50 


150 00 


10 no 


000 00 


15 00 


119 17 


15 00 



A Friend, f >r Debt $20 00 

A Friend, for the Debt 5 00 

Tiverton, Ann E. Brown, for Debt 5 00 

Four Corners, A Friend, 410 : for the 

Debt, bv J. q. A. Brown, $5 15 00 

Westerly, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, 

by G.L. Clark 17 35 

CONNECTICUT— $8,500.27. 
Missionary Society of Connecticut... "$14,057 02 
Miss. Soc. of Conn., w. w. Jacobs, 
Treas., by Rev. W. II. Moore, Sec... 557 55 

Received by P. T. Jarman : 
Eaai Haven, Ch., to const. Rev. 

1). .}. Clark a L. M J52 3,6 

New Haven, J. M. B. D wight... 11 00 
United Ch., A Friend, $2 ; A 
Friend, 50 cts 2 so 

A Frieinl 6 00 

North Guilford, cn.. in full to 

const. Rev. F. R. Kahler a L. 

M 50 06 

Westville, I. S. Dickerman 10 00 

131 92 

Re ::eived by Mrs. S. M. Hotchkiss, 

Sec. SVoman's Home Miss. Union 

of Conn.: 

Bridgeport, Ladies' Soc. of 

North Ch $75 00 

Huntington, Ladies of Cong. Ch. 10 o> 
Pomfret, Ladies' H. M. Soc, for 

the Debt 6 00 

Wallingford, Ladies' Bene v.Soc, 

for the Debt 5? 00 

— — 141 00 

Andover, Two Friends, for the Deb". . . us »,o 

Ansonia. Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, by 
H. C. Fjsdick 35 00 

Berlin, Woman's H. M. ottering, $63 ; 
W. S. Bntndegee, $50 ; Y r . P. S. C. E., 
$7, for the Debt, by Mrs. W. W. Wood- 
worth 120 

Bethel, A Fneod, for the Debt 5 

Birmingham, Y. P. S. C. E., for the 

Debt, by Rev. C. W. Part S3 

G. W. Snelton, for the Debt 5 

Branford, A FrieDd 2 

Bridgeport, Second, ada'l, by O. H. 

Broth well 96 32 

Sundiv-school, by E. W. Marsh 50 00 

Y. P. S. O. E. of South Ch., by L. E. 

Clarke 67 00 

Y. P. S. C. E. of Olivet Ch., for the 

Debt, by Rev. E. K. Holden 1 85 

A Friend, for Debt 4 40 

Bristol, Ch.,$99; Sundav-school class, 
$5 ; Y~. P. S. C. E, $26, for Debt ; For 

Gen. worK, $75, by H. Beckwith 205 00 

Thank offering for the Debt, from 
children and grandchildren cf Mrs. 
E. C. Brewster, by N. L. Brewster. 2C 00 
E. B. Dunbar, by Rev. A. Anderson. 5 00 
Rev. A. Anderson 100 

Brooklyn. First Trinity Co., iu full, to 
const. William Woodbridge a L. M., 
by M. W. Crosby 42 00 

Canaan. A Friend in First Ch., for 
Debt, by Rev. D. M. Moare 15 00 

Canton Center, Ladies' Bene v. Soc, for 

the Debt, by Mrs. W. G. Hallock 5 00 

Y. P. S. C. E. of Cong. Ch., for Debt, 

by B. T. Coe 20 00 

Chaplin. Mrs. M. H. Dorrance, $25; 
Miss J. W. Cro3lev, $50, to const. 
herself a L. M. ; H. T. Crosby, $5, f ir 
the Debt 80 00 

Cheshire, by A. C. Peck 30 00 

C. E. Soc, by E. H. Ball win 2 50 

A Friend 25 00 

Colchester, Mrs. C. C. Destin, $2 ; Miss 

Lottie T. Destin, $1 3 00 

A Friend 10 00 

Columbia, Sundav-school, for the Debt, 
$20; A Friend, $1, by J. Hutchins.... 21 00 

Cornwall, Second Cn. Y r . P. S. C. E., 
for the Debt, by E. L. Dean 5 00 

Coventry, Mrs. B. T. Preston, for Debt 5 00 



28 



THE HOME MISSIONAKY. 



May, 



Cromwell, Ch., for Debt, by R. B. 
Savage $50 00 

Danbury, Mission Circle of the First 
Cong. Sunday-school, for the Chil- 
dren's Bohemian Fund, by W. A. 
Gordon 65 00 

Danielsonville, J. Waldo 15 00 

Darien, Mrs. M. E. Gleason, for Chil- 
dren's Bohemian Fund 40 

East Hampto.i, First Ch., in full, to 
const. A. H. Conklin, H. Clark and 
Mrs. G. Jones L. Ma., by S. Skinner. 44 06 
P. Bevin. for Debt 25 00 

East Hartford, First, by E. A. Wil- 
liams, of which for Debt, $23 TO f0 

East Windsor, Mrs. S. L. ,Vells 5 00 

East Woodstock, Mis. S. E. A. Carr, 
for the Debt 2 00 

Ellington, by E. C. Chapman, to const. 
Rev. W. T. Hutching and A. A. 

Hyde L. Ms 137 05 

Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, by C. H. 
West 11 00 

Enfield, Gleaners' MiSfeion Circle, in 
part, for L. M., by Mrs. F. B. Gowdy 25 00 

Fair Haven, ada'J, $15.22 ; Y. P. S. C. 
E., for the Debt, *S.25, by J. Blakeslee 23 47 

Glastonbury, F'irst, by J. B. Moseley.. 105 S5 
W. S. Williams, for the Debt 200 00 

Greenwich, Second Cong. Sunday- 
school, for the Debt, by M. B. Wright 63 31 
.Mrs. Mary C. Brush, for Debt 5 00 

Griswold, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, 
byC.H. Peck 13 00 

Guilford, First Ch., to const. Mrs. Mary 

E. Leete a L. M., by E. W. Leete 50 00 

K. H. Dudley 5 00 

Hampton, for the Debt, by Rev. D. 

Denison 20 00 

Cong. Ch., in full, to const. Dea. 
Joseph W. Congdou a L. M., by 
Miss S. S. Tappen 30 25 

Hartford, Asylum Hill ch., for Debt, 

by C. E. Thompson 50 g 

U. F. B., for Debt, by C. E. Thomp- 
son 5 00 

Young People of Asylum Hill Ch,, by 

C. E. Thompson, for the Debt 56 00 

Warburton Cnapel, special 9 05 

Boys' Chr. Assoc, of First Ch., for the 

Det t, by H. H. Taintor 25 00 

Charles T. Hiliyer l.uoo 00 

Mrs. A. W. Barrows, for the Debt... 25 00 

Mrs. J. R. Loomis 10 00 

A Friend, by a. H. Taintor 150 

Harwinton, •' Try in Earnest Club," by 
L. E. Hayes 8 25 

Higganum, by R. J. Gladwin 20 00 

Sunday-school, for the Debt, by Mrs. 

D. Huntington 36 00 

Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, by O. J. 
Brainerd 5 00 

Hockanum, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, 
by Rev. F. K. Wait 15 00 

Huntington, B. N. S 1 60 

Kensington, Y. P. S. C. E., for the 
Debt, by H. C. Cowles 6S 61 

Kent, Y. P. S. C. E.. $15.20 ; Ch., $10.84, 
for the Debt, by Miss M. A. Hopson . . 26 04 

Lakeville, A Friend for Debt 50 CO 

Lebanon, Goshen Soc, by E. Geer 27 50 

Three Ladies, for Debt, by Miss Julia 
R. Maxwell 15 00 

Litchfield, A Friend, for Debt 5 00 

A Friend, for Woman's Dept 5 00 

Manchester, Mrs. L. W. Robbing 5 00 

Meriden, Ch., by W. H. Catlin, to const. 
Mrs. T. S. Rust, N. J. Linsley, L. H. 
White, C. L. Nagel, L. A. Taylor, and 
N. M. White L. Ms., $300 ; Y. P. S. C. 
E., for the Debt, $121, to const. H. L. 
Devereux and Lillian B. Smith, L. 
Ms 42100 

Middlebury, Y. P. S. c. E., for the 
Debt, by J. L. Townsend 5 00 

Middletown, Ladies' H. M. Soc, First 
Ch., by Miss C. M. Bacon 12 00 



South Ch., by E. Douglas $251 87 

Dea. S. Goodrich, by C. A. Boardman 10 00 

W. M. Dean 5 00 

A. B. C 5 00 

Monroe, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, by 

Miss H. L. Curtiss 8 25 

" Afesv frieDds." for the Debt 25 00 

Morris, D. W. Whittlesey 5 00 

Mt. Carmel, Mrs. J. M. Swift, for Debt 2 00 

New Britain, First, Y. P. S. C. E., for 

the Debt, by A. C.Blake 17 50 

South Ch., to const. Mrs. J. S. Fenton 
a L. M.. $263.53; Miss Maria Kelsey, 
$5; A Friend, $11.50, bv W. H. Hart 2S0 03 
South Ch., Rev. C. E. Steele's Sun- 
day-school class 7 54 

Y'oung men in Sunday-schcol of South 
Ch., for the Debt, by Miss E. R. 
Eastman 20 CO 

New Haven, First, Y. P. S. C. E.,for 

the Debt, by Rev . B . Hart 25 00 

Y. P. S. C. E., of Humphrey Street 

Ch.. for the Debt, by H. P. Sharer. 256 50 
Y. P. S. C. E. and Sunday-school of 
United CO., forthe Debt, by E.P.Mur- 
ray 150 00 

Dwight Place. Y. P. S. C. E., for the 

Debt, by J. Y. McDermott 80 00 

Infant class, by Y. P. S. C. £., add'l, 

by Rev. B. Hart 4 25 

Westville Ch., by Rev. J. L. Willard. 24 25 

Davenport, Ch., by C. E. Hart 55 36 

A. Walker lo 00 

Rev. C. L. Kitchel 5 00 

M. Werden, for the Debt. l 00 

AFriend . 10 00 

New London, First, by C. D. Boss, Jr.. 84 91 
First, Mrs. Robert McEwen, to corst. 

W. L. Raub and C. P. Tinker L.Me. 100 00 
Second, $92.31 ; Sundav-school, $18.76, 

for Debt, by f. G. Porter Ill 07 

Mrs. L. E. L., Woman's Dept 25 00 

AFiiend, for Debt 50 00 

A Lady, Woman's Dept 50 00 

New Milford, Y. P. S. C. E., tor the 
Debt, by F. E. Mygatt , 5114 

New Preston, Y.P.S.C.E., for the Debt 

by Lizzie M. Whittlesey 100 

Rev. H . Upson 5 00 

Norfolk, Ch. and Y.P.S.C.E., Gen. 
fund, $150 ; for Debt, $60.82, by J. N. 

Cowles 210 82 

By Rev. J. DePue 2(0 00 

NorthBranford,$5.W; Y.P.S.C.E., for 
the Debt, by C. Page 15 52 

Northiield, for the Debt, by H. C. Peck 25 00 

North Haven, Mrs. Cornelia B. Page, 
to const, B. E. Page a L. M., for Debt. 50 00 

North Manchester, Second, of which 
$25 for the Debt, by G. M. Griswold 275 00 

North Stonington, A Friend for Debt,. 40 00 
AFriend 1 00 

Norwalk, " H." 10 00 

Norwich, Broadway Ch., B. W. Tomp- 
kins, to const. Rev. N. Millard, D.D., 
and Rev. S. W. Howe, D.D., L. Ms. . 100 00 
Y. P. S. C. E., of First Ch., for the 

Debt, by L. A. Hyde 50 00 

C. H. M., for the Debt 10 00 

H. G.R 5 00 

Plainville, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, 
of which $25 : from Dea, W. Cowles 
bal. to const, himself a L. M., by Miss 
H. M. Pierce 120 00 

Plantsville, by E. P. Hotchkiss 18 61 

Sunday-school, for the Debt, by E. N. 

Walkley 25 00 

Mrs. E. P. Hotchkiss, for Debt 2 00 

Plymouth, Ch. special coli. for Debt, by 
A. Beardsley 65 5S 

Pomfret, Sunday-school, for the Debt, 
by Mrs. C. C. Williams 37 63 

Pomfret Center, Miss J. T. Ripley, for 
Debt 6 30 

Putnam, Second, by H. N. Fenn 22 64 

Mrs.H. G. Shaw, forthe Debt 5 60 

Redding, $15; Huntington, L. I., A 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



29 



Friend, $5 for the Debt, i.v Rev. W.J. 

Jennings $20 00, 

Ridgelield, First Co.. $5.08; Y.P.8.C.E 

$18, by Rev W. w. Leete . 

Rockviile, by B.C. Chapman 

Second Cong. Sunday-school, for the 

Debt, by 8. T. Noble 

Salem, for Debt, Mrs. E. IS. and Miss 

E. C. Fox 

Salisbury, a Mend, for Debt '. 

Sangatuck, Miss Mary K. Atkinson, for 

Debt 

Scotland, by Rev. (J. A. Brvan... . 
Sontblngton, Y. P. s. c. E. of the First 

Cb., $16; A Friend, $5, for Debt, by 

Miss Mary E. (iridlev 

Stamford, First, by E. B. Hoit. .. 
Stratford, Y . P. S. C. K 

For Debt, Mrs. Peter Curtiss 

Taleottville, Y. P. S. C. E., for toe 

Debt, by Taleott Bros 

Terryville, Ch.,$55; Y. P. S. C. E., for 

the Debt, $9, by G. M. Allen 

Tbomaston, y. p. s. c. e., for Debt, by 

11. A. Welton 

Cong. Sunday-school, by A. Stough- 

ton 

Thompson, bv Rev. M. T. Towne 
Torringford, for the Debt, by 0. H. 

Barber 

Union ville, First Ch., by George Dun- 
ham 

Wallingford, Y. P. S. C. E., for the 

Debt, by A. L. Judd 

Miss J. Beadle, for Debt 

Waterbury, "A." 

Watertown, Cong. Sunday-school, by 

F. M . Loveland 

Westford, S. S. Stowell 

West Hartford, Mrs. Mary A. Butler. 

for Debt, bv AY. II. Hall 

Mrs. C. R. Swift, for Debt 

West Hartland, Rev. H. N. Gates, for 

the Debt 

West Haven, Cong. Sunday-school, for 

the Debt, by W. H. Mouitlirop 

Mrs. P. K. Smith, for the Debt 

Mrs. E. C. Kimball 

Westminster, Rev. S. B. Carter and 

wife, $12 ; for the Children's funJ for 

Bohemian work, $2 

West Redding, Mrs. J. H. Meeker, for 

Debt 

West Torrington, A. M. Doolittie,"for 

the Debt 

West Woodstock, by A. W. Bickneli... 

West vide, A Friend, special 

Wethersfleld, Y. P. S. C. E., for the 

Debt, by F.E.Stone 13 00 

Wilton, A Friend, by Rev. J. G. Daven- 
port, to const. Carrie A. D. Whitlock 

„? L - M 50 (10 

\\ inddam. A Friend 1 00 

Windsor, Y. P. s. C. E. of First Ch., for 

the Debt, by C. H. Slocum 50 00 

Windsor Locks, Casn, for Debt 10 uo 

Wolcott, Suuday-3chool, for the Debt, 

bv Miss M. R. Hough 6 00 

Woodbiidge, $12.35; Sunday-school, 

$30, for the Debt, by R. C. Newton ... 42 35 
NEW YORK— $S,437.93; of which Lega- 
cy, ? 2,( 4S.2S. 

Received by Mrs. L. H. Cobb, Treas. 
Woman's H. M. Union : 
Albany, Ladies' Aux., special. $30 00 
Binghamtou, W. H. M. Soc, to 

const. Mrs. Harmon C. Riggs 

a L. M., special, of wbic i $25 

i ir Woman's Dept., and $25, 

special 50 no 

Brooklyn, Central Cti., special 25 On 

Copenhagen, lor the Debt 3 00 

Harford, Ladies' Aux 9 00 

Homer, Ladies' B. M. Soc, of 

which* $5 from Mrs. B. W. 

Payne 25 00 I 



23 08 
13 08 


80 00 


10 00 
5 00 


10 00 
32 58 


20 00 

25 44 

5 00 

5 00 


50 00 


64 00 


20 00 


14 24 
30 60 


12 To 


35 S6 


15 00 
1 40 
1 00 


25 00 
5 00 


20 00 
3 00 


10 00 


14 16 
2 00 
6 00 


14 00 


20 00 


5 00 
4 85 
10 CO 



Poughkeepsie, Ladies' II. M. 

Soc, for Debt $25 00 

Kivernead, W. II. M.. Soc, 

Woman's Dept 25 oo 

Warsaw, Ladies' aux. Soc, for 

the Debt 17 50 

$209 50 

Albany, First, by W. Gould. Jr 151 86 

Misst;. II. Learned, lor Debt 30 00 

lion. W. L. Learned 25 00 

Angola, Mrs. II. D. Gaslay, contents of 

the Family Miss. Box 4 00 

Antwerp, First, by A. Iloyt 38 50 

Cong. Sunday-school, by A . Hoyt 17 oo 

Binghamton, Mrs. G. A. Price 20 00 

A Friend 5 00 

Bridgewater, Ch., $16; Ladies' Miss. 

Soc, $10, by Rev. J. Marsland 26 oo 

Brier Hill, Y. P. 8. C. E., for Debt, $8; 
Miss Mariah Young, a birthday offer- 
ing, $1 9 00 

Brooklyn, Ch. of the Pilgrims, by J. P. 

Dike 966 47 

Rochester Avenue Ch., to const. Dea. 
John Fraser a L. M., by Rev. J. G. 

Roberts, D.D 60 30 

A Lady, for Woman's Dept., $10 ; 
From a Tenth box, $1 ; A Lady 
Friend, $5 ; A Friend, $2 ; A Friend, 
$5; A Friend, for Woman's Dept., 
$1.25 ; A. Z. Cobb, for the Debt, $1 ; 
B. L. Benedict, for the Debt, i25 ; 
W. H. Williams, for the Debt, $25. . 75 25 
Buffalo, Pilgrim Cr., Y. P. S. C. E., for 

the Debt, by F. A. Warren 12 00 

Cambridge, Sunday-school, for the 

Debt, by Rev. H. G. Blinn 10 00 

Canandaigua, for the Debt, by E. G. 

Tyler 50 00 

Candor, E. A. Booth, for the Debt 25 00 

By Rev. C. C. Johnson 50 00 

Catskill, Mrs. H. E. Prentice 2 00 

Clifton Springs, E. M. Duff, a Birthday 

offering 10 00 

Copenhagen, by Rev. W .J. Cuthbertson 25 00 
Crown Point, First, $23.81 ; Mrs. Deane's 

Sunday-school class, $ 1 . 75 25 56 

Cutchogue, Mrs. Wickham 20 P0 

Essex, A Friend 50 00 

Farmersville Station, by Rev. E. Rob- 
erts 20 00 

Flat bush, Mrs. S. K. Thurston 6 00 

Flushing, Frances A. Janes, for Debt.. . 10 00 

Foit Covington, "A. P." 1 00 

Franklin, Ch. and Y. P. S. C, E., for the 

Debt, bv G. Mann 20 00 

Gilbertsville, Rev. A. Wood 10 00 

Ithaca, by Miss C. Atwater 31 30 

Jamesport, by Rev. W. Hedges 5 CO 

Jamestown, W. A. Keeler 10 00 

Joidanville, C. F. W., for the Debt 5 00 

Lewis and Wadhams Mills, by Rev. A. 

R. Crawford 8 00 

Lawrenceville, L. Hulburd 5 00 

Middletown, First, $39.26; Y. P. S. C. 
E., for the Debt, $3.i 8, by S. R. Corwin. 42 34 
Cong. Sunday-school, by F. P. S. 

Crane 28 34 

Mt. Sinai, for the Debt, by Rev. E. A. 

Hazeltine 8 5) 

Nassau, Miss E. G. Means, for the 

Debt 5 00 

Newark Valley, Sunday-school, for the 

Debt, by C. Frank 8 00 

New York City, Broadway Tabernacle 
Ch.. in part, by I. R. Fisher, Treas., 
$1,699.90; A. H. C. and wife, $250 ; C. 
F. Browning, $200 ; C. N. Bliss, $100 ; 
A. C. Armstrong, $30; C. F. Ravnor, 
$20; S. M. Knevals, $5; C. B. Kne- 
vals, $10; Mrs. T. II. Skinner, $5 .... 2,319 90 
Soc. of Inq. of the Union Theo. Sem., 
bv A. H. Evans, of which for Debt, 

$4.50 35 25 

W. S. Opdyke, for the debt, $25 ; A 
Friend. $1 ; A Friend, $20; "A Lit- 
tle Extra," from Mrs. H. M. S.,$10; 



30 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



May, 



s. B. 8., $26; H. S. C, $200 : A. M. 
R., $50 ; M. W. Lyon, $25 ; C. L. A., 
for Debt. $2; Mrs. Josephine M. 
Ayer, through the Ladies' H. M. 
Soc. of t'ne Ch. of the Pilgrims, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., by Mrs. P. McCar- 

tee,$750 $1,108 00 

Norwich, Mrs. R. A. Barber, in Me- 

moriam, for Debt 5 00 

North Lawrence, Louisa Barnes, dec. 5 00 

Mrs. Nancy Williams 100 

Ogdensbur2h, Y. P. S. C. E. of First 
Ch., for Debt, by R. P. Alden, Sec. 5 00 

Orient, by M. B. Brown 9 36 

Patchogue, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, 

by J. E. Gerrodelte 4 25 

A Friend, for ttie Debt 2 99 

Perry Center, Legacy of Marthi B. 

Sheldon, by M. A. Baiber, Ex 2,048 28 

Perm Yan, C. C. Sheppard 500 00 

Philadelphia, by Rev. A. S. Wood 25 00 

Pulaski, by Rev. C. C. Creegan 18 66 

Rensselaer Falls, Esther Dart 2 00 

Miss E. Spoontr,5oc; A Thank offer- 
ing, $1, by J. J. Doty 150 

Rutland, First Cong. Sunday-school, 

by F. Underwood 15 00 

Saratoga Springs, Sundav-school, $8; 
Y. P. S. C. E.. $7, for Bohemian work 

and Debt, by Mrs. S. M.Jones 15 00 

Misses M. L. Bailey and Eleanor 

Bailey 2 00 

Seneca Falls, First, by W. L. Bellows. 21 00 

Summer Hill, by Rev. C. H. Curtis 5 47 

Union Fails, F. E. Duncan 18 04 

Upperville, Sunday-School, bv H. M. 

Dixon ". 10 00 

Walton, First, by G. W. Fitch 72 00 

Warsaw, Ccng. Sunday-school, by H. 
R. Bristol, to const. Rev. A. *■. Pierce 

a L. M., for the Debt 50 00 

Waterville, Welsh Ch., for the Debt, by 

Rev. T. Jenkins 10 00 

Westmoreland, by J. Bell 17 02 

West Win held, by S. Bonfoy 15 17 

Wilmington, by Rev. D. Fish 5 06 

NEW JERSEY— $1,194.92. 

Arlington, J. B. Peck $10 0(1 

Closter, Cb., by Rev. G. W. Fla< k 10 00 

Camden, Mrs. F. W. Cowles, add'l, for 

Debt 5 oo 

East Orange, L. F. Hovey 10 00 

Elizabeth, Y. P. S. C. E. and Bible Band 
cf First CO., for the Debt, by E. G. De- 

derick 25 00 

Iivmgton, R. S. Underwood, $35; Mrs. 
R. S. Underwood, $15, to const. Mrs. 

Harriet, W. Kent a L. M 50 oo 

Montclair, First Co., by F. T. Bailev, 
$410.23; E. Sweet, $10o; S. Wilde, $20; 
Cong. Sunday-school, by T. H. Bou- 

den,$100 G30 23 

New Brunswick, Mary H. Parker, for 

the Debt 5 00 

Newark, Belleville Avenue Y. P. S. C. 
E., for the Debt, by Miss Kittle Deni- 

son 32 81 

Aged Life Member, Tnank-offering... 5 00 

Horace Day 5 00 

F. M 1 50 

F. M 3 00 

Orange, Trinity Ch ., by R. D. Weeks. .. 274 57 

Paterson, by J. Chase 13 11 

Riveiton , Rev. J. H. Frazee, for the 

Debt 5 00 

Stanley, by Rev. R. S. Stone S 00 

Summit, Central Pres. Ch.. A Friend.. 25 00 

Westfleld, by J. R. Connoly 62 61 

Woodbridge, by O. S. Vooroees 20 S5 

Newark Assoc, by Rev.C. Noble 3 24 

PENNSYLVANIA -$217.40. 

Corry, by Rev. E. H.Martin 25 00 

Drif ton, A Friend 6 34 

Edwardsdale, Y. P. S. C. E., Welsh. Ch. 

for Debt, by Charlotte Davies 5 00 

Glade Ran, by Rev. s. Rowland 7 00 



Guv's Mills, Woman's H. M. Soc, $5: 
Mrs. K. 8. Smith, $1 ; Mrs. F. M. Guy, 

$1, by Mrs. F. M. Guy $87 CO 

Maharioy Citv, Welsh Ch., Infant class 
ot Sunday-school, for the Debt, by 

Miss S. Jeffries 10 00 

Mt. Carmel, by Rev. D. D. Davies 12 00 

Philadelphia. Roxboro, A Friend 10 00 

Pottsville, Welsli Cong. Sunday-school, 

for Debt, by Rev. D. T. Davies 23 00 

Riceville, $3.83; Centerville, $1.57, by 

Rev. F. W. Westpfah] 5 40 

Young Ladies' H. M. Soc, for Debr, 

by Clara B. Westgate 3 00 

Ridgewav, First Ch., Ladies' Miss. Cir- 
cle, bv J. T. Waid 18 56 

Scranton, Plymouth CD., bv T. Eynon. . 10 38 
Plymouth Ch., Thank-oflerin?, lor the 

Debt, by T. Eynon 63 72 

Sunday-school class, by "A Miner 

Boy" 3 00 

Slatington, by Rev. W. fi. Jones 6 00 

West Bangor, bv Rev. J. Cadwalader.. 2 0O 
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA- $355.75. 
Mt. Carmel, add'l, $1.50; Mt. Pleasant, 

$68.50, by Rev. C. H. Small 70 00 

Washington, Tab. Ch., by Rev. W. C. 

Scofleld 7 50 

J. W. Rice, a Thank-offering, tor 
Debt, $25; Mrs. N. A. Thacher, for 

Debt,$12 37 00 

Firtt, by S. H. Galpin 200 00 

Ladies' H. M. Soc. of First Ch., 

spt-cial, by Miss L. Patterson 16 25 

"Old Member," for the Debt 5 00 

Rev. E. Whittlesey, in full, to const. 

Geo. P. Whittlesey aL. M 20 oo 

MARYLAND— $323.92. 

Baltimore, First, by M. Hawley 223 92 

Maryland, A Friend, for Debt 100 oo 

VIRGINIA— $28.91. 
Falls Church, by Rev. B. W. Pond .... 14 66 

By Rev. F. W. Tuckerman 14 25 

WEST VIRGINIA— $3.06. 

Huntington, by Rev, G. Martin 3 06 

GEORGIA— $172.00. few. 

Atlanta, Ladies' Union of the Ch. of the 
Redeemer, m Memoriaro, bv Mrs. F. 

C. Wade 62 00 

Thomasville, Mrs. E. Hackett, in Me- 
nioriam, to const. Miss Abbie F. 
Cram and Mrs. Harriets. Tidd L. Ms., 

$100 ; special, $10 110 00 

ALABAMA— $41.50. 
Shelbv Iron Works, Evau. Ch., for tte 

Debt, by Rev. . I. S. Upton .... 4150 

LOUISIANA— $2.50. 
Jennings, by Rev. J. A. Jones 2 50 

ARKANSAS— $42.03. 
Cherokee City, by Rev. W. H. Lewis.. 2 CO 

Eureka Springs, Mrs. A. J. Morris 10 00 

Rogers, $15.03 ; Mrs. Croswell, $5, by 

Rev. M. S. Croswell 20 03 

Rev. M. S. Croswell 5 00 

Siloam Springs, Mrs. M. H. Copeland.. 5 00 
TENNESSE E— $25.00. 
Knoxville, Plymouth Ch., by S. C. 

RMney 25 00 

FLORIDA— $317.62. 
ADopka, $4.35 ; Jacksonville, $5 ; Winter 

Park, $110.86. bv F. W. Lyman 120 21 

Btf Rev. W. T. Richardson 5 65 

Georgiana, F. W. Munson and wife — 1 00 
Interlachen, Rev. J. Porter, D.D., by J. 

W. Porter 25 00 

Norwalk, by Rev. B. T. Stafford 2 50 

Pomona, by Rev. M. C. Welch 15 no 

Port Orange, by Rev. D. M. Brecken- 

ridge 8 26 

Sanf'Td, Mrs. MosesLyman 10 00 

Tampa, by F.J. Pettingell 30 CO 

Winter Park, F. W. Lyman, for the 

Debt, to const. Mrs. A. Rogers and 
m Mrs. E. I. Coan L. Ms 100 oe 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



31 



TEXAS— $31. '25. 

Palestine, by Rev. E. F. Kales 

Sherman, by Rev. W. A. Byde 

INDIAN TERRITORY— $6.00. 

McAllister, by Rev. G. 11. Brown 

NEW MEXICO— $10.00. 

LaBarca, Rev. EL m. Bisseil 

San Mateo, Rev. \V. C. Montgomery 
OHIO— $1,963.39. 
Received by Rev. . T . G. Fraser: 
Alliance, $9 ; Sun<lay-Bcliool,$2, 

by Rev. J. M. Thomas $11 

Ashtabula .5 

Belden, by E. Killip 6 

Bellevue, by Rev. A. P. John- 
son 32 

Berlin Heights 3 

Woman's Miss. Soc 2 

Brookliehl, Welsh Ch., by J. L. 

Thomas 8 

Canfleld, by Rev. J. S. Whit- 
man 13 

Cincinnati, Central Ch., add'], 

by Horace Stacy 22 

Sunday-school, by Horace 

Stacy 14 

Fitchville, Second, by John 

Bigelow 2 

Freedom, by Rev. J. R. Nich- 
ols 9 

Greenwich, by W. A. Hossler. . 15 

Lafayette 6 

Madison, Central, A Friend 10 

Marysville, by W. P. Anderson 15 
Medina, Special, by Rev. W. 

S. Ament 26 

Parkman, by A. D. Willmot... 6 

Pierpont, by E. B. Pitcher 4 

Radnor, Welsh Ch., by John 

Powell 11 

Ravenna, by Rev. S. W. Meek 2S 

Troy, by E. E. Pratt 5 

Twinsburgh, Mrs. L. S. Buell, 

for Debt 

Wakeman, Sunday-school, by 

S. H. Todd 

Wayne, by Rev. J. B. Davison. 

York 

Zanesville, by E. A. Farquuar, 

Jr 

Sunday-school, by Rev. I. W. 

Metcalf 

Sunday Special Collections... 



10 00 



Received by S. P. Churchil!, 
Treas. Bohemian Board, Cleve- 
land. Feb.: 

Cleveland, First $25 00 

Refunded 23 41 

Cuyahoga Falls, Sunday-school 5 47 

Hudson, Mrs. C. M. Bran 5 00 

Madison, Mrs. H. B. Fraser 50 00 

Sandusky, Sunday-school 3 00 

111 88 
March : 

Anonymous $3 00 

Cleveland, Plymouth Sunday- 
school, Miss C. M. Smith's 

class 4 00 

Mesopotamia 3 00 

North Bloomfield, Union Sun- 
day-school 1 00 

O. W. H. M. Union, special... 51 71 

Wayne, O. H. M.S., special 1 00 

Sunday-school 19 00 

Winchester, Mass., A Friend.. 5 00 

87 71 
Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. E. 
J. Mahony, Treas.: 

Atwater, Ladies' Miss. Soc $9 00 

Gari ettsville, Aux. Soc 5 00 

Greenwich, Ladies' Miss. Soc. 4 99 

Kelley'9'Island, Aux. Soc 17 30 

Mansfield, W. B. Soc 3 85 



$'27 00 
4 25 



: 

5 00 



Medina, L. M. Soc $4 25 

Mr. Vernon, Senior Miss'on 

Band of First Ch 15 oo 

Olmsted. W. II. M. Soc 5 00 

Salem, Mrs. 1). A.Allen 5 00 

Sprtojrfleld, W. H. M.soc 20 00 

Girl's class, $.">; Boy's class, 

$1 ; Infant class, $3 9 00 

$98 39 

Berea, First, by C. W. Sanborn 14 45 

Chardon, A. C. Waters 5 00 

Cincinnati, Walnut Hills, Cong. Ch., 

add'i, by C. H. Stevens 10 CO 

Central Ch., add'l, Rev. Josiah strong 50 00 

Claridon, a Friend, for the Debt 2 00 

Cleveland, The Young Ladies of the 
Franklin Avenue Cn., ,l The King's 

Daughters." by Miss M. Kidder 10 00 

Collinwood, by Rev. C. L. Hamlen 12 uo 

Columbus, First, by F. C. Sessions 177 90 

coolville, by Rev. R. W. Graham 9 00 

Cornerville, $7.50; Moss Run, $2.00, by 

Rev. R. G. Beynon 10 10 

Cuyahoga Falls, First Ccng. Sunday- 
school, for Sunday-schDol work, by 

J. W. V. Burt 3 68 

Dover, by Rev. L. J. Aldrich 23 00 

Findlay, Ch., $63.91; Sunday-school, 

$2.50, by Rev. J. P. Riedinger 66 41 

Garrettsville, by H. N. Meiwin 12 25 

Harmar, Ch., of which for Debt, $10, by 

D. Putnam 135 45 

Y.P.S.C.E., for the Debt, by K. W. 

Knapp 10 00 

Sunday-school, $15.74 ; Children's 
Mission Band, $4.26, for Bohemian 

work, by Rev. H. C. Haskell 20 00 

Hudson, W. C. Webster, to const. Ellen 
M. and Mary E. Webster L. Ms., of 

which $50 for the Debt 100 00 

Lodi, A Friend, by Mrs. E. R. Whipple 5 00 
Lorain, Ch.. $35.05; Sunday-school, tor 

the Debt, $10, by Rev. A. D. Barber. . 45 05 
Mansfield, by E. B. Caldwell, for Chil- 
dren's Bohemian fund 10 00 

Tracy and Avery, to con3t. Rev. Sid- 
ney Strong a L. M iOO 00 

Marietta, Y.P.S.C.E. of the First Ch., 

for the Debt, by C. L. Mills 8 00 

Mineral Ridge, by T. G. Jones 30 00 

Mt. Vernon, First Ch., Y.P.S.C.E., 

for the Debt, by F. N.Sprndler 100 00 

Newark, by Rev. E.I. Jones 5 00 

North Kingsville, Mrs. F. W. Comings 5 tO 
North Monroe ville, First, by R.B.Fors- 

ter 9 07 

Norwalk, Ch., for Debt, by W. Belaut. 10 to 

Oberlin, W. H. Mead, for Debt 15 00 

Oxford, Mrs. O. B. Hutchins 5 00 

Perrysburgh, J. K.Deanng 1 25 

Radnor, W. Cong. Sunday-school, for 

the Debt by J.rowell 4 40 

Ravenna. An Ohio Friend, for Debt... 5 uo 
Rock Creek, by Rev. S.R.Rcseboro — 7 50 
Rootstown, Y.P.S.C.E., for the Debt, 

by E. P. Russell 2 28 

Sandusky, First, by H.H.Weat l 25 

Saybrook, " F " 3 00 

Seville, T.B.Doud, for Debt 5 00 

Springfield, First, Y. P. 8. C. E., for the 

Debt, by E. A. Fay 77 00 

Ch., $25 ; Young Ladies' Miss. Soc, 
$10; Y. P. S. C. E., $10; A. D. 
Beecher's S. S. class, $10 ; M. Hend- 
ley's S. S. class, $5.50 ; S. E. Fay's 
S. S. class, $5 ; Miss Berry 's S. S. 
class, $3.85 ; Miss J. Fay's S.S. class, 
$1.70 ; Mrs. S. E. Fay's S. S. class, 
$2.50; Miss Hattie J. Mellen's S.S. 
class, $4.28; Miss Lucie Fay's S.3. 
class, $1 ; Infant class, for Bohemi- 
an work, $1.60, by Rev. W. H. War- 
ren, in full, to const. Mrs. Lucy J. 

Wrigt t and W. J. Fay L. Ms 80 4S 

Steubenville, First, by Mary C. Trainer. 6 03 
Y. I". S. C. E., for the Debt, by A. J. 
Simpson 



32 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



May, 



Sugar Creek, by Rev. J. T. Griffith 

Tallmadge, Clemence C. Wright, for 

Debt .... ... 

Toledo, E. Allen, for Debt 

ToDtogany, J. Whitehead 

Wellington, Ch. and Y. P. S. C. E., $2» ; 

Huotington, $10, for Debt, by T. F. 

Rodhouse 

INDIANA— $28.70. 
Angola and Fremont, by Rev. H. B. 

Knight 

Indianapolis, Mayflower Cong. Ch., by 

Rev. N. A. Hyde, D.D 

ILLINOIS— $449.11. 

Illinois Home Missionary Soc *$ 

Alton, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, by 

Mary A. O. Haven 

Amboy, Mrs. L. B. Mead, for Debt. 
Batavia, Young People's Miss. Soc. of 

Cong. Ch., by Lucy Rowe 

Y. P. M. S., for the Debt, add'l, by 

Lucy Rowe 

Beardstown, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, 

by L. N. Flickner 

Bone Gap, O. S. Rice, for Debt 

Byron, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, by 

Rev. s. A. Harris 

Chicago, Y. P. S. C. E. of Union Park 

Ch., for the Debt, by A. L. Fanning.. 

W. W. Baird, for the Debt 

Danvers, First Ch., H . Ross 

Emingtoo, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, 

by E. Gilbert 

Galesburg. First Ch., for the Debt, by 

J. T. McKnight 

Geneseo, Ladies' Miss. Soc, for Debt, 

by Mrs. A. H. Manington 

Ladies' Mission Circle, by Mrs. N. B. 

Huntington 

<;ieneoe, A. H. Day, for Debt 

Kankakee, Mrs. M. F. Bradley 

Morrison, Robert Wallace, $50; Rev. E. 

G. Smith, $10, to const, a L. M 

Polo, B. H. and H, D. Barber and 

Friends 

Port Byron, Ch., $4.10; Ladies' Soc, 

$12, by W. 8. Grove 

Western Springs, Miss Lillie Stephen- 
sou, for Debt 

Quincy , Joshua Perry 

Ridge Prairie, Rev. A. Kern 

Rockford, Thos. D. Robertson, for the 

Debt 

An Aged Widow, for Debt 

VVheaton, Y. P. S. C. E.,for the Debt, 

byN. Hale 

Woodburn, Ch.,$4.06; Sunday-school, 

$ln, by E. R. Welch 

MISSOURI -$1 ,501.28. 
Woman's H. M. Soc. of Mo., by Mrs. H. 

A. Brown : 

Kansas Citv, Olivet Ch $5 00 

St. Louis, Tnird Ch 1 00 

Amity, for the Debt, by Rev. J. P. 
Field 

Anson and Athens, by Rev. A. W. Wig- 
gins 

Bieckenridge, for Debt, by Rev. D. C. 
Mclatosh 

Bonne Terre, by Rev. F. B. Doe 

Dodge, by Rev. R. J. Mathews 

Foristell, by Rev. E. H. Byrons 

Ioeria, by Rev . A. Douglas 

Kansas City, The Clyde Y. P. S. C. E., 
for the Debt, by Re v . A . L. Cross 

Kidder, by Rev. J. M. Bowers 

La Grange, by Rev. J. Reuth 

North Springfield, Rev. H. C. Brown.. 

North Springheld and Nichols, by Rev. 
H.J. Zercher 

Pierce City, First Cong. Sunday-school, 
by L. L. L. Allen. 



$4 25 

3 00 

5 00 
5 00 



$7 25 
2! 45 



21 25 
5 00 



15 00 
5 00 



2 10 
10 0U 



80 00 

10 00 

2 00 

1 60 

25 00 

27 0C 

5 00 

10 00 

5 00 

60 00 

50 00 

16 10 

2 00 
10 00 

5 00 

50 00 
12 00 

2 00 

14 06 



Special, by Rev. G. S. Kicker 

St. Louis, Pilgrim Ch., by G. L. Day. 
Hyde Park Ch., by T. H. Whitehill. 



5 00 

11 00 
23 60 
2 10 

7 00 
25 

61 00 

13 00 

5 00 

25 00 

8 42 

5 00 
5 00 

530 96 
30 70 



By Rev. S. L. Smith $10 00 

Woman's II. M. Soc. of Pilgrim Ch., 
for Woman's Dept., by J. F. OH- 
phatit 213 00 

Aubert Place. Cong. Mission Y. P. S. 
C. E., by M. Mitchell 5 00 

Friends in Pilgrim Ch., by G. L. Day 529 25 

MICHIGAN— $4,547.95. 
Received by Rev. L. Warren : 

Alamo, J. Hackley $20 CO 

Almont, add'l 5 00 

Ashley 3 16 

Augusta 8 00 

Bay City 12 41 

Sunday-school 20 31 

Bedford 8 00 

Children's Miss. Soc 162 

W. M. S 5 38 

Carmel 2 oo 

Carson City 7 94 

Ceresco 2 30 

Charlotte 50 00 ■ 

Cleon and Marilla 2 11 

covert, Ch 13 00 

Y. P. S. C. E 3 65 

East Tawas 1 53 

Galesburgh 20 68 

A Friend loo 00 

Goodrich, Mrs. J. W. Campbell 5 00 

Grand Blanc, Rev. F. Hurd 10 00 

Hartland 8 82 

Hubbardston S 33 

Lamont 4 00 

Lansing, Weekly offering 81 00 

Leslie, add'l 175 

Lowell 16 00 

Ludington 48 77 

Manistee, First 56 31 

Mention 5 00 

Metamora 6 00 

Michigan, "Mr. Aliquis" 100 00 

Middleville 4 71 

Napoleon 7 55 

Newaygo 31 75 

North Ada 9 00 

Olivet, add'l 24 05 

Pincknev 2 00 

Portland 45 60 

Port Sanilac, Sunday-school... 7 oo 

Rasinville 5 00 

St. Johns, Rev. S. Sessions 2 'o 

Sandstone •. 34 00 

Saranac, add'l 50 

Sault de Ste Marie 5 oo 

Sherman 1 50 

Somerset 7 06 

Tyrone 9 61 

Webster 5 00 

West Adrian 14 00 

White Cloud 8 80 

$862 20 

Received by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, 
Treas. Woman's H. M. Soc: 

Allegan $5 00 

Allendale, by Mrs. H. C. Fin- 

ster 5 00 

Almont. by Mrs. A. Durham.. 5 00 
ADn Arbor, by Mrs. W. V. Tor- 

rans 14 07 

Bangor 14 00 

Benton Harbor 8 35 

Calumet, by Mrs. I. M. Rhodes 113 08 

Ceresco, L.M. S 5 00 

Cheboygan, W. H. M.S., avails 

of a Silk Quilt 47 00 

Clinton 10 67 

Coloma 5 00 

Cooper, Ladies' Pledge card 

offerings 2 50 

Covert, W. H. M. S., $10 ; Mite 

Boxes of the Ladies, $1 .29. . . 25 60 
Detroit, Trumbull Avenue L.M. 

S.. Mite Boxes 19 13 

W. H. M. S., Woodward Av- 
enue Ch., by Mrs. M. L. 
Burt 75 00 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



33 









Douglas, by Mrs. Julia H. 

Plummer $5 oo 

Dowagiac, W. H. M. S., $8; 

Mite Boxes, $22 30 00 

Flint, by Mrs. S. B. Holman... 20 00 
Gaiesburg, by Mrs. A. K. Un- 
derwood 10 oo 

Goodrich, Mrs. Sarah M. Camp- 
bell 5 00 

Grand Blanc W. M. S 10 oo 

Grand Kapids, Primary Sun- 

dav-schojl class, Park Ch — 15 62 
Greenville, by Mrs. C. C. Ells- 
worth 13 54 

W. 11. M. 8. and Mite Boxes 17 21 

Bubbardston 6 50 

Hudson, Mite Boxes 13 17 

Jackson, Dorcas Soc 43 04 

Laiugsburg, by Mrs. May B. 

Anderson....' 16 00 

Litchtleld, Young People's 

Miss. Soc 38 25 

Lowell, by Mrs. W. B. Kichert 15 00 

Lowell 8 00 

Newaygo, W. H. M. S., $5 ; Y. 

I,. M. B.,$5 10 00 

North Ada, Ladies of the On... 3 50 

North Adams 15 00 

Nunica. Ladies of the Ch 81 

Owasso. Y. L. M. B., $8.55; 

Mite Boxes, $16.72 23 27 

Pentwater, Ladies and chil- 
dren 2 00 

Portland, Young Ladies Fanny 

Wadsworth Miss. Soc 5 00 

Romeo, Mite Boxes '. 9 49 

St. Johns, W. M. S 2 25 

Saugatui-k, Ladies 6 70 

Shelbv, Ladies' Aid Soc -3 00 

South Haven, VV. M. S 5 07 

Union City, by Mrs. J. A. Bar- 
ton 10 00 

Vernon, L. M. S., and Mite 

Boxes 26 35 

Wacmsta, W. H. M. S 8 00 

Watervliet 4 38 

West Adrian, VV. M. s 10 oo 

From other sources : 

Bsnton Harbor, Ch. special coll. 

fortueDebt 7 15 

Rev. W.H. Brewster 5 00 

Calumet, Ladies of the Ch., 

special 13S 92 

Chelsea, Happy Messenger 
Mission Band, by Flora Hep- 

per 5 00 

Detroit, Sunbeam Band and 

Opportunity Club 10 00 

Ladies' Union, First Ch., by 

Mrs. E. E. Leggett 100 00 

Duplain, Mrs. Eoler 52 

Eaton Rapids, Ladies' Mite Box 

coll 11 50 

Hartford. Mite Box coll., by 

Mrs. J. W. Hubbard 4 24 

Olivet, L. A. Soc, by Mrs. H. 

E. Gun 16 00 

Jewell Class for Cnildren's 
Bohemian fund, by Mrs. H. 

E. Gun 7 60 

Otsego, Mabel Temple 1 00 

Port Huron, Mrs. A. E. Was- 
tell, $1; Mrs. M. A. Kelsey, 
$1 ; Mrs. Eliza Gillett, $1 . . . . 3 00 
Saginaw Confetence, by Mrs. B. 
B. Buckhout. 

Alma $5 00 

Alpena 23 oo 

Bay City 8 54 

Bridgeport 5 84 

East Saginaw, W. H.M. S 31 64 

Y. L. M. S 4 81 

Essexville 3 50 

Munger 1 13 

Tawas 3 79 

Wacousta, Mrs. Oscar Harts.. 



Mite Box $5 oo 

92 25$ 1,169 73 
Ann Arbor, Y. P. 8. C. E., for the Debt, 

by R. C. Scott 40 00 

J. A. Scott for the Debt and in full, to 
const. Rev. W. II. Ryder, Mrs. A.T. 
Ryder, Fred Ryder, Mary Ryder, 
Minnie Ryder, Arthur Ryder, Robt. 
Ryder, C. T. Ryder, M. E. Morton, 
B. W. Scott and S. P. Scott L. Ms. . 300 00 

Augusta, by Rev. J. D. Shults 12 25 

Banks, $7.05 ; Eastport, $4.13, by Rev. 

P. F. McClelland ills 

Bay Mills, $3.95; Superior, $5.55, by 

Rev. I. B. Lillie 9 50 

Bay Mills and Superior, by Rev. I. B. 

Lillie l 79 

Bellaire. by Rev. II. A. Kerns 3 82 

Berryville and Vanderbilt, by Rev. J.J. 

Kanagy 13 12 

Bradley, $10 ; Waylaud, $10, by Rev. I. 

B.Jones 2000 

Bridgeport, by Rev. A. J. VauCamp. . . 10 00 

Bridgman, by Rev. J.J.Bunnell 5 00 

Calumet, by E. T. Curtis 247 95 

Chase, by Rev. J. Nicol 8 00 

Chester, by Rev. A. Van Auken 5 00 

Coral, by Rev.L.P.Spelman 13 70 

Croton, by Rev. G. Lloyd 8 31 

Detroit, First, add'l, by G.M.Lane 50 00 

Second, by W. F.Baker, to const. H. 
A. Raymond, Mabel F. Baker, Min- 
nie Pigott aud Fannie E. Peacock, 

L.Ms 322 55 

"Shining Lights Soc." Tmmbull 
Avenue Cong. Sunday-school, by 

M. L. Williams 20 00 

A Friend, for Debt 5 00 

Eastlake, by Rev.H. C. Hurlbut 10 00 

East Siginaw, First, by E. W. Glynu.. 159 22 

t'reeport,by Rev.D. L. Eaton 16 00 

Gaylord, by Rev. W. H. Millar 20 00 

Genesee, by Rev. F.C. Wood 3 26 

Grand Kapids. Ch. $14.78, Y. P. S. C. E., 
$6.55, forthe Debt, by H. H. Pollard. . 21 33 
So. Cb. Add'l, by Rev. B.F. Sargent. 2 00 
Hancock, by Rev. G. F. Waters, in full, 
to const. E. L. Wright, G. S. Beutley 

and C. A. Stringer L. Ms 120 64 

Hariford, by Rev. S. Taylor 5 00 

Hopkins, A Friend 1 00 

Imlay, by Rev. R. Stapleton 26 50 

Ithaca, by Rev. N. D. Glidden 10 48 

Kalamazoo, First, a Life Member, by J. 

O. Seeley 10 00 

Kalkaska, $8 ; Ex elsior, $1.50, by Rev. 

W. Sidebotham 9 50 

Laingsburg, First, by W. J. Tillotson. . 18 58 

Mendon, by Rev. L. H. Keller 5 03 

Michigan, A Friend, by W. W. Wines.. 60 00 

Onondaga, by Rev. P. M. Cripps 50 CO 

Ovid, by Rev. E. Hill 21 55 

Perry, by Rev. F. W. Bush 18 25 

Pierport and Pleasanton, by Rev. C. 

S. Delvin is 57 

Potterville, Chester and Chester Sta- 
tion, by Rev. A. Van Auken 12 71 

Romeo, Miss Mary A. Dickinson, of 

which $n0 for Debt . 100 00 

W. Loud 30 00 

Roscommon, by Rev. G. C. Dalgliesch.. 3 00 
Rosedale, $S.05; Stella Kemp, $3, by 

Rev. J. W.Holt 11 05 

St. Clair, Mrs. M. A. Hopkins, of Cong. 
Ch., for Debt, by Rev. W. O. Millard. 100 00 

St. Ignace, by Rev. C . E. Taggart 6 39 

St. Joseph, Ch., $212; Sunday-school, 
$15 ; Birthdays, for Debt, $4, by Rev. 

J. V. Hickmott 23100 

St. John, First, by J. C. Barrett 53 76 

Salem, by M. B. Gelston 30 00 

Sault Ste. Mane, by Rev. J. C. Van 

Auken 10 00 

Shelby, bv Rev. T. Parker 7 15 

Wayne. First, by W. C. Steers 19 00 

West Windsor, by Rev. C. F.Van Auken 96 71 



34 



rHE HOME MISSIONARY. 



May, 



Wheatland, Coag., $36.12; Sunday- 

s:hool, $1'»; Ladles' Soc, $7.30; Mile 

Boxes, $6.5.-), by C. M. Fuller $60 00 

White Cloud, by Rev. H. H. Smith 31 20 

WISCONSIN— $355.23. 
Wisconsiu Home Missionary Society. *$lo,893 92 
Ashland, Rev. G. A. Hood aud wife, 

f'>r the Debt, and to const. Cora C. 

HoodaL.M . 50 00 

By Rev. U. A. Hood 24 62 

Beloit, Woman's H. M. Union of Wis., 

for Debt, $5; Woman's Miss. Soc. of 

First Ch., by Mrs. C. C. Keeler, $7.. 12 00 
Boscobel. Y. P. S. C. E., for Debt, by 

Mrs. A.A.Young 2 00 

Burlington, Clara Kantsby, for Debt. .. 5 00 
Clintonville, Y. P. S. C. E. of Cong. 

Ch., for Debt, by Miss Anna Metzaer 5 50 
Elroy, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, by 

E. Towne Ill 

Geneva Lake, Milo Burnard, for Debt.. 10 On 

La Crosse, G. H . Ray, for Debt 25 00 

Madison, J. W. Blakeslee 5 00 

Menomome. Cong. Sunday-school, $5; 

Mrs. D. W. Gillmor, $2, for Debt T 00 

John H. Knapp, for Debt 200 00 

Monroe, Miss F. A. Locke, for Debt 5 00 

Windsor, Mrs. E. Butltr, for Debt 3 00 

IOWA— $175.15. 

Iowa Home Missionary Society $11,953 36 

Bellevue, Ladies of Ch., for the Debt, 

by Mrs. M. J. Nichoson 2 00 

Blairstown, A Friend 100 00 

Buffalo Grove aud Wesley, by Rev. L. 

C. Johnson 2 15 

Davenport, Rev. J. A. Reed 10 00 

Holland, A Friend 5 00 

La Motte, Mrs. A. S. McDole 10 On 

Mount Pleasant, Cong. Sunday-school, 

for Children's Bohemian Fund, by 

Rev. E. P. Smith 6 60 

Newton, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, by 

Rev. S. F. Dickinson 10 00 

Oskaloosa, C. H. Edns, for the Debt. . . 5 00 
Tabor, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, by 

Miss L. E. Jones 15 00 

Tipton, virs. M. D. Clapp, for Debt, by 

Mrs. J. M. L. Daniels 9 40 

MINNESOTA— $1,336.55; of which Leg- 
acy, $200. 
Received by Rev. J. H. Morley : 

Miuueap >li*, Plymouth Ch., by 

H.B. fludsoa $4103 

Mrs. Taintor 10 00 

Morris, A Friend 10 00 

Rochester, by E. E. Gooding.. 34 22 

St. Paul, Plymouth Ch., Mrs. 
Bailey, $2.50; Mrs. Mayo, $2.50 5 00 

Winona, W. H. M. Soc, special 65 00 

$155 25 
Received by Mrs. J. N. Cross, 
Treas. Minn. Woman's H. M. 
Soc, in Feb.: 

Alexandria, L. M. S $30 00 

Edina Mills, S. S 5 00 

Huntley 10 00 

Minneapolis, Mayfljwer W. 

M S 2 35 

Second ,' \V." M .' S .' .' .' .' .' .' .' .' .' .'..'. 16 82 

Plymouth, W. H. M. S 31 (.0 

Y. L. M. S 16 50 

Mrs. Joanna Woods, for Debt 10 00 

Sauk Center, S. S 30 19 

St, Paul, Ailantic W. M. S 10 00 

Worttiington, W. M. S 5 00 

$166 86 
Received by Mr?. J. N. Cross, 
Treas. Minn. Woman's H. M. 
So<\, in March: 
Faribault, Officers and Teachers 

of Miss. School, for the Debt. $8 50 
Little Falls, VV. M. S., special.. 6 00 
Minneapolis, First Ch., W. H. 
M. S 40 00 



Second Ch., Drippings from a 

Siloam wedding $21 23 

Pilgrim Ch. Mission Band 5 00 

Plymouth, Y. L. M. S 6 50 

W. H. M. S., of which, $95 ; 

for Debt 129 00 

Vine Ch., W. M. S 5 00 

Union H. M. Meeting, special 

coll 9 40 

Owatonna, W. M. S 12 50 

St. Anthony Park, W. M. S 5 00 

St. Cloud, W. M. S., special. ... 18 00 
St. Paul, Atlantic Y. L. M. S... 5 00 
Viliard, W. Al. S 1 60 

$272 63 $594 74 

Anoka, by Rev. A. G. Nelson 3 00 

Benson, by Rev. C. A. Ruddock 1 63 

Brainerd, by Rev. J. A. Rowell, for 

Debt lo 00 

Clearwater, Ch.,$6.98; Y. P. S. C. E., 
for the Debt, $2.30, by Rev. G. W. 

Sargent 9 2S 

Detroit, by Rev. D. W. Morgan 16 00 

Duluth, Ladies' Miss. Soc of the Pil- 
grim Ch., for the Debt, by Emma H. 

Drew 33 50 

Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, by H. L. 

Olmsted 22 20 

Faribault Y. P. S. C. £., for the Debt, 

by S. g\ Sauford 41 00 

High Forest and Stewartsville, by Rev. 

H. J. Colwell 6 83- 

Lyle, by Rev. J. H. Morley 3 75 

Minneapolis, Legacy of Mrs L. H. Por- 
ter, by Rev. S. F. Porter, Ex 200 00 

Plymouth Ch., J. E. Bell, forth eDebt 100 00 

By Rev. K. F. Norris 4 25 

•' In Memonam," for tne Debt 10 00 

T. H. Williams 10 co 

E. S. Jones 100 00 

Red Wing, A Friend, for Debt 5 00 

Rochester, Adct'l, by Rev. J. F. Taintor 2 00 

St. Cloud, First, t v W. T. Clark 12 UO 

St. Paul, Atlantic Ch., by C. C. Hussey 9 40 

Plymouth Ch., by W. Burrows 80 «0 

Plymouth, by W. Burrows 30 CO 

The Little Pilgrim Miss. Soc for 

Debt, by Rev. G. P. Dickinson 3 00 

Sauk Rapids, Y. P. 8. C. E., for the 

Debt, by Rev. P. S. Smith 4 12 

Sleepy Eve, by Rev. S. M. McNeill 3 65- 

Tjler, Ladies' Aid Soc, for Debt, by 

Mrs. Emily A. Lechlar 3 00 

Wabasha, Ch , $11.10; Cong. Sunday- 
school, $11.13, by G. P. DeLons 22 23 

Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, by. C. 

H . Johnson 10 47 

Waterville, $8 ; New Richland, $6, by 

Rev. J. Hay ward 14 00 

Add'lfor Debt, by A. P. Merrill.... 3 50 
Winona, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, 

by Nettie Stevens 18 00 

KANSAS-$802.17. 
Received by Rev. J. G. Dougherty, 
Treas. Kan. H. M. Soc: 

Hiawatha, for the Debt.. $2 50 

Ottawa 100 00 

Paola, forthe Debt 22 75 

125 25 

Altoora and Village Creek, by Rev. T. 

V. Davies 16 00 

Bala, by Rev. J. Howell 14 00 

Chapman aud Sutphens' Mills, by Rev. 

G. H. Perry 15 86 

Clay Center and Mt. Vernon, by Rev. 

L. C. Schnacke "'10 

Douglass, by Re v . G . Marsh 4 50 

Downs, by Rev. T. Marsh 4 00 

Ford, by Rev. J. E. Courier 5 00 

Junction Citv, by Rev. M.S. Riddie... 12 00 

Kirwin, by Re v . L. A . Smith 2 00 

Lawrence, Plymouth Ch ., to const . Rev. 
R. Cordley aL. M.,$110; Y. P. S. C. 
E., for the Debt, $10.50, by C. L. Ed- 
wards 120 50 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY 



35 



Longtou ana Elk Falls, by Rev. II. H. 

Gilchrist 

Mannattan, by J. w. Blain 

Milford, bv Rev. R. B. Foster 

Paola, x. P. S. C. K., addl, fur the 

Debt, by N. Bray man 

Y. P. 8. C. E., for Debt, by llettie 

Braymaii 

Pomona, Kev. L. Newcomb 

Reno Center, by Rev. L. H. Plait 

Bevery, by Kev. J. Cooper 

Topeka, First, by T. A. Mason, to 
const. T. E. Bowman, S. J. Carr- 
lidge, P. Flatter, A. D. Gray, Mrs. 
Fanny J. Storrs ami Mrs. Mauie H. 

Sue L. Ms 

Y. P. S. U. E., $>0, to const. Mi~s M. 
s. siH-rrili a L. M.; Eelping Hands, 
$20, of First ch., for tbe Debt, by E. 

G. Smith 

Students of Washburn College, by R. 

U. Harper 

Tonganoiie anil Kanwaka, by Kev. A. 

M. Rlcbardsoo 

NEBRASKA— $861.29. 
Received bv Rev. J. L. Maile: 
Bv Mrs. If. D. Perry: 

Arborville $ 5 oo 

Crete 5 00 

Syracuse 10 00 

Waco 2 51 

Weening Water 5 00 

('larks, by Kev. G. W. Brown- 

john 6 00 

Cowles,by Rev. W. D. Page.. 10 00 
Fremont, by Rev. Loren F. 

Berry 222 Ou 

Hastings, by Mrs. W. Walters, 

Juvenile Lamplighters 10 0:) 

Omaha, First, by J. E. Wilbar..l00 00 

Arlington and Fontanelle, $17.20 ; Dona- 
tion, $5, by Rev. W. P. Clancv 

Ashland, Qr. coll., $11.50; for the Debt, 

$5. 50, by Rev. W. Leavut 

Beatrice, by Rev. E. If. Asnmun 

Bartlett, by Rev. J. A. Hulett 

Creighton, T. Kent 

Crete, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, by 

A. M. Eyster 

Friend, by Rev. 8. String 

Glencoe, Rev. W. D. J. Stevenson 

Gioversville, by Rev. James Billing 

Grafton, by Rev. J. B. Doolittle 

Hasting-, A Friend 

Huuting:on and Trumbull, by Rev. J". 

Herbert 

Lakeside, by Rev. J. P. Sparrow 

Minden, H. W. Sprague 

Ravenna, by Kev. R. M. Travers 

Rising City and Ulysses, by Rev. J. T. 

Otis 

Silver Creek, by Rev. J. Roberts 

South Bend and Mainland, by Rev. S. 

C. Dean 

Waco, by Rev. A. B. Snow 

Waverlv, by Rev. G. S. Blscoe 

NORTH DAKOTA— $113.25. 
Fargo, Plymouth Mission Ban^l, by 

Rev. W. Ewing 

Glen Ullin, by Kev. (.'. A. Mack 

Grand Forks, by Rev. A. L. Gillett 

Jamestown, by Rev. D. Wirt 

Michigan City, $10; Edmunds, $2, by 

Rev. H. C. Simmons 

• Watt pet m, by Rev. G. B. Barnes 

SOUTH DAKOTA— 5176.30. 
Alexandria and Emery, by Rey. A. T. 

Lyman 

Arena and Logan, by Rev. M. E. Bacon 
Chamberlain, by Rev. W. B. Hubbard. 

Custer City, by Rev. H. Bross 

Dover, by Rev . J. H. Gurnev 

Howard and Wmfre f ', by Rev. I. G. 

Gordan 

Lake Henry and Huitland, by Rev. F. 

G. Appleton 



$7 75 
i9 55 
5 0J 


78 


11 72 
2 00 

14 40 
2 111 


325 31 


70 00 


3 00 


6 35 



375 51 



17 00 


71 50 


5 U0 


7 50 


6 41 


2 00 


10 00 


3 90 


18 44 


50 CO 


3 93 


5 00 


5 00 


2 10 


21 75 


5 31 


5 00 


9 79 


13 95 


6 00 


1 50 


59 09 


16 20 


12 00 


18 46 


13 50 


7 60 


15 00 


4 25 


2 25 



Lear*. City, by Rev . G. Belsey 

Letcher, by Rev. J. \V. Russell 

Rapid City, by Rev. J. \V. Davis 

licr lli'igfits, by Rev. G. J. Hattey 

Revillo and Wilson, by Rev. 11. Gra- 
ham 

Ttmpleton, by Rev. S. F. Iluntly 

Tulare and Rediield, by Rev. L. J. C. 
Gelck ". 

Valley Springs, {4.:iC>; Children's Mis- 
sion Band, $5, by Rev. VV. H. Watson 

W.ikonda, by Rev. C. D. Gearhart 

Watertown, by Rev. R. H. Bittey 

COLORADO— $255.79. 

Colorado Springs, by lion. J. P.. Severy 

Crested Butte, Ladies Miss. Soc, by 
Mis. V. F. Axtel 

Denver, First, by H. P. Steele 

Eva Miller, for Debt 

Oiis, bv Rev. G. Dungan 

West Deuver, Ch., 5*3.25; Ladies Miss. 
Soc., $20; Sunday-school, $7.60; Y.P. 
S. C. E.,for the Debt, $4.15, by Rtv. 

R. T. cross 

MONTANA— $27.50. 

Butte City, by J. B. Clark 

Livingston, by Rev. W. C. Fowler 

UTAH— $15.10. 

Ogden, by Rev. A. J.Bailey 

CALIFORNIA— $732.50. 

Received by J. S. Hutchinson, 
Fin. Agent : 

■Jenicia, by S. H. Wil'.ey $7 25 

Los Ang-les, First, in part 340 eO 

Merced Falls, Mrs. A. C. Nel- 
son 2 50 

Oakland, First Cn., Y. P. S. C. 

fi, for the Debt 53 15 

Plymouth Avenue 58 25 



$10 50 
1 00 
12 50 

4 37 

20 00 

5 00 



9 36 
6 80 
11 41 

94 29 

4 50 

73 00 

5 00 
4 CO 



75 00 



17 50 
i0 00 



Alturss, bvRev. G. Griffiths 

Auburn, by Rev. C. L. Corwin 

Belmont, Mrs E. L. Reed, Mrs. F. A. 

Blackburn, Miss Harriet Reed, Willie 

Reed, for tn e Debt 

Cedarvilie and Bidwell, by Rev. D. F. 

Taylor 

Clayton, $6.S5 ; Pactteco, $1.35, by Rev. 

J. H. Strong 

Cloverdale, by Rev. M. L. Jones 

Lincoln, by Rev. L. N. Barber 

Los Angeles, Park Cu., by Rev. E. R. 

Brainerd 

Rev. C. D. Chanin and wife 

National Citv, by Rev. E. D. Weage 

Ontario, by Rev. W. H. Wolcott 

San Bernardino, First, by Rev. E. C. 

Oakley 

San Ju«n, by Rev. A. B. Palmer 

Santa Barbara, Y. P. S. C. E., for the 

Debt 

Sierre Madre, by Rev. J. T. Ford 

OREGON— $178.45. 
Received by James Steele, Treas. 

Or. and Wash. Ter. H. AI. Soc: 

Forest Grove, First $32 00 

Portland, First Oh., to const. 
Rev. T. E. Clapp a L. M 51 50 

The Dalles, First 10 00 



461 15 

7 50 

12 55 



16 20 



8 20 

20 00 

5 00 

16 10 

25 CO 

26 30 
25 0O 

50 00 
12 50 

8 50 
31 50 



Astoria, by Rev. G. H. Atkinson, D.D.. 

Beaver Creek, Rev. H. R. Jones 

Corvallis, by Rev. G. H. Lee 

Oregon City, Ch.,$20.S0; Y. P. S. C. E., 

$25, by Rev. G. A. Rockwood 

Portland, Y. P. S. C. E., of the First 

Ch., for the Debt, by T. H. Fleming. . 
Portland Heights and Beaverton, by 

Rev. L. Kelsey 

WASHINGTON TERRITOKY— $34.50. 
Ferndale and Semiahmco, by Rev. G. 

Baker 

Houghton, Y. p . S. C. E., for the Deo'. 

by Rev. S. Greene 



93 50 

8 00 
6 00 
6 35 


45 80 


15 SO 


3 00 


3 CO 


2 oO 



36 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



May 



Pullman and Union Flat, by Rev. J. 

Davies 

Skokomish, Rev. M. Eells.by Jas. Steele, 

Treas. Or. and Wash. Ter. H. M. S.. 
Spokane Falls, by Rev. J. Edwards. 



, Tremont, N. Y., Ladies' Soo. of Trinity 
$2 50 Co., by Mrs. Mary E. Clark, barrel anil 

i freiget $73 03 

4 00 Wallingford, Ct., Ladies' Benev. Soc, by 

2 00 Miss Jennie E Doolittle, barrel 12118 



Taconii, by Rev. S. H. Cheadle 20 50 ! Webster, Groves, Mo., W. H. M. Soc, 



Olympia, by Rev. J. Campbell, 31 00 
[Erroneously acknowledged in February.] 
JAPAN— $500.00. 
Okayama, Miss Eliza Talcott, by M. 

Talcott 500 00 

SANDWICH ISLANDS— $15.00. 
Honolulu, Mrs. Lyoia B. Coan, by Rev. 
F.A.Noble. 15 00 [ Receipts of the Main" 



00 



barrel. 
Wells River, Vt., Mrs. E, J. Ranslow, 

two barrels and freigot 63 13 

Worcester, Mass., Ladies' Benev. Soc. of 

Union Ch., by Mrs. E. H. Vaill, five 

barr Is and carpet 703 00 



Home Missionary 325 88 

Expended during the year by the aux- 
iliaries named 

Received at this office in March, 1SS7.. 70,158 49 

Donations of Clothing, etc. 

Bridgeport, Ct., Ladies' Home Miss. Soc. 

Qf First Co., tarough W. H. M. U. Ct., 

by Mrs. C. R. Palmer, box and freight. $2tC 50 

Bristol, R. L, Ladies' Miss. Soc. of First 

Ch., oy Annie W. Fitoti, barrel and 

freight 57 00 

Brooklyn, N. Y., Ladies' Soc, by Mrs. 

J as. H. Goidey. two barrels Ill 63 

Rev. S. B. Halliday, bundle 

Greenville. Micti., by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, 

Treas. W. H. M. Soc , of Mich 

Benton Harbor, three banels and pack- 
age 116 00 

Grand Blanc, Ladies' Aid Soc, pulpit 

Bible 7 50 

Grand Rapids, Park Ch., barrel 24 87 

Grinnell, Iowa, by Mrs. T. O Douglass.. 

Ames, box 30 00 

Cedar Rapids, box 38 57 

Cherokee, box and cash 2 1 00 

Council Bluffs, box So 00 

Denmark, box 10 00 

Dubuque, two boxes 50 00 

Mt. Pleasant, box 44 61 

Wdliamsburg, b >x — 30 00 

Ha Uey, Mass.. Ladies, Home Miss. Soc. 
of First Religious Soc, by Mrs. Edwin 

Smith, nine pairs of socks 7 83 

HammoDdsville, N. Y., Ladies' Home 
Miss. S ;c, by Mr3. J. J. Bond, cloth'.ng 

and cash 20 00 

Hartford, Ct., Ladies' Sew. Soc. of First 
Ch. Aux.to W. C. H. M. U., of Ct., by 



2 00 

15 75 

40 25 

24 00 
5 00 
4 25 



issionary Society from 
Jan. l5«/i, 1887, to March 7th, 1S-J7, John L. 
Ckosby, Treas. 
Augusta, South ch., add'l, by E. A. Na- 

son, Tr $10 00 

Bangor, Central District Sunday-School, 

by Ella T. Rich, which with previous 

donation constitutes R. H. Hunt L. M.. 

Brewer, First Ch. and Soc, by Dea. G. A. 

Snow 

Brunswick, First Ch., by R. H. Stanwood, 

Tr 

Camden, Ch. and Soc, by Dea. E. D. 

Mansfield, which const tutes him a L.M. 

Castine, Ch., by Rev. J. E. Adams, Sec'y. 

Cornish, Ch., by Willis Warren 

Dennysvilte, Ch. and Soc, by Geo. A. 

Peabody, Tr 17 50 

Fort Fairfield, Ch.. by Rev. R. D. Osgood. 23 29 

Gilead, Ch . , by Rev. A. L. Gridley 2 52 

Gortiam, First Ch.,by Rev. H. S. Hunt- 
ington, for North Alison Ch 25 00 

Hallowed, Mrs. Almira C. Dummer, leg- 
acy received from Robert W. Lord and 
Chas. D. Barry, executors, to be called 
the " Mary Cleaves Fund," and the in- 
terest on same alone, to be expended 

for the purposes of the society 8,8(0 CO 

Hampden, by Dea. E. F. Duren 6 07 

Liraiugron, by Rev. J. E. Adams, Seo'y.. . 7 00 

Madison, by Rev. J. E. Adams, Sec'y 26 00 

New Snaron, by Rev. G. W.Jones 

Patten, by Mr. S. H. Woodrow 

Pnillips, by Miss Cornelia T. Crosby 

Portland, Williston Co.. by G. F. Thurs- 
ton, Tr 45 93 

Saccarappa, Second On., Westbrook, by 

H. P. Murch, Tr 36 80 

Vassalboro, Adams Memorial Ch., by Rev, 
if. E. Adams, Sec'y 



5 35 
2 00 
5 00 



Miss Einma Bunce, barrel 112 12 Wells, B. Maxwell, Esq. 

Ladies Soc. of Pearl Street Ch.,by Hat- 
tie E. Cowles, barrel, half-barrel and 

freight.. 166 28 

Middletown, Ct., Ladies' Home Miss. Soc. 

of First Ch., by C. M. Bacon, barrel and 

box 130 00 

New Britain, Ct., Ladies' Benev. Soc. of 

First Ch., by A. C. Strickland, box 

New Haven, Ct., Ladies Soc. of College 

Street Ch. Aux. to W. H. M. U., of Ct., 

by Mrs. L. M. Fowler, box 176 00 

Ladies' Home Miss. Soc. of Dwight 
Pla<*e Ch., by Mrs. C. S. Gray, box 
and freight 129 80 

Ladies' Aid Soc. of United Ch., by Mrs. 
De Forest, box, cash and freight — 162 20 

Ladies' Home Miss. Soc. of the Ch., of 
the Redeemer, by H. A.Miller, box.. 170 00 

Mrs. A. M. Waeeler, box 

New York City. Ladies' Home Miss. Soc. 

of Broadway Tab. Ch., by Mrs. W. D. 

Harper, trunks 4,404 44 

State Charities Aid Assoc, bundle 

Norfolk, Ct., Ladies' Sew. Soc, by Miss 

Anna Battell, box and freight 163 80 

Norwich, Ct., Ladies' Home Miss. Soc. of 

Park CD., by Lydia B. Young, commun- 
ion set 30 00 

St. Louis, Mo., Ladies' Home Miss. Soc. 

of Pilgrim Ch., by Mrs. Clinton Rowell, 

six barrels 524 60 

Traverse City, Mich., Ladies, by Rev. 

Leroy Warren barrel 70 00 



5 52 
20 00 

6 00 



Mrs. Lydia Maxwell, legacy (annual)... 
Wmthrop, Mrs. Narcissa S. Bourne, lega- 
cy (in part) bv Albion P. Snow, adm'r. . 5,000 oo 

Woodtords, by Dea. J. H. Clark 25 00 

Income trom Stocks, etc 567 00 

$14,727 26 

Previously acknowledged 8,045 51 

Total receipts from June 12th, 18S6, to 
date $22,772 77 

Receipts of the Massachusetts Home Missionary So- 
ciety in March, by Rev. Edwin B. Palmer, 
Treas. 

A lady. Debt $15 00 

Amherst, Rev. G. S. Dickerman, Debt 10 00 

North, of which $11.36 from Y. P. for 
bebt, by S. E. Harrington, to const. Mrs. 
Elizabeth C. Oilman, Mrs. Ellen E. Alli- 
son, Miss Henrietta Field, Mr. Fred S. 
Cooley and Mr. William B. Loomis L. 

Ms 15100 

Second, by H. Sabin, Debt 14 00 

Ancio ver, South, by Geo. Gould 125 00 

West, A Member, by Rev. F. W. Greene, 
Debt 5 00 

Arlington, Orthodox, by Robert A. Wall, 

Debt 74 60 

Ladies' Benev. Soc, by R. A. W, Debt. 10 00 
Sunday-school, by R. A. W, Debt 28 09 

Ashland, by Ed win' Perry, Debt 20 00 

Y. P., by Edwin Perry, Debt 5 00 

Ayer, by Levi Wallace 20 35 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



37 



Barre, Woman's H. M. Soc, Debt 

Bermmlston by Henry Slate 

Beverly, Washington St. Y. P., bv A. L. 

Patch. Debt 

Boston, Special, lor Mrs. II. S. C. Books. 

A Men ', •' B." Debt 

Proceeds ot Coin 

A. M. 0.,Oebt 

Anonymous, Special for Books 

«C," Debt 

Carer, Miss U, Debt 

,1. n. 1)., Debt 

Dorchester. A friend. " B," Debt 

Pilgrim, V. P., by E. L. Miller, Debt.... 
Second, by Miss Elizabeth Tolnian, 

Debt 

Y. P. loll., by Miss \V. V. Blanch- 
aid, Debt 

By M iss E . Tolman 

Sunday-school, by Miss E. L; Tol- 
rnan, Debt 

For the Debt, 

M'. Vernon, by Mr. and Mrs. II. M. B., 

Debt 

Old South, by Geo. R. Chapman 

Park St., Y. P.. by E. H. Magutre 

Roxbury, A friend, " H.," Debt 

Iinmanuel, bj Francis J. Ward, Debt 
Y. P. (of which. $•"> from one friend), 

bv ii. T. G. Brown, Debt 

Kli t, by A. MoU-an 

Mrs. Nathan Bobbins, DeDt. 

South Phillips, by E. J. Lincoln, for 

L>ebt 

Union, by Albert Gay. Debt 

By Albert Gay ($1 ot which from Mrs. 

M. W. Wilkinson), Debt 

Whitaev, Miss E. J., Debt 

Boxford, Firft, bv Kev. K. R. Kendall, to 

const. Rev. K. R. K. L. M 

Y. P., by K. R. Kendall. Debt 

Braintree, First, by a. B. Keith 

South, Y. P., by Miss M. 3. Potter, 

Debt 

Brighton, Sunday-school, by M. E. Puring- 

ton. Debi 

Brnntleld, First, by M. H. Coibm (of 
which $14 thank-offering for general 

missy Jones' wotk) 

Two fnetids of Missions, by M. H. 

i oroin, Deot 

Brockton, Campello. by E. B. Estes 

Porter, by Geo. C. Cary. to const Dea. 
Jos. S. Smith, Harrison G. Phillips, 
Mr . Harriet D. Jones, and Miss 

Cornelia Eldy L Ms 

Buckland, by Rev. A. C. Hodges 

Y. P., bv Kev. A. C. Hodges, Debt 

Kimball S. Field, by Rev. A. C. H 

Mrs. J. Q. A. Wiley, by Rev. A. C. II.. 

Cambridge, vi iss B. , Debt 

Norm. A friend, ov Rev. W. 8. Alex- 
ander, D.D., Debt 

Rev. W. A. Mandell and wife, Debt.. 
Cambridgeport, Pilgrim, by N. H. Hol- 

brook '■ . - 

Chelsea, First, C. E. R. Worth, Debt 

Concord, Trim Cong., Special, by Thomas 

Todd, Debt 

Conway. Cong, and Sunday-school, by 
Francis Howland, t j const. Rev. Wm. 

A. Tnomas L. M 

Cummington. West, by Rev. J. R. Flint. 

D-dtiam, Three friends, Debt 

Derry, N. H., A friend, Debt 

Douglas, An aged friend, by Rev. Jaa. 

Wells 

Dover. Birthday offerings from Sunday - 

scno )1, by Geo. Howe. Debt 

Hiveo, Y. P., bv J. W. Hiugins, Debt. 
Egremont. South, Y. P., by Ella C. Gard- 
ner, Deot 

Essex. Ladies' Benev. Circle, by Mary C. 

Osgood, Debt 

Sunday-school, by Mary C.Osgood, Debt 



•21 00 


5 00 


10 00 


35 


5 00 


5 0(1 


2< 0J 


1 (10 


10 00 


:t on 


40 00 


27 00 


4 29 


68 8S 


1 50 


3 0(1 


51 00 


9T3 iiO 


10(1 (0 


5 00 


127 28 


20 00 


m oo 


1 25 


100 00 


24 00 


145 00 


10 00 


52 CO 


2 5C 


25 50 



$5 0t)|Fairhaven, Miss Sarah Pope $5 00 

3 27 Fall River, Central, by R. B. Borden, to 
I const. Dea. Chas. A. Holmes, Dea. ('has. 
A. Baker, Dea. Thomas J. Borden L. 

Ms. of A. II. M. S 350 OS 

Y. P., by A. J. Abbe, to const. Miss 
Maty A. Baker L. M. of A. 11. M. 8., 

Debt 50 09 

Fitchburg, Calv. Cong. Ladies, by E. L. 

Packard, Debt 20 oo 

RollstOLe, by W. E. Clifford, Debt 132 13 

(Y. P., $25.15 and Ladles $5.05) by 

Emma A. Sawyer, Debt 30 20 

Framingham. Saxonville, Edwards, by 

Tristam Goldthwaite, Debt 12 92 

Y r . P., by Tristam Goldthwaite, 

Debi 8 60 

Plymouth, A friend, by F. B. Home, 

Debt -. 5 00 

Y. P., bv F. B. Home, Debt 140 00 

South, Y. P. (in part), Debt 94 00 

Franklin, First, by Chas. Gowen 20 00 

Gardner. First, by Dan'l H. Rand 50 00 

Georgetown. First, by i,. L. Chaplin 56 00 

Greenfield, Second, by Lucy A. Spar- 

Iwwk 61 65 

Groton, Union, bv II. ('. Rockwood or, 50 

Grnveland, by Mary A. Clarke, Debt 15 50 

Hadley, First, by Rodney Smith 10 91 

Y. P., by Mary A. Conk, Debt 4 31 

Hampden, Benev. Assoc, by Chas. 
Marsh, Tr.: 

Agawaui, Debt $25 00 

Feeding Hills 5 00 

Chester, Second 10 00 

Holyoke. Second (of which $86.50 
for Debt), to const. Mrs. Rebecca 
B. Allyn, Mrs. Miriam K. Childs, 
Mrs. Fannie J. Hardy and Mrs. 
Amelia R. Ohapin L. Ms. of A. 

H. M. S 29S 22 

Ludlow 26 90 

Ladies 15 00 

Sunday-school 167 

Palmer, First 17 32 

South Hartley Falls 34 38 

Springfield, Memorial 340 00 

Ira A. Merrill, Thank-offering 

for recovery from illness 5 00 

North 47 14 

W est. Park St 72 70 

Y. P., Debt 100 00 

Westfleld, First 6 15 

Second 59 35 

1,063 83 

Hanson, by Isaac C. Howlaud 14 13 

Hardwick, Calvinistic, by Rev. C. M. 

Pierce 8 00 

Haverhill, West, by Walter F. Poore, 

Debt 17 50 

Hawley, Rev. H. Seymour 2 00 

Heath, wev. B. B. Cutler, Debt 2 00 

Holbrook, Wmthrop, by E. Holbrook and 

Rev. O. S. Dean 110 00 

Holland, by M. P. Bixby 20 00 

Holliston, Mrs S. G. Biirnap, Debt 5 00 

A Friend, by Mrs. S. G. B.,Debt 1 00 

Holyoke, Second, Y. P., by G. W. Brain- 

erd, Debt 100 00 

Hopkinton, Est. of Eliza W. Jenks, by E. 

J. Jenks, Exec't 1 63 

33 75 Ipswich, First, by N. R. Farley 80 00 

6 6n Kingston, Mayflower, by Rev. J. Crowell. 16 00 

5 00 Lanesville, Mrs. Eltza Haraden, Debt 25 00 

3 00 Lawrence, United, by Rev. J. T. Whalley 6 25 
Leominster, Orth., by M. E. McDonnell, 

10 00 Debt 20134 

Leverett, Y. P., by C. F. Frary, Debt.. . 3 30 

9 34 Lexington, Hancock, b^ Rev. E. G. Por- 

12 50 ter 17 00 

Y. P.. bv Mrs. C. C. Goodwin, "one 

5 00 share of the $25,000," Debt 34 00 

Lincoln, A Friend. " F," Debt 10 00 

25 00 Littleton, A Friend, Debt 100 00 

25 00 Y. P., by Miss Martha H. Kimball, Debt 13 42 



10 00 



28 75 



4 00 


100 0(1 


142 50 


21 70 


13 fO 


13 


16 


5 00 


5 00 


5 d0 


302 00 


1 00 



38 



?HE HOME MISSIONARY. 



May 



LiOQgme adow, East, Y. P., by Mary R. 

Mclntosn, Debt 

Lowell, " In Mem jria," Debt 

Kirk St., Y. P., by Ohas. E. Edson, Debt. 
Union Service of Rev. W. G. Pudde- 

foot, by I. W. Bisbee, Debt 

Lynn, Norm, Y. P., by Mary ManweJl, 

Debt 

Lynnfield, Center, by Rev. H. L. Briekett. 

Maiden, First, by Herbert Porter 

Maplewood, First, Mon. Con., by Mrs. H. 

M. Johnson .' 

Marblehead, Stone, Y. P., by Heury L. 

Blaoey, Debt 

Marion, S. D. Hadley 

Massachusetts, A Fiiend, " L,'' Debt 

Medfleld, Second, by F. S. Wight 

Medford, West, Howard Ave., by E. C. 

Smith 

Oong'l Ch,. Mrs. Margaret M. Fletch- 
er 

Med way, West, Second, Y. P., by Rev. 

A. H. Fuller, Debt 

Middleboro', by A. L. Tinknam (of which 
$30 by self to const. Geo. H. Shaw a L. 

M.) 

North, A friend 

Middleton, Y. P., by Lillian P. Fletcher, 

Debt 

Milton, First, Evang'l, by O. W. Sears 

Sunday-school, by W. R. Hill, with 
other gifts, to const. O. W. Sears 

L. M., Debt 

Y. P., by John L. Carter, to const. 

A. H. Tucker L. M, Debt, 

Millbury, Second, Y. P., by C. H. Liu- 

culn. Debt 

Neponset, Trin. Sunday-school, by J. F. 
Barnes, Special for $5,600 Bjnemian 

Fund 

New Bedford. .North, by J. W. Hewey.. 
Newbury, First, by Edward Perkins 

(add'l to Feb. djn) 

Newburyport, Prospect St., by ' B. G. 

Gernsh 

Newton. A friend, Debt 

A friend M. A. C, Debt 

Auburnaale, bv C. C. Burr, Debt 

Y. P., by C. C. Burr, Debt 

Center, Firs', by Geo. M. Stone 

By C. H. Bennett (add'l), Debt 

Miss Maria Coaflin, Debt 

Northampton, First, Y. P., by Wm. S. 

Kellogg, Debt .* 

North Brjokneld, First, by A. G. Scone.. 

Union, by J. W. Hird, Debt 

Union Service of Rev. W. G. Puude- 

fojf, by Hiram Knight, Debt 

Peru, "Harriet B. Stowell" 

PuillipstoD, Sunday-sohoo , by J. A. Lamb. 

Debt 

Pittsfield, First, by Frank W. Dutton, 

Debt 

Ojiincy, Atlantic, Memorial, by Rev. F. 

L. Bristol 

Primary Sunday-school, by Miss E. F. 

Merrill, Debt 

Y. P., by Mary E. Lavers, Debt 

A friend, "M.," Debt 

Randolph, Geo. B. Belcaer Debt 

Salem, South, Y. P., by A., L. Goodrich, 

Debt 

Saundersville, by A. E. Gurney 

Y. P., by B. F. Perkins, Debt 

Shelburne, by Z. D. Bard well. Debt 

Y. P., by MissLydia Fiske, Debt 

Shelbame Fall', Y. P., by C. H. Ball, 

Debt . 

Sherborn, Pilgrim, by L. Coolidge 

Shirley, Rev. C.H.Whitney, Debt 

Shrewsbury, by L. N.Smith 

Somerville. First Orth. Cen. Coll., by E. 

D. Conant 

Prospect Hid, Y. P. by Caas. Silsbee" 
Debt ... 



$26 75 

5 00 

6 00 


90 00 


5 00 
15 00 
87 00 


13 11 


22 60 
10 00 
10 Oil 
96 00 


26 67 


20 00 


32 50 


99 01 
50 00 


5 60 
19 31 



50 00 
i9 67 

20 40 
7 60 



1 85 

2 10 
31 50 

i, 00 



6 52 

9S 87 

1 00 

V.i 
50 00 
5 00 
30 00 
150 63 
18 i.6 
25 00 
5 00 

100 00 
75 00 
10 75 

18 98 
5 00 



2 00 

5 00 

14 50 
1 00 

10 00 

70 00 

15 00 
10 00 

9 00 

5 00 

27 25 
30 00 
10 15 
45 73 

6 07 
50 0o 



West, Day St., by Peter Gray $5 05 

Southbridg'e, by F. W. Eaton 91 66 

Mrs. Mary F. Leonard, Debt 50 00 

Spencer, by F. E. Dunton 31160 

Snringfield, Hope, Y. P., by Emily F. 

"Ellis, Debt 110 91 

Olivet, Y. P., by G. E. Buchanan, Debt 32 00 
Stockbridge, Y. P. (of which A friend 

$20.00), by Agnes W. Canning, Debt... 62 80 
Stoneharn, by Rev. D. A. Newton, Debt 9 17 

Rev. D. A- Newton, Debt 2S 00 

Stoughton, First, by D. C. Rose, M.D. . . . 6 41 
Sturbridge, bv Melvin Haynes, to const. 
W. G. Reed, M.D., L. M. of A. H. M. S. 67 30 
Bullock Fund, in charge of Rev. M. L. 

Richardson, Debt 20 00 

Sunderland, Y. P., by Kate P. Arms, 

Debt 

Taunton, Uuiou, by Rev. E. N. Pomeroy 
Templeton, by Dea. John Wnittemore. . 

Tolland, by J. P. Hall 

Townsend, by J. N. Boutelle 27 01 

Tyngsboro, Evan., by Mrs. Wm. Sher- 
burne 

Upton, Mrs. Susan H. Rockwood, Dfbt.. 
West, Y. P., by Alfred T. Wood, Debt 

Walpole, " A Friend" 

Orth., by Frederick Guild 52 36 

Ware, Young Ladies' Miss. Soc, by 

Florence E. Sturtevant, Debt 27 50 

East, Anson Bassett, by Hon. Wm. 

Hyde 

Wayland, "L.," Debt 

Weilesley, Y. P., by Allie Tailbv, Debt.. 
Wellfleet, South, by Rev. J. S. Gay, spe 

cial 

" Levitical Fifth" , 

Wenham, by W. E. Porter 

Westboro, Ev. Sunday-school, by Chas. L 

Adams, Debt 

West Brookfleld, Weekly ottering, bv C. 

T. Huntington, Debt "... 15 20 

We3ttielil, Second, Y.P., by James R. Sa- 

very, Debt 55 30 

West Hampton, Ladies' Bonev. Soc, oy 

Louisa J. Montague, Debt 20 00 

Y. P., by Louisa J. Montague, Debt 46 00 

Weymouth, First, by E. Humphrey f 4 63 

South Second, by Rev. H. C. Alvord, 
with previous gifts, to const. Rev. H. 
C. Alvord and John G. Hutchins L. 
Ms. of M. H. M. S. and Clarence W. 

Fearing L. M. of A. H. M. S 

Whitman, Y. P., by Mis. Sarah P. Smith, 

Debt 

Williamsburg, First, Y. P., by Fidelia 

Warner, Debt 

Winchester, First, by Eugene Tappan 

A friend, " P," special for Bohemian 

work 

Windsor, by Rev. J. R. Flint 

Worcester, First, by Geo. M. Pierce, to 

const. Mrs. Clara W. Hawes L. M 

Piedmont, by Wm. Woodward 40 oo 

Plymouth, by Jonas Wmte, Debt 292 50 

Sunday-school, by Jonas White, Debt 12 26 

Y. P., Jonas White, Debt 14 00 

Twoladies, Debt . 2 00 

Union, by S. Newton, Debt 270 20 

Sunday-school, by E. A. Merrill, Deot 80 79 
David Whitcomb, to const. Mr. and 
Mrs. Rufus M. Taf t L. Ms 1,000 00 



5 00 

5 00 

10 00 


12 50 
2 50 
8 50 



27 75 



47 00 
52 25 



20 (0 
31 75 



5 00 
4 00 



48 00 



Home Missionary. 



$11,488 69 
9 50 



$11,498 19 

The returns marked Y. P. are nearly all from 
" Y. P. S. C. E." bodies. A few are from the 
Young People under various names. It was 
thought best, therefore, to use the general 
name rather than the specific. 

It may be that some of the returns, not so 
marked, are for the " Deb r ," but only such 



1887 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



39 



gifts as were particularly designated for that 
purpose were so credited. 
The appropriation of $2,"00 will more than cover 
all, anil each donor can l>e grateful I hat his 
offering aided in the happy deliverance. 

E. B. P. 

Donations of Clothing, etc., received at the o/Jice oj 

the Mass. Home Miss. Soc. in March. 
Andover, Uallurdvale, Ladies, by Mrs. 

Bowker, barrel and freight $37 00 

Ashby, Ladies' Char. Soc, by Airs. F. W. 

Wright, package 1200 

Ashland, Home Gleaners, by L. M. Met- 

calf, barrel and freight 51 04 

Bernards ton, by Mrs. J. P. Clark, sacque, 

unappraised. 
Boston, from Everett Lane, box of cloth- 
ing, unappraised. 
Daltou, Lidiej' Sewing Soc, by Clara L. 

Crane, barrel and parcel, with freight. 130 00 
Dorchester, Second, Y. People's Miss. 

Circle, by Miss P. L. Vose, barrel and 

freight 9135 

Newton, Eliot, Ladies, by Mrs. A. E 

Crosby, barrel 134 03 

Pittstifld, First, Free Will Soc, by Mrs. 

M. B. Davis, barrel and freignt 74 00 

Salem. South, Ladies' H. M. Sue, by A. 

M . Farrington, 2 barrels 175 00 

Somerville, West, Day St., by Mrs. H. B. 

Wilder, barrel and freight 116 0C 

$823 42 



Receipts of the Missionary Society of Connecticut, 
in March, Ward W. Jacobs, Treas. 



Berlin, by Rev. VY. W. Wood worth 

Kensington, by Rev. A. J. Benedict... 

Canterbury, First, one-sixth of income 
of bequest of Emblem L. Williams, by 
L. B. Morgan, Trustee, of Plainfield. . . 

En held, by Albert AbDe, $35, for A. H. 
M. S, $i'^5 

Glastonbury, First, by John B. Moseiey. 

South, H. D. Hale, personal, for debt 

of A. H. M. S., to constitute Rev. 

Marcus Burr of South Glastonbury, 

Ct.,a L. M 

Hamden, Whitneyville, by F. T. Jarmau 

Hartford, Asvtnm Hill, by C. E. Thomp- 
son, $16; Rev. W. H. Moore, personal, 

$125 

Windsor Ave., E. VV. Belden, personal. 

Ililliuarly, South, by Rev. Wm. H. Beard 

Killinarworth, by N. H. Evarts 

Litchfield, Milton, by Rev. Geo. J. Har- 
rison 

New Haver , Dixwell Ave., by W. H. Han- 
som 

Howard Ave., by F. T. Jarraan 

New London, First, by C. D. Boss, Jr., 
quarterly 

North Canaan, by A. B. Garfield 

North Haven, by Whitney Elliott, $112; 
additional, $33; add'l, $2 ; by Rev. W. T. 
Reynolds, $5; Society of Christian En- 
deavor, for debt of A. H. M.S., $7 

Oxford, by R. B. Limburner 

Thomiston, b/ P. Darrow, $26.97; for 
debt of A. H. M. S., $45.55 

Trumbull, by Rev. N. T. Merwin 

Voluntown and Sterling, Ekonk, by Rev. 
John Elderkin 

Windsor, First, by S. H. Barber, for A. 

H. M. S 

Poquonock, by L. K. Lord 



$5 00 

10 00 



160 00 
265 50 


50 00 
32 56 


141 00 

5 00 

8 00 

17 00 


5 00 


12 00 
23 00 


35 51 
17 14 


159 00 
32 53 


72 52 
22 00 


18 CO 


30 00 

48 37 



Receipts of the Illinois Komi Missionary Society 
in February, Aakon B. Mead, Tr<as. 

Atkinson, Kev. Geo. L. Dickinson $5 80 

Champaign, Sunday-school 20 80 

Chicago, First 100 00 

Walter Hill 25 00 

New England 56 23 

South German 5 00 

South Park 7 00 

Oakley Ave. Mission 5 00 

Dongola, special 95 94 

Knglewood, North Oh., special * 40 63 

Forrest 30 00 

Galesburg, First Cong., Woman's Miss. 

Soc 30 00 

First Oh., of Christ, $53.00; "A 
Widow," $1.00 ; Rev. J. D. Wyckoff, 
$25, special 

Geueseo 

Ilhui, Ladies' Bible class 

Jacksonville, Ladies' H. M. Soc 

James M. Longley 

Jefferson 

Lombard, Woman's Miss. Soc, for work 
outside the St ate 

Lyonsville, Young People 

Mattoon, Sunday-school 

Moline, Ladies' Mission Circle 

Odell, special 

Ontario 

Peru. 



Princeton, special 

Sheffield 

Thawville 

Waukegan 

Winnetka, $44.00 ; special. $33.00. . . 

Wjanet ' 

Wyoming, Woman's Miss. Soc 

Mrs. J. D. Whitelaw, for the Debt.. 

Rev. E. A. Adams 

Rev. A. Ethridge, special 



79 00 
146 67 

6 00 
35 00 

1 CO 
15 00 

10 00 
10 65 
6 00 
6 25 
28 60 
24 30 
6 50 
50 00 
118 00 

10 00 

1 00 

77 00 
23 50 
10 00 

2 00 
5 00 

10 00 



$1,179 4S 



Cromwell, Ladies Soc. Box, value $67 00 



$1,100 17 

Receipts of the Wisconsin Home Missionary So- 
ciety for March, R. A. McCullough, Treas. 

Alderly S5 0u 

Appleton 66 08 

Arena, W. H. M. S 4 us 

Beloit, First, $219.69 ; W. H. M. S., $10.85. ',30 54 

Clintonville, $29: W. H. M. S., $1.50 30 50 

Darlington, $47; S. S.,$6 53 vo 

Oelevan, S. S 9 57 

Eau Claire 50 00 

Fon du Lac, $90.75 ; W. H. M. S., $io". . . '. '. loo 75 

Janesville, W. H. M. S 50 

Lake Geneva, Mrs. M. Bernard 15 to 

Leeds, W. H. M. s 550 

Milwaukee, Plymouth, •• Helping Hands!" 50 00 

Mukwanago 500 

Mondovi :::;::.':.'.' sm 

Necedah in 00 

Platteville 55 00 

pittsvine ;;•.".;; '^so 

Roberts 10 00 

Sparta, W. H. M. S 8 40 

$729 52 

Receipts of the Iowa Home Missionary Society in 
January, J. H. Mekkill, Esq., Treas. 

Alden, Ladies $5 tio 

Almoral 300 

Arlington ".'.'.'.'."'.'.'.'" i 00 

Baxter, Rev. Thos. Merrill 5 00 

Berwick 2 70 

Burlington !........"..'! 17 37 

Cass 90 00 

Cedar Rapids, Mission S. S a f « 

Central, City, W. H. U '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 5(0 



40 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



May, 1887, 



Cherokee, P. E. vVhitmore $100 00 

Chester Center, $«!9.59 ; Ladies, $13.64 ... . 43 23 

Clay, Young Ladies 5 00 

Corning 8 10 

Cresco, $10.R0; S. 8., $7.14 17 64 

Davenport, Germau Ch 10 00 

Denmark 15 00 

Des Moines, Plymouth Ch 183 25 

Ladies 31 50 

Dunlap 12 40 

Dm ant. Young Ladies 6 00 

Rev. P. Lawson 2 00 

Earlville, Ch 10 00 

Eldora, Ladies 10 00 

Farragut 20 00 

Gowrie 2<0 

Grinnell 64 50 

Friends 42 00 

W. H. M. U 12 33 

Hastings Y mng Workers 3 07 

Humboldt, Ladies 2 60 

Iowa City. Mis. C. L. McDerniid 2 00 

L^ng Creek, Welch Ch 4 15 

Marion, Y. P. Miss. Soc 35 00 

McGregor, $18.17; W. Miss. Soc, $17.55. 35 72 

Miles, Ladies 10 00 

Montour, $2-i,64 ; Ladies, $1.50 22 14 

Oakland 13 00 

Osage, Woman's Miss. Soc 7 36 

OsKaloosa 98 35 

Polk City, $12 ; Friends, $2.35 14 3* 

Postville, $39.52; Sunday-school Soc, $5. 44 52 

Ladies' ivliss. Soc 10 00 

Prairie City, Ladies Too 

Rice 'ille 5 00 

Sioux City, First Ch., Ladies 16 30 

Pilgrim Ch 12 30 

Sunday-school 1 25 

Tipton, Ch 18 00 

Y. P. S. C. E 5 00 

Rev. and Mrs. A. G. Brande 5 00 

Union, $16.5»i; Rev. W. C. Hicks $5 21 50 

Warren 125 

Wells, Ladies' Miss. Soc 3 Oj 

Total $1,073 98 



Receipts of the Ioiva Home Missionary Society, in 
February ana March, Rev. T. O. Douglass, 
Treas. 

Algona, Ladies' Miss. Soc $7 25 

Almoral 50 

Anamosa, Ladies 2 40 

Anita 36 75 

Belknap 3 30 

Burlington, Ladies 55 50 

West, Ladies 5 00 

Cass 9 50 

Cedar Fall3 25 00 

Central City 18 50 

Center Poiut 5 00 

Cherokee, C. C. Click 2 0" 

Cincinnati 8 00 

Ladies "12 00 

Clinton 54 46 

Cresco 19 57 

Creston, First 21 40 

S. S 10 81 

Danville 11 50 

Davenport 51 50 

Rev. J. A.Reed 50 00 



Decorah $70 oo 

Denmark, S. s 300 

Des Moines, Plymouth 12 00 

Ladies 58 00 

S. S 50 60 

Dubuque, First 75 31 

Eldora 35 05 

Emmet tsburg 13 25 

Woman's Miss. Union 5 00 

Exira 12 50 

Fairfield 25 00 

Ladies 14 10 

Fayette, Rev. A. S. Houston 5 00 

Fontanelle 9 00 

Fort st City 3 00 

Rev. C. F. Dykeman 3 00 

Fort Atkinson 10 00 

F.>rt D >dge 25 00 

Franklin 2 50 

Genoa Bluff, Birthday offerings 3 71 

Glenwood, D. C. Briggs 5 00 

Grand View 39 50 

G rinnell 28 25 

W. H. M. U 39 45 

Bf quest of C. W. Hobart 400 00 

Rev. J. M. Chamoerlain 100 00 

Friends 40 00 

Hawthorn 2 50 

Ladies l 19 

Iowa City, Ladies' Sewing Soc 5 00 

Mrs. R. M. McLam 2 00 

Jewell 539 

Jefferson, D. B. Eells 10 00 

Kelley 8 50 

Keokuk, S. S 11 33 

Lansing 7 25 

Lansing Ridge, Ladies 7 00 

S. S 2 00 

Lewis S. S 5(0 

Lima 50 

Loyan, Ladies 3 50 

Magnolia, W.H. M. U 5 00 

Manchester, Ladies 10 00 

Manson 3 00 

Maquoketa 3 93 

Virion, W. M. S 3130 

Mason City 25 69 

McGregor 5 uO 

Missionary Band 10 00 

Milton, J. D.Nasn 5 00 

Mt. Pleasant, M. A. Hillis 4 70 

Muscatine 93 00 

New Providence, W. M. S 3 fO 

Osage 1211 00 

Oskaloosa, Mary A. Nichols 5 00 

Otho 4 75 

Polk City 61O 

Postville 5 00 

Ricevilie 99 70 

Sheldon 109 00 

Soldier River 2 00 

Strawberry Point 8 58 

Busy Bees 3 50 

Traer 6 62 

A Friend 5 00 

Union 43 00 

Ladies 47 62 

Van Cleve 20 no 

Waucoma S. S 17 00 

Wavei ly 3 50 

Webster. S. S 3 65 

Wittemburg, Thank offering 36 10 

I $2,308 59 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 




(XjIQ-TJIID) 

A preparation of the phosphates of lime, magnesia, potash and iron with phosphoric acid 
n such form as to be readily assimilated by the system. 

Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. Horsford, of Cambridge, Mass. 

FOR DYSPEPSIA, 
Jttental and Physical Exhaustion, Weakened En- 
ergy, JYervousness, Indigestion, Etc, . 

Universally recommended and prescribed by physicians of all schools. Its action will 
harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 

It is the best tonic known, furnishing sustenance to both brain and body It makes a 
delicious drink with water and sugar only. 

Invigorating, Strengthening, Healthful, Refreshing. 

rnces reasonable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free. Manufactured by the 

Rumford Chemical Works, Providence, R. I. 
^BEWARE OF IMITATIONS! ~j 

MASON & HAMLIN MASON & HAMLIN 



IMPROVED 

UPRIGHT PIANOS, 

f 1 Heir Impyeu Method of strinone 

PATENTED JULY 24th 1883. 

.CHARACTERIZED BY 

BRIGHTEST, PUREST TONES, 

GREATEST DURABILITY, 
IMPROVED METHOD OF STRINGING. 

The Strings beings directly secured to the 
iron triune by metal fastenings will not re- 
quire tuning one-quarter as often as 
Pianos on the old system. 

This new mode of Piano construction invented 
by Mason & Hamlin in 1882, has been fully proved, 
many excellent experts pronouncing it the "great- 
est improvement made in pianos of th3 century." 

WARRANT. Each Piano will be accom- 
panied by the fullest warrant. Determined 
to achieve the very highest reputation for 
their pianofortes, should tlefect develop 
itself in any one, the Company will be more 
eager to correct it tban the purchaser can 
be to have them. 

Pianos can be rented if preferred, at moderate 
cost, with privilege of purchase. 



ORGANS. 



vvoru.0 




THE WHOLE WORLD says: 
At every Great World's Exhibition since 1867, these 

organs have been awarded the Highest Honors. 
Supplied to Her Majesty Queen Victoria. 
Used in Westminster Abbey. 
Used in St. James's Hall. 
Alwavs used by Mr. Ira D. Sankey, 

After having used a Mason &Hamlin'Organ eight 
years at Corisco Island, off the western coast of 
Equatorial Africa, the Eev. CD. Heer, Missionary 
writes: 

"This is tbe only organ, American or European, 
that has not gone to pieces within six months of 
its arrival." 



100 Styles, $22 to : 



Catalogues free. 



MASON & HAMLIN Organ and Piano Co. 

BOSTON* 154 TREMONT STREET; NEW YORK, 46 EAST 14TH ST 
UNION SQUARE) CHICAGO, 149 WABASH AVE. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



THE "MANHATTAN" 

OF NEW YORK., 

IS 6 and IS 8 Broadway, 



" All men think all men mortal but themselves," but there is nothing like a spe 
of sickness to shake one's confidence in the stability of his health and the permanency of 
physical life. We seem somehow to entertain (vaguely, it may be) the idea that life 
insurance may be very properly safely deferred until there are premonitions of declining 
health. This is like waiting for a fire to occur iD your neighborhood and then running to 
seek fire insurance when the conflagration is threatening your own house. It is too late 
then to get insurance. The bitter reflection: "It might have been," may then be timely 
enough ; but wishes have no power on that day to evoke from the ashes the presence of the 
protective policy to restore the property lost by our folly. 

Take insurance on your life kow. The new plan of the Manhattan will not only cover 
the contingency of death, but be a saving fund for yourself, to be resorted to in your ad- 
vanced age. 

JAMES M. McLEAN, President. 

J. L. HALSEY, 1st Vice-Prest. H. B. STOKES, 2d Vice-Prest, 
H. Y. WEMPLE, Secretary. S. N. STEBBINS, Actuary, 

AGENTS WANTED. — Active, reliable, and persevering men who desire agencies in the 
State of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, and Missouri are invitpd to 
correspond with the company direct. 



THE INDEPENDENT. 



" One of the ablest -weeklies in existence."— Pall Mall Gazette, London, England. 

" The most influential religious organ in the States."— The Spectator, London, Eng- 
and. 

" Clearly stands in the fore-front as a weekly religious magazine'"— Sunday- 
school Times, Philadelphia. 

It is a Newspaper, Magazine, and Review all in one. It is a religious, a literary, an educa- 
tional, a story, an art, a scientific, an agricultural, a financial, and a political paper combined, 
has thirty-two folio pages and twenty-two departments. 

No matter what a person's religion, politics, or profession may be, no matter what his age, em- 
ployment or condition may be, THE INDEPENDENT will prove a help, an instructor, an educator. 

Its yearly subscription is $3.00, or two years for $5.00. 

A month's " Trial Trip," thirty cents. 

Specimen copies, and prospectus for 1887, sent free to any address on receipt of postal card. 

THE INDEPENDENT, 

P. O. Box 2787. 251 BROADWAY, N. Y. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY 



S&esnai&aMe Ftasuaeial Results. 

EXPERIENCE OF POLICY-HOLDERS IN THE 

MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., OF NEW YORK. 

The wonderful financial results achieved by The Mutual Life Insurance Company of New 
York have attracted the attention of the people at large, and are particularly gratifying to 129,000 
members of this Institution. 

The Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York has now in trust for policy-holders $114,- 
181,963, and it has paid out since its organization over $243,ooo,ooo to the holders of its policies. 

As an evidence of the wise managament and admirable investment of its funds, the following 
list of payments for death claims in 1886 has been published, showing what the cost of insurance is 
in this Company. It will be seen that for every dollar paid by the insured to the Mutual Life, th<: 
Company returned $2.68 to the policy-holder. 

Net Amount 

Total Amount Returned 

Ciaims of Cash by Com- 

Paid by Paid by pany for 

Company. Insured. Each Dol- 
lar Rec'd. 
$2 68 

January 8 $134,675 40 $65,038 79 $2 58 

» 15 133,143 52 59,929 45 2 22 

•' 22 93,306 84 34,153 91 2 70 

" 29 106,453 92 29,255 44 3 63 

February 5 53,035 37 17.78144 2 98 

" 12 120,306 33 44,150 46 2 72 

" 19 81,948 09 3S.546 18 2 12 

" 26 57,757 26 15,52153 3 72 

March 5 145,359 86 59,6^2 29 2 43 

" 12 97,530 72 32,682 56 2 98 

" 19 65,14690 20,71023 3 14 

" i6 1 64,886 76 55,828 93 2 95 

April 2 133,943 52 47,402 15 2 82 

" 9 76,260 32 23.5S6 52 3 24 

" 16 149,919 18 60,843 59 2 46 

" 23 96,152 61 32.358 44 2 97 

" 30 93,469 87 40,56S 81 2 37 

May 7 •.. 84,81104 23,795 56 3 56 

" 14 127,407 77 51,242 94 2 48 

" 21 : 92,7S5 05 34,819 68 2 66 

" 2S 116,189 S7 42,962 50 2 70 

June 4 135,819 45 50,159 20 2 70 

" 11 169,180 70 51,163 00 3 30 

" 18 101,9t9 64 35,348 90 2 88 

" 25 160,341 97 65,584 64 2 44 

July 2 80,967 18 30,485 44 2 66 

'• 9 127,095 08 47,947 29 2 60 

" 16 123,026 46 43,70136 2 71 

" 23 23,228 20 55,907 57 2 20 

" 80 104,207 32 37,76196 2 76 

August 6 97,327 59 26,989 93 3 51 

" 13 95,510 28 48,232 18 3 20 

" 20 91,250 81 2S,584 19 3 19 

" 27 87,957 00 33,868 14 5 50 

September 3 90,444 76 38,234 68 2 52 

" 10 S4,915 00 45,437 11 187 

" 17 87,324 74 25,929 95 3 36 

" 24 60,254 95 22,307 65 2 70 

October 1 127,064 22 46,394 73 2 73 

" 8 84,41161 30,610 11 2 75 

" 15 71,449 97 27.S5S 19 2 56 

" 22 77,017 50 30,788 27 2 50 

" 29 195,174 59 93,333 34 2 09 

November 5 73,S24 49 27,98118 2 63 

•' 12 103,72120 33,558 03 3 09 

" 19 101,98147 33,188 03 3 07 

" 26 62,100 88 18,9S0 29 3 27 

December 3 103,046 04 38,495 88 2 80 

10 145,500 03 54.507 13 2 66 

" 17 135, 124 46 50,725 38 2 66 

" 23 66,797 32 26,436 24 3 52 

" 30 87,358 88 34,91139 2 50 

$5,492,920 00 $2,048,222 78 

The average duration of these policies was 14.4 years, and thus it will be seen that the holders 
thereof received ail the premiums hack, improved at lv% per cent, compound interest. 

It is unnecessary to remark that there is no other form of investment so profitable as this, and 
the security is found in The Largest Company in the world. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



Missionaries 



OF THE 



A. Hi IYK. Si 



May now have a first-class Sewing Machine 
without paying the usual prices charged by 
Manufacturers and their agents. 

READ THIS. 

Any missionary in the service of the A. H. M. S. 
can, by sending an order on the Society for the 
amount, receive a Sewing Macuine as shown 
below at 60 per cent, discount off ttie prices 
stated, and can let the payments be made at the 
rate of $2.00 per month If they so desire. Or 10 
per cent, further discount will be allowed if the 
full amount is paid in cash on delivery of 
machine. Read the following " ad." and send 
for an illustrated catalogue, which will give full 
particulars. 

No.l $45.00 . No.4 $60.00. 

No.2 50.00 No. 5 5T.50. 

No. 3 55.00 No. 6 65.00. 



AVWY 



This cut shows a No 
4 Machine 




New improved high arm, new mechanical princi- 
ples and rotary movements, automatic, direct and 
perfect action, cylinder shuttle, self-setting needle, 
positive feed, no springs, few parts, minimum 
weight, no friction, no noise, no wear, no fatigue, 
no 'tantrums," capacity unlimited, always in or- 
3er, richly ornamented, nickel plated, and gives 
perfect satisfaction. Send for circulars. Adores*, 

IB am 5EW1H5 MACHINE AGENCY, 

77 Chambers St., New York. 

P. O. Box 2002. 



THE BLACK VALLEY RAILROAD, 

A Map of the Black Valley Country, show- 
ing' trainsloaded with travelers en route for Fools- 
port, Fightington. Prisonton. BeggarstowD, Ms- 
niacville. Idiot Flats. Demonland, etc. Colored 
Lithograph, 18 by 24 inches, mounted for hanging 
up. 5u cents by mail. " The best Temperance Lec- 
ture I know of."— Bev. C. L. Goodell. D.D. "In- 
comparable as an exhibition of truth."— John B. 
Gough. " Should be upon the walls of every Sab- 
batn-School."— Rev. T. L. Cuyleb, D.D. Same 
painted on canvas, 16x8 feet, for Lectures and S.-S. 
Concerts. Loaned to Pastors and Superintendents. 
Address.CRYSTAL BIVER SOCIETY.Boston.Mass 

THINK FOR YOURSELF. 

IF YOU ABE 

A SENSIBLE WOMAN 

AND BELIEVE THAT 

Health, Comfort, and Beauty 

ARE DESIRABLE THTJfGS, 




6000 SENSE 



CORDED CORSET WAISTS. 

Beautifully made of BEST 
MATERIALS throughout. 
THOl SANDS NOW IN USE. 

%W Be sure your Corset is 
stamped "Good Sense." 
FIT ALL, AGES-Infants 
to Adults. Sold by 

iMS RETAILERS 

everywhere. Send for circular. 

FERRIS BROS^anufactnrers, 

341 Broadway, NEWTOPK. 

MARSHALL FIELD & CO. CHICAGO, 

WHOLESALE WESTEKN AGENTS. * ' 



AMONG THE CONTRIBUTORS 

TO 

THEINDEPENDENT 

IN 

MARCH, 1887 
Were the following : 

Robert Louis Stevenson. 
Theodore L. Cuyler, D.D. 
Andrew Lang, England. 
Phillips Brooks, D.D. 
Kate Foote. 

Mrs. Schuyler Van Rensselaer. 
The Late Philip Bourke Marston. 
Edith M. Thomas. 
James Payn, England, 
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, 
Geo. F. Pentecost. 
Rose Hawthorne Lathrop. 
Maurice Thompson. 
Send 30c. in stamps for a month's " Trial Trip." 
THE INDEPENDENT, 

251 Broadway N. T 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 

This Monthly is furnished at sixty cents a year, postage paid. The subscription price 
oonld not well be less. Its whole present issue should go to actual subscribers. But, unless they 
prefer to pay, it will be sent free, as heretofore, to Life Directors and Life Members ; Mis- 
sionaries of the Society and its Auxiliaries ; Ministers securing a yearly collection for it in 
their congregations ; also, to every individual, Association, or Congregation, one, copy for 
every ten dollars collected and paid over to the Society or an Auxiliary. Suitable name 
should accompany the payment. Pastors are earnestly requested to serve Home Missions by 
promoting the use of this Journal at the Monthly Concert and among their people. 

Immediate notice of the discontinuance or change of post-office address should be given. 

APPLICATIONS FOR AI1>. 

Congregations desiring aid should apply at once after finding a minister. They should 
make a full statement of the facts in their condition and prospects which justify an applica- 
tion. They should also give thsse particulars, viz. : 

Population of the place. 

Names of the church or churches, and preaching stations 

Number of church-members. 

Average of congregation. 

Denomination and size of contiguous congregations. 

Names and distances of the nearest Congregational churches. 

Minister's full name and post-office address : Town, County, State 

Does he reside en his field of labor? Is he installed pastor? 

Has he any other calling than that of the ministry? 

Of what local church is he a member? 

Of what Ministerial Association ? 

The number of persons composing his family 

Total amount of salary proposed. 

Amount pledged by the people and how secured. 

Has he, also, the use of a parsonage? 

Is aid expected from any other source ? 

The least amount that will suffice from the A. H. M. 8. 

The amount received from this Society last year. 

Will less probably be needed next year?. 

Amount contributed to this Society last year. How raised. 

Amount contributed to other benevolent societies. 

Additional statements concerning the condition, prospects, and wants of the field. 

Date of the desired commission. 

The application must be signed by the officers of the church, where there is one, and by 
the trustees or a committee of the congregation. 

If the ecclesiastical body, within who^e limits the congregation is found, has a "Com- 
mittee of Missions," the members ot that committee should certify these statements, the stand- 
ing of the minister, his prospects of usefulness there, and indorse the application. If no 
such " Committee of Missions " exists, the application should be indorsed by two or more 
neighboring clergymen acquainted with the facts. If no church or congregation is yet 
athered, applicants will follow the same course, as far as practicable. 

Applications, after being so indorsed, should be sent to the Superintendent (or Secretary 
of the Auxiliary) for the region where the applicants reside. 

Appropriations, as a rule, bear the date of a punctual application ; and they never cover 
more than one year. If further aid be needed, a new application is required, containing al 
the particulars named above, and indorsed as before. To this the certificate of the missionary 
that the congregation has fulfilled its previous pledges for his support, must be added. 

For the address of Superintendents and Secretaries of Auxiliaries, see p. 4 of cover. 

FORM OF A BEQUEST. 

I bequeath to my executors the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay over the same 

after my decease, to the person who, when the same is payable, shall act 

as Treasurer of the American Home Missionary Society, formed in the City of New York, in 

the year eighteen hundred and twenty-six, to bo applied tc the charitable uses and purposes of 

siidSocietv, and under its direction. 



MAY, 



1887. 



AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 

Bible House, Astor Place, New York. 

Rev. DAVID B. COE, D.D., Honorary Secretary. 
Rev. WALTER M. BARROWS, D.D.,) 
Rev. JOSEPH B. CLARK, D. D., \ Secretaries for Correspondence. 

Rev. ALEX'R H. CLAPP, D.D., Treasurer 
Executive Committee :-Mr. JOHN WILEY, Chairman; Mr. WM. HENRY SMITH • Rev WM M 

GEO L P SH^oT pfo A T S f ^"^ ^ ALF ™ * BARNES = ^K aI™' WOODRUFF; 
?EPH wSSK ? p'rS?";, RK V q AMES G - ROBERTS. D.D.; Rev. SAMUEL H. VIRGIN, D.D.; Mb. JO- 
SEPH WILLIAM RICE; Mr HERBERT M. DIXON; Ret. A. J. F.BEHRENDS D D • Mb FRAN- 
CIS FLINT; WM. IVES WASHBURN, Esq., Rcccrding Sec. H «*^> "■»■ - Mb. *RAN- 

COMMUNICATIONS 

Relating to the general business of the Society may be addressed to either of the Secretaries for 

r, ... , ,. Correspondence. 

Communications relating to the Woman's Department may be addressed to 

Communications relating to the Editors Department of The Z^Zo^n^yTL^lal * 

Mrs. H. S. Caswell, Bible House, N. Y. 

DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS 

ID bu a s!n 8 r' S s C mafte'rs Ke of iS THE **^t&^?3 ^TAT* t C ™™A™ V T S ^^ t0 th& 
dressed to Alex'b H. Clapp, ^b£^&^a!^SI^Z Si* 6 S ° Ciet7, mV be ' 
Post-Offlce Orders sliould be drawn on STATION D, New York City. 

A Payment of $50 c onstitutes a Life Member. ' 

SUPERINTENDENTS. 

Rev. HenbyA. Schauffleb, Work among Bohemians, Poles, etc.. Cleveland 
Rev. Geobge E. Albbecht, Work among Germans, Chicago 111 v " ieyemna ' u ' 
Rev. M. W. Montgomeby, Work among Scandinavians, Minneapolis, Minn. 



ad- 



Rev. Leboy Wabben, 

Rev. S. F. Gale, 
Rev. J. H. Mobley, 
Rev. Fbanklin B. Doe, 
R 3 v.Addison Blanchabd, 

Rev. C. C. Otis. 



Lansing, Mich. | Rev. John L. Maile, 
Ind. I Rev. Hieam D. Wiaed, 
Jacksonville, Fla. | Rev. H. C. Simmons, 
Rev. C. M. Sandebs. 



Minneapolis, Minn 

St. Louis, Mo 

Topeka, Kan. 

N. Mex. 



J. H. Wabben, D.D., 
G. H. Atkinson, D.D. 



3eattle, Wash. Ter.— Rev. Geo. A. Hood, 



SECRETARIES 
oe THE 

Rev. Jonathan E. Adams, Secretary, 

John L. Ceosby, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev. Edwabd H. Gbeeley, D.D., Secretary, 

Hon. Lyman D. Stevens, Treasurer, 

Rev. Chables S. Smith, Secretary, 

J. C. Emeey, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev. Joshua Coit, Secretary, 

Rev. Edwin B. Palmee, Treasurer, 

Edwin BaEEows, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev. William H. Moobe, Secretary, 

Wabd W. Jacobs, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev. Chables C. Cbeegan, D.D., Secretary, 

Alex'e H. Clapp, Treasurer, 

Rev. J. G. Feaseb, 

Alex'e H. Clapp, Treasurer, 

Rev. James Tompkins, Secretary, 

Aaeon B. Mead, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev. T. G. Grassie. , Secretary. 

R. A. McCollough, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev. T. O. Douglass, Secretary, 

J. H. Mebbill, E-jq., Treasurer, 



Omaha, Neb. 

Mitchell, Dak. 

Fargo, No. Dak. 

Denver, Col. 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Portland. Or. 

Ashland, Wis. 



AND TREASURERS 

AUXILIARIES. 

Maine Miss. Soc, 



Bangor, Me. 
Bangor, Me. 
N. Hamp. Home Miss. Soc, Concord, N. H. 
" Concord, N. H. 
Vermont Dom. '' 



Mass. Home Miss. Soc, } 

Rhode IsVd " * 

" << «< 

Miss. Soc of Conn., 
a a 

New Yoi k H. M. Soc, 

<( i. 

Ohio 
<< .. 

Illinois " 

a ti 

Ms. 
" .i 

Iowa " 



Montpelier, Vt. 
Montpelier, Vt. * 
22 Cong. House," 
Boston Mass. 

Providence. B. L 
Hartford, Conn. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
New York City. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
New York City. 
151 Washington 
St., Chicago, Id, 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Grinnell, la. 
Des Moines. la. 



HQ^h f 



THE 



/£ Z-9U&CK& 



Home Missionary. 



.TXJIVE, 18S7- 



CONTENTS. 



THAT KILLED DEBT 41 

THE ANNUAL MEETING 43 

FEATURES OF THE SARATOGA 

PROGRAMME 43 

NORTH DAKOTA 46 

FEEDING THE "B OOMER " 47 

feC \TTERED GRAVES 48 

A " SPRING-TIME " PARISH 48 

NO. SIR! 51 

FOR HIS SAKE 52 

M FAITHFUL OVER A FEW THINGS" 54 

CROOKED STICKS 56 

THE LOST BOOT 57 

FROM HONG-KONG, CHINA 58 

PUBLICATIONS OF THE- AMERI- 
CA N HOME MISSIONARY SOC. ... 60 

ROLL OF HONOR 61 

WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT. 63 



From Missionary Wives in Dakota. .,. 64 

Rogers Academy, Arkansas 65 

A Grateful Letter 66 

OUR YOUNG PEOPLE 67 

Letter No. 9 67 

Questions 68 

Banner State this Month 69 

Answers to Questions 21 and 22 69 

M-i-c-h-i-1-i-m-a-c-i-n-a-c 70 

MISSIONARY BOXES 71 

WOMAN'S STATE H. M. ORGANI- 
ZATIONS 72 

WOMAN'S FUND FOR FOREIGN 

WORK 72 

CHILDREN'S BOHEMIAN FUND .... 72 

HOME MISSION CIRCLES 72 

MISSIONARY APPOINTMENTS 7.3 

RECEIPTS 73 



Tol. LX. No. 2. 



NEW YORK. 
VM ERIC AN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 

Bible House, Astor Place. 



SIXTY .".CENTS 'A. YEAR, IN ADVANCE, POSTAGE PAID 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 

Go Preach the Gospel, Mark xvi. 15. 

How shall they preach except they be sent ? Rom. x. 15. 

VOL. LX. JUNE, 1887. No. 2. 



THAT KILLED DEBT! 

Shakspere makes Macbeth remark, " The time has been, that, 
when the brains were out, the man would die, and there an end." He 
could never have truly said that of the debts of benevolent societies. 
Knock out their brains as often as you will, "they rise again with" 
something more than " twenty mortal murders on their heads." 

Our May number told of the braining of the debt that had at one 
time run up as high as $52,000. It was really killed. At the closing 
of the sixty-first year's books the society owed no man anything but to 
love him, and had the small surplus of $2,155.89 in the treasury. From 
that day each mail has brought from brethren in the field their reports 
of work done and their just claims upon the treasury, which its re- 
ceipts were far too small to meet. The receipts in April were $14,- 
256.11 — a gain in the gifts of the living, we gratefully acknowledge, of 
$1,870 over April, 1886 — but the claims maturing and presented in that 
month were $27,415, or $11,000 more than the receipts. Far too 
closely to be pleasant, this looks like the brainless ghost of the dead 
debt rising again to torment its slayers. 

Shall his chilling presence sadden the coming feast at Saratoga"? 
Shall it cast a gloom over the workers and hamper the work of the New 
Year ? In the hands of the churches and individual friends of Home 
Missions there is money enough to carry forward all the work they 
have ordered to be done. In the end they will pay it, to the last cent. 
Who will show us where lies the wisdom of waiting, waiting, waiting 
till their administrative agents and their representatives in the field 
are at their wit's end, under depressing care and anxiety, instead of 
supplying the means to pay as we go, thus cheering the hearts and 
strengthening the hands of the workers? 

"Tell the churches just what you want," we are daily exhorted, 
' and you will get it." Well, we want to-day more than $10,000 for 
immediate remittance to missionaries. Before the annual meeting, 
June 7-9th, we shall want fully $30,000 more. Shall we get it ? The 
Lord move your willing hearts, dear readers, to say yes. 



42 TI.E HOME MISSIONARY. June, 

THE ANNUAL MEETING, 

Saratoga Springs, June 7-9, 1887. 

The officers of the American Home Missionary Society have made 
arrangements for reduced fares for persons attending the annual meet- 
ing in Saratoga, June 7-9, 1887, with the following list of roads which 
will accept return tickets issued under the certificate plan : 

Baltimore & Ohio (east of Parkersburg, Bellaire and Wheeling); 
Baltimore & Potomac ; Bennington & Rutland ; Boston & Albany (on 
business between common points in New England and points west of, 
but not including, Albany); Boston & Lowell; Boston, Hoosac Tunnel 
& Western ; Buffalo, New York & Philadelphia ; Buffalo, Rochester & 
Pittsburgh; Camden & Atlantic; Central Vermont; Delaware & Hud- 
son Canal Co.; Delaware, Lackawanna & Western; Fitchburg; Grand 
Trunk ; Lehigh Valley ; New York Central & Hudson River ; New 
York, Lake Erie & Western; New York, Ontario & Western; Norfolk 
& Western; Northern Central; Pennsylvania (except locally between 
Philadelphia and New York); Philadelphia & Erie ; Philadelphia & 
Reading (except locally between Philadelphia and New York); Phila- 
delphia, Wilmington & Baltimore ; Rome, Watertown & Ogdensburg ; 
Shenandoah Valley ; Troy & Boston ; W x est Jersey ; West Shore. 

All persons attending the annual meeting and entitled to the benefit 
of the concession, will pay fall first-class fare going to the meeting, and 
have a printed form which will be furnished on application to the offi- 
cers at the Bible House, JVew York, to be properly filled up and signed 
by the ticket agent at the starting-point. If the starting-point is not lo- 
cated on one of the roads included in the list here given, delegates will 
purchase to the most convenient point on one of those lines, and repur- 
chase by direct routes only, through to place of meeting. Return 
tickets will be sold at the agreed reduced fares only to those holding 
these forms properly filled and countersigned. The printed form will 
give all needed information as to the purchase and use of tickets. 

This concession will expire at the end of three days after adjourn- 
ment of the meeting, and will be available for continuous return trip 
tickets only — no stop-over privileges being allowed under the rules on 
tickets sold at less than regular fares. 

The local committee in Saratoga, Rev. T. W. Jones chairman, have 
secured large reductions in rates of board during the meetings, as per 
the following list. In communicating with houses the applicant will do 
well to name price at which board is desired, and ask for reply by return 
mail. 

houses at $1 per day. 

Franklin House, Church St.; Regent St. House. Regent St.; Mrs. 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 43 

C. H. Ballard, 135 Circular St.; Continental Hotel, Washington St.; 
Mrs. Gilbert, 5 Ellsworth Block, Henry St.; Mrs. Wright, 1 Ellsworth 
Block; Mrs. Weed, 39 Franklin St. (late Morey House); Mrs. Dougl ass, 
140 Regent St.; Mrs. F. D. Carpenter, 55 Phila St.; Mrs. Wm. H. 
Waring, Franklin St.; Bates House, Circular St.; Mrs. Dr. Carpenter, 
186 Regent St.; Mrs. Markell, 5 Washington St.; Mrs. Mabie, 23 Frank- 
lin St.; Dexter Cottage, Woodland Ave., near Broadway, two in room, 
$1 each ; one in room, $1.50. 

HOUSES AT $1 TO $1.25 PER DAY. 

Vermont House, $1.25 ; Washburn House, $1.25 ; Dr. Travers, 103 
Circular St.; Miss Swan, 30 Woodlawn Ave.; Broadway House, 522 
Broadway; W. J. Riggs, Preston House ; Mrs. Holmes, 63 Franklin St.; 
Columbian Place, Broadway., corner of Lake Ave.; Mrs. S. J. Walker, 
53 Spring St.; Elmwood Hall, Front St.; Miss Delia Pierce, 384£ Broad- 
way ; " Burrows House," opposite Dr. Strong's ; Circular St. (late of 
the Irving Hotel), $1.25 ; Hayden House, 101 Congress St. 

HOUSES AT $1.25 TO $1.50 PER DAY. 

Dr. Hamilton, Franklin St., $1.25 and $1.50 ; Mrs. Geo. Weller, 52 
Washington St., $1.25 and $1.50 ; Rawson St., 61 Spring St.; Spencer 
House, Woodlawn Ave.; Mrs. Deuel, 109 Phila St., $1.50; Summer 
Rest, 75 Spring St., two in a room, $1.25 — single, $1.50; Holden 
House, Broadway. 

HOUSES AT $1.50 TO $2 PER DAY. 

Dr. Strong's, $2: Worden Hotel, $2; Balch House, 529 North 
Broadway, $1.50 to $2; Trim Cottage, 67 Phila St., $1.50 ; Mrs. Sco- 
ville, 59 Phila St., $1.50. 



FEATURES OF THE SARATOGA PROGRAMME. 

The sermon by Rev. Dr. Noble, of Chicago, on Tuesday evening j 
the address by President Seelye, of Amherst College, on Wednesday 
morning ; the Woman's Home Missionary Meeting on Wednesday after- 
noon ; the report of the Committee on Evangelization on Wednesday 
evening, with addresses by Dr. Lyman Abbott, Dr. Josiah Strong, Dr. 
J. G. Johnson and Dr. Geo. F. Pentecost ; addresses on Thursday morn- 
ing, in behalf of the American Congregational Union, by Dr. L. H. 
Cobb, Dr. J. G. Roberts, and the Rev. Wm. G. Puddef oot ; other ad- 
dresses may be expected from Rev. J. E. Rankin, D.D., of New Jersey; 
Rev.Wm. Elliot Griffis, D.D., of Mass.; Rev. J. G. Merrill,D.D, of Missouri; 
Rev. Willard Scott, of Nebraska ; Rev. Joshua Coit, of Massachusetts ; 
Rev. T. O. Douglass, of Iowa ; Rev. Geo. M. Sanborn, of Arkansas ; Rev. 
James Tompkins, of Illinois; S. B. Capen, Esq., of Massachusetts; 
Rev. H. D. Wiard, of Dakota ; Rev. Geo. A. Hood, of Wisconsin ; Rev. 
G. H. Atkinson, D.D., of Oregon; Rev. C M. Sanders, of Colorado; 
Rev. Harmon Bross, of the Black Hills ; Rev. H. A. Schauffler, of Ohio ; 
and other prominent laymen and clergymen from different parts of the 
country. 



44 THE HOME MISSIONARY. June, 

To oub Anonymous Correspondent. — You have sent us several un- 
signed communications, bringing serious but wholly groundless charges 
against a good and honored man. You seem to be sincere in your con- 
victions, but you are in error. Please send us your name that we may 
disabuse your mind 

" From first to last the story of home missionary work in our coun- 
try reads like a romance. It is full of surprises on nearly every page." 
— Exchange. 

The pastor of that brave little church at Cole Camp, Missouri, 
writes : " Cannot some one be found who will help this struggling 
home missionary church to a second-hand communion service, and a 
bell, which can be bought for fifty dollars ?" 

Aim Higher! — "Do you take little bits," asks a Boston minister, 
" when you can't get big ones ? Please accept the inclosed, with the 
ardent wish it were as many thousands as it has units ! Aim higher 
next year. Strike for a million — nothing less ; and make the welkin 
ring until the last dollar of it comes into your open and waiting and 
wanting box ! The Lord bless and help and push on the great and 
good work! 

A Test Prayer. — "That thou mayest prosper and be in health even 
as thy soul prosper ethP Which of us would dare to pray for our 
beloved with such a stipulation? Should we not ourselves shrink from 
such prayer ? For if our financial gains had to be measured by our 
spiritual gains, which of us would not tremble for our solvency ? Yet 
St. John loved Gaius dearly, and did not hesitate to make the one, in 
his case, the condition of the other. — Prairie Pioneer. 

A Novel Contribution. — The house was neither lathed nor plas- 
tered. There was no carpet on the floor. A feeble fire in a broken- 
down cook-stove " took off the chill," as the members of the Ladies' 
Missionary Aid Society of Esmond, Dak., held an afternoon session 
with one of their members, and voted to send a contribution to the 
American Home Missionary Society " towards its next debt /" Would 
that such thoughtful consideration for a perplexed Parent existed 
throughout the whole country ! There would not only never be another 
debt to kill, but instead of the disastrous cry " Retreat" the brave 
workers at the front would be electrified by the glorious shout 
f s Advance!" 

Kansas Resolutions. — The Kansas City Congregational Club, at its 
last meeting, held in Paola, Kan., April 11th, voted $50 of the surplus 
funds on hand as a donation to the A. H. M. S., with the following 
communication to be sent by the Secretary: 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 45 

"Resolved, That we, appreciating the 'situation of the A. H. M. S.. 
apprehending the dangers and duties of the hour,' and looking forward 
with longing hope for the future, authorize and request the treasurer of 
the Club to send $50 of the funds on hand to the Secretaries in New 
York, with this answer to the inquiry of the Secretaries, ' How shall we 
keep out of debt ? ' That western men and churches give more to the 
support of this society." 

Church Bells. — Among the advertisements in this issue will be 
found that of the Cincinnati Bell Foundry Co. That company issues, 
free of charge, a catalogue, giving descriptions, prices, etc., of its bells 
(church, school and lire-alarm), with more than 1,800 testimonials from 
purchasers in every State and Territory of this country and Canada. 
Many of these are from ministers, who bear testimony to the good 
quality of the bells, and their low prices, bringing them within reach of 
comparatively feeble churches. Such churches, needing bells, may do 
well to write to the company, in Cincinnati, Ohio, for the catalogue. 

Co-operation, not Contention. — It was a happy thought of a home 
missionary pastor of a church in Michigan, to invite the pastors of 
other denominations in the place to unite with him in a " joint visita- 
tion" of the community. The three jiastors have recently started out 
on their visits, and thus far have met with cordial welcome. The fol- 
lowing card is presented at each houce, with notices of services in the 
different churches : 

" This joint card is handed you by the Christian ministers, whose names ac- 
company it, in the hope that, if it is not already your habit, you may be induced 
to attend regularly the services of some place of worship in this village, and that 
the children of the households may have the opportunity of receiving regular re- 
ligious instruction in the Sunday-school." 

" We might," says this pastor, " destroy each other by contentions. 
Perhaps we can build each other up, and conquer the village for Christ, 
by going out as he sent the twelve." 

The Broadway Tabernacle Church, N. Y. — The home missionary 
zeal of this church does not in the least diminish with the passing 
years. Within twelve months, ending January 31st, 1887, the members 
of this church and congregation contributed in cash to this treasury 
about $8,001). In addition to this generous sum, the Tabernacle Ladies' 
Home Missionary Society sent out twenty-three trunks of clothing, 
books, household goods, and money, the cash valuation of which is $4,- 
434 14. Six of these trunks have gone to Kansas, five to Nebraska, two 
each to Florida, Dakota and California, one each to Wyoming, Colorado, 
Michigan, New York, Massachusetts, and one to the widow of a home 
missionary. 

When we lvtlect that beside? a generous supply of useful garments, 



46 THE HOME MISSIONARY. June, 

each trunk also contained a library of about twenty new books, selected 
by Dr. Taylor, and an envelope " for the minister's wife," inclosing the 
wherewithal to meet extra expenses, we do not wonder that the letters 
received in return are pathetic in their grateful appreciation of such 
aid. 

The Secretary says: "The reports of a society like this must always 
have more or less sameness in their character, but that is little to be 
regretted when, as in this case, it is the sameness of continual success. 
Much work has been done this year. Many friendships have been 
formed, and the meetings have been both pleasant and profitable, so 
that the upper room in which they are held has come to be associated 
in all our minds with some of the happiest experiences of our lives. 
Our pastor has been present at almost every meeting, and has, by his 
helpful words, largely contributed to the joy of our labors." 



NOKTH DAKOTA. 

BY REV. H. C. SIMMONS, SUPERINTENDENT. 

North Dakota sends greeting to The Home Missionary, with the 
assurance that her visits are always welcome, always inspiring. "We 
look over our great field and we think, " Surely our need is the 
greatest; some one must soon come to help ws." Then The Home Mis- 
sionary proves to us that our need is paralleled in every district. With 
an area in North Dakota nearly twice as great as Ohio — with one great 
transcontinental railway passing through from East to West — with 
another building toward the Pacific at the rate of two miles of iron 
per day which will reach Helena, Montana, by Christmas ; with rail- 
roads coming in from the South (extensions of the great trunk lines 
from Chicago), with new towns springing up and the old ones grow- 
ing, it is certainly no time for a halt to be called in home missionary 
work because of an empty treasury. Thank God for the good news 
that the debt is dead. May it never be resurrected ! 

I wish every reader of The Home Missionary could see some of 
the letters I am receiving in these days, asking for ministers. Some of 
our churches have had no preaching since the students left last 
September. Fields, too, where in some cases congregations of a 
hundred would gather. Other churches are being divided up by other 
denominations coming in where the people would gladly remain 
together if they could have a minister. 

I went to the seminaries a few weeks since and laid the call from 
North Dakota before the graduating classes and plead with men 
privately to hear our call ; but how few respond. Delicate women 
come to North Dakota and find our winters endurable and even bene- 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 47 

ficial to their health, but strong young men are afraid of our winters ! 
Where are the young men with Christian heroism ? We can assign a 
man a whole county for a parish, where he can have good congrega- 
tions and a good support. Here foundations are to be laid of one of the 
grandest States of the American Union; fields white for the harvest wait 
for the reaper. O where is the reaper? 

We have had some precious revival work the past winter, although the 
unusual severity of the weather has prevented as much of such 
work as would otherwise have been. Some of our churches are making 
gratifying advances toward self-support, and had it not been for the 
severe drouth in the western part of the Territory last year more 
churches would have come near to the line. One church that two 
years ago was without a house of worship, scattered, almost hope- 
less, has, within two years, built a beautiful house of woislnp, nearly 
trebled its membership, reduced its application for aid the last year 
three hundred dollars, and now comes a contribution for the American 
Home Missionary Society of $80. 

One of the burning questions in North Dakota is that of establish- 
ing a college. The need is imperative, the opportunity excellent, the 
faith of. our Home Missionaries strong. But, like all new communities, 
after doing our best — which is but little — who will help us? No doubt 
the Lord has some good brother or sister ready to become our bene- 
factor and co-worker. May the help soon appear. 

The Congregational Sunday-school and Publishing Society has taken 
'one of our best pastors, Kev. Mr. Ewing, from Plymouth Church, 
Fargo, and has made him a Sunday-school superintendent for North 
Dakota ; thu-s giving him back to us in increased interest in Sunday- 
school work, and a strong helper to all home missionary effort. May 
the readers of The Home Missionary pray for us and for our work. 



FEEDING THE "BOOMER."' 



X have spent the day listening to the privations of western life, and 
for the first time have fed the "boomer 1 '' to make a fire of hay — no 
wood, no coal — only hay. The " boomer" looks like a large sheet-iron 
boiler, double height. It is filled with hay and turned bottom up over 
the openings, which are made by removing the two front covers and 
the centerpiece. The hay is lighted at the bottom, and, as it burns 
up, the ashes fall down and fresh hay appears to burn. The packing 
of the hay prevents it falling down or burning too fast. The heat 
diffused warms a large room very nicely. Cooking of all kinds is easily 
done by this fire. Occasionally the flames get the upper hand, 
and, bursting out, sai the house on fire. " The " boomer " 
takes its name, I suppose, from the fact that the burning is 



43 THE HOME MISSIONARY. June, 

accompanied by a sort of roaring of the draft, which, when 
too strong, makes the boiler red hot all around. The "boomer" is a 
bonanza for Dakota, for when we are slmt in for a week or two, when 
no one ventures away from home, a hay-stack or straw-stack of flax- 
straw can be used to keep the family warm. — Rev. J. P. Dyas, Athol, 
Dak. 



SCATTERED GRAVES. 



You ask about my children. They are seven ; but a loving Father 
has seen fit to take five home. One we laid to rest on the burning 
shores of Guiana, two in one grave in England, one in Boston, and one 
in the Rocky Mountains. The last was returned to Him who loaned her 
to us, last May. She went to be with Jesus thirty-six hours before I 
could get home across the snowy range to see her. I had left her two 
weeks before in apparently good health. "It is well with the child." 
A little while of waiting, and we shall be a reunited family on the other 
side. But for love to the Blessed One who bids us "go," and who is 
with us as he promised to be, we could not continue this w r ork. 
Nevertheless for twenty-five years, in various lands, we have proved 
the truth of God's word, " Lo, I am with you always." — Rev. T. Marsh? 
Downs, Kan. 

A "SPRING-TIME" PARISH. 

BY REV. C M. SANDERS, SUPERINTENDENT, COLORADO. 

Daniel Webster in one of his masterly orations spoke of the young 
as " The spring-time of the people." 

There is here, in Colorado, lying at the base of the Rockies and 
under the shadow of Long's Peak, what might be well termed a spring- 
time parish — a parish composed mainly of young people. I wish that 
it were possible for me to sketch it, that those who read The Home 
Missionary might be aided in their realization of the great and broad 
work the American Home Missionary Society is doing, and that those 
who contribute to its support might see their contributions in action. 

Eaton — named for Governor Eaton — is situated in Northern Col- 
orado, eight miles north of Greeley, on the railroad leading from 
Denver to Cheyenne, Wyoming. A few buildings compose the vil- 
lage ; these comprise a mill for grinding wheat, an elevator, a store, a 
public-house, and a few residences. Among the most conspicuous 
buildings is a two-story brick school-house. Dotting the prairie around 
this hamlet, you observe a number of ranch-houses and buildings. 
Looking east, you see the vast rolling plains, stretching on and on, 
until they and the heavens embrace each other. On the north the view 
is much the same. On the west is the Rocky Range, with Long's Peak 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 40 

tallest of all, within this view. On the sonth is the far famed "cold 
water town," Greeley, a beautiful city, substantially built and greatly 
prospered. This whole region is a cultivated prairie. Eaton is a 
farming town. There are, in the township and about it, some 28,000 
acres brought under a water ditch. As yet no lots in the village arc 
for sale, but when these are put upon the market I bespeak for them a 
rapid sale. Did I wish to farm I know of no more desirable location. 
On these ranches, in the mill and in the store, you find people in 
the vigor of early manhood. Some of these young men have families,, 
and those not yet so blessed see good prospects in that line ahead and 
patiently bide their time. A good school is under successful operation, 
as yet small, of course. 

But these " spring-timers " were not satisfied with simply a school 
for the littler folks, they must have the Sabbath honored by public 
worship and the Sunday-school. The second floor of the school build- 
ing is so arranged as to be well suited for church purposes for a 
while. The pastors of Greeley very kindly gave them an occasional Sun- 
day afternoon service, but this did not meet the demands of the place ; so 
they consulted together and came to the conclusion that they must 
organize a Congregational church, and I was sent for to aid them in 
this. At their request I spent the first Sabbath in November with 
them, holding services Saturday evening and Sabbath morning and 
evening. On Sunday morning the church was organized with fourteen 
members. 

A month later a young minister by the name of King came to Eaton 
to visit a relative. He was invited to supply them a few Sabbaths. 
This proving satisfactory, and he, being well recommended by those 
who knew him, was asked to remain a year as their pastor and teacher. 
With the " week of prayer" came special meetings with glad results. 
On the 8th of February these spring-time folks called a council ask- 
ing to be recognized as a church and requesting the ordination of Mr* 
King should the council approve. The meeting of that council was 
an event for the place. But few of these young people had ever seen 
anything of the kind. It has put its impress into the history of that 
town ; neither will the pastors and friends composing the council soon 
forget this occasion. Rev. A. K. Packard, who has attended many 
councils during his long and useful life, in his address to the people, 
remarked : " This is an occasion of more than usual interest. We are 
here to ordain a young man to the Christian ministry, to recognize 
a new Congregational church. And this is one of a series of special 
revival meetings." Bev. J. B. Gregg, the moderator, offered the prayer; 
Bev. A. W. Williams, the new pastor at Cheyenne, preached an able 
sermon, taking for his text. Gal. i, 8. Bev. B. T. Cross gave the 
charge, and Bev. George Michael, of Greeley, the right hand. 



50 THE HOME MlSSIONAKY. Jun« 

Near the close of the meeting, which was pre-eminently a spiritua 
service, the question was asked, " How many here present have started 
out in the Christian life since the new year commenced ?" Nineteen 
arose. Six others arose with these, to indicate their purpose to walk 
with them in the way of life. It was a refreshing season surely. There 
were some two hundred young people present, which included nearly 
everybody in that neighborhood. One of the new converts paid the 
bill for the Council's supper. 

Brother King called my attention to an old gray-haired man in the 
crowd. Said he, " That man was in the congregation last Sabbath, and 
I was so pleased to see an old man here that I went to him immediately 
after service to thank him for coming. 

One of the young ladies became deeply interested in a friend — that 
he might become a Christian. When I was there the week before she 
told me of this friend and how he had been especially kind to her 
brother who had died very suddenly a little while before. She said : 
"I cannot talk to this friend about religion, what can I do?" 

" You pray for him ?" " Certainly, I do " 

"Suppose you write him a note?" "Would that be proper?" 

"Yes, under the circumstances." Now at the Council suj)per, this 
young lady, with others, waited upon us. No sooner was I seated at 
the table th n she came to me, to say, " Mr. S., that young man is 
converted ; but it was not my letter, it was the sermon of the evening 
following which brought him to Christ." " Nevertheless, I am glad 
that you wrote the letter," said I. 

The following Sabbath twenty-two of these "spring-timers" came, 
forward and stood around the young pastor and confessed Christ. It 
was a scene that must have given joy in heaven ; so, too, it was a golden 
day to this church and community. Governor Eaton spent that Sab- 
bath with his son, who is one of the trustees of the church, and attended 
both morning and evening services, expressing a warm interest in what 
he there had seen and heard. 

Said a Cheyenne gentleman who had given liberally to the building 
of a church edifice, "What returns am I to receive for the money I am 
investing in this enterprise ?" That was a pertinent question 
for him to ask. Every dollar put into a Christian church 
should prove a paying investment. The members of our churches, 
east as well as west, might dwell more than they do upon this 
thought, and with profit. This home missionary work should 
pay its dividends. Can there be any question as to the invest- 
ment which is to be made here in this " spring-time parish?" Before a 
dollar has been sent them there has been an ingathering of twenty- 
two people on the profession of their faith, with more to follow. Pos- 
sibly some one may remark, " Why does such a parish need any aid 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 51 

from the American Home Missionary Society?" I have this to say in 
reply : This company of young- men are really just starting out in life. 
They do not, as yet, own their ranches. Their cash capital is limited. 
They have contributed liberally for them, but as yet are not able to 
pay the full salary of their pastor. It i3 their purpose to "go alone" 
in two years, at least. Before many year;?, if I mistake not, they will 
not only support their own church, bat will most liberally aid other 
spring-time parishes. 

"That our sons may be as plants grown up in their youth ; that our 
daughters may be as corner-stones, polished after the similitude of a 
palace." "Happy is that people whose God is the Lord." 



NO, SIR! 

At one of my preaching stations, among 1,600 people, there are only 
two men of means. The entire community, with these two exceptions, 
is made up of laboring people. I had been preaching Christ to them 
for some months, and it seemed to me the time had come to have a 
church building. So, after prayer for divine wisdom and guidance, I 
called upon one of the two mill-owners, and told him my errand. " I 
cannot help you," said he. " The time has not come to build a church 
here." "When will the time arrive?" I asked. " I don't know," said 
he. "In one hundred years?" " Oh, in less time than that," he re- 
plied; and added, after a moment's reflection: "I should think the 
time might come in five years." '• Do you believe the Bible to be 
true?" I asked. "I suppose it is." " Do you believe in heaven, hell, 
and the judgment?" "I think I do." "Do you believe in the Lord 
Jesus Christ ?" The man hesitated a moment, and then replied : " I do 
not know whether I do or not." " Will you be responsible for all the 
people who die in their sins here, during the next five years?' 1 ' 1 "No, 
Sir!" he exclaimed. "Take your subscription book to the others, get 
what you can, and then bring it to me." I told him I could not go on 
without his name at the head of the list. He took the book, and said; 
"How much shall I put down?" I was about to say $300, but faith 
was given me at the instant to say $500. He immediately put it down, 
and afterwards increased it to $1,750. When I interviewed the second 
mill-owner, he said he was a Spiritualist, and didn't want a church 
there ; but eventually gave us twenty-five dollars' worth of lumber, then 
$400 in cash, and the finest lot in town for the building. Can any one 
doubi that the Spirit of God was at work on the hearts of these tw© 
men, in answer to prayer? May their eyes be fully opened to see the 
truth as it is in Jesus. — From the Front. 



52 THF HOME MISSIONARY. June, 

FOR HIS SAKE. 

" Onward !" — I arrived here yesterday afternoon, and have taken a 
rapid survey of the situation, so far as my work is concerned, and can- 
not say that it is at all flattering. I read discouragement in the faces 
of these church-members. They fear ultimate failure. But of one 
thing I am sure : God can turn retreat into advance, and defeat into 
victory! I will just put the right hand of all my power into the right 
hand of God's power, and go forward. Has he not said : " I will up- 
hold thee by the right hand of my righteousness"? It may be that God's 
purposes shall best be served by our defeat in this place. So let it be, 
if it be his will. But that message has not come to me yet, and with 
the help of our good Mother, the American Home Missionary Society, 
enabling me to give the gospel message to these people — and God's 
promise to bless his Word, why should there be a failure ? 

The Little Coffin without a Grave. — On one of the coldest days I 
was sent for to visit a home and preach a funeral sermon. I had to 
walk six miles in one of the coldest days I was ever out in. They asked 
me to accompany them to the burial. We had to go into the country. 
When we arrived, no preparation had been made for the burial. The 
weather was so awfully cold, what could we do ? There was the little 
coffin, and no grave to put it in, and we could find no one who would 
venture out in the cold to help. We built a large, rousing fire, and 
went to work ourselves, taking turns at digging and warming ourselves, 
till we completed the work, and the little one was laid away. How 
thankful we all felt in our home that night that God had spared us such 
an experience. 

Self- Sacrifice. — Of course, we share in home missionary privations. 
My wife has blistered her feet with the frost in our own house. We 
could only " ship-lap" and plaster it. We have sometimes been brought 
where the way would have seemed dark, if God had not taught us that 
he "will provide." If the good people of the East could know how r the 
people out here in this new country struggle for the necessities of life, 
they tcoiddnH wonder that so much help is needed to build churches and 
support missionaries. 

For example : One of our most active members lives w r ith his family 
in a sod house of two rooms, houses his animals in sod barns, and burns 
hay to cook by and keep his home warm. His land is mortgaged, and 
he has been obliged to borrow money, with chattel security, at three 
per cent, a month. In three years, he has lost two horses and several 
cows. He took stock to herd, and they escaped to the Indian Reserva- 
tion, and he has been fined $50. Now, his sheep are dying. Last night 
he lost six. And yet, to-day he has subscribed $15 to help support the 
minister. Very few are there here who have not met with great losses, , 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY 53 

yet they support the gospel to the extent of their ability, and many 
would say beyond that which could reasonably be expected of them. 
The crops for two years have been very poor. If we have poor crops 
this season, I fear many must give up entirely and lose everything. 
Certainly a minister cannot complain when he suffers with his people, 
who feel that they must have religious privileges, and are ready to make 
great sacrifices for them. 

We read the periodicals sent us, and then give them to families who 
hunger for religious papers, for which they once subscribed, but which 
cannot now be afforded. As w r e try to follow on where 
Christ leads in the battle against wickedness and irreligion, 
though sometimes it be in hard places, we are greatly en- 
couraged when we are made to know that hearts around the 
warm hearthstones of New England and sister States are remember- 
ing those at the front with kindly sympathy and prayer and efforts for 
Christ's work out here. We had a most toviching prayer-meeting this 
week, with Matt, vi, 33 — " Seek ye first," etc. — for our subject. It 
came right home to so many here. Questions were many, and prayers 
were very full of trust that our Father will do all things well for those 
who trust in him. 

Roughing It. — Just before I started here, my wife took the three 
youngest boys to visit her mother. I brought with me our two 
eldest boys and the household goods. There was not a house or room 
in town I could rent, so I put up a tent, and moved into that. Our 
Superintendent, after a visit here, sent me word that we could have 
$500 to build a parsonage. So we selected a lot, and began to build a 
barn ; but before the first day's work was completed, there came on a 
great snow-storm. When I went to bed that night my shoes and socks 
were both wet. Shortly after, the wind began to blow a gale from the 
northwest, and the w r eather suddenly turned very cold, and the snow 
fell faster. Before ten o'clock it blew so hard I was afraid it would 
blow my tent down. Our window blew out, and everything was covered 
with snow. If the tent should blow down, we would be left on the 
open prairie without shelter. I aroused the two boys, and we dressed 
ourselves. My shoes and socks were frozen hard, and everything was 
so covered with snow that I could not find another pair. I had no 
overshoes, and was compelled to wrap a towel around one foot and a 
shirt around the other. Thus we started, lantern in hand, for the hotel, 
two blocks away, northwest. After wandering about in the blinding 
snow for some time, we saw a light, and found we were at the last house 
in the southeast part of town. If we had passed that, we might have 
spent the night on the prairie. Were we the only ones who missed the 
way in that storm, I might have thought we were careless ; but a good 
Presbyterian friend landed in a saloon, and three men went to a number 



5± THE HOME MISSIONARY. June r 

of houses before they found the way home. One man started to go 
half a block, and came to the railroad track, half a mils away. We were 
so bewildered that I chose to sleep on the floor with two quilts, rather 
than go out into the storm again. The next morning, we went to the 
hotel, but could not afford to stay there at three dodars a day, so after 
the storm was over we went back to our tent iigain. In a few days we 
completed our barn, and moved into the loft — stove, beds, books, and 
all we needed to make us comfortable. In the mean time we built our 
little parsonage, and moved into that, where we now enjoy life as well 
as most people. The outlook here is encouraging. We have over 
subscribed to begin building a church in the spring. 



"FAITHFUL OVER A FEW THINGS." 

BY GEO. E. ALBRECHT, SUPERINTENDENT, GERMAN DEPARTMENT. 

How much heroic work is done in home missionary churches of 
which hardly any one, save the Master of all work is aware, will never 
be known here below. Many a pastor has toiled a lifetime with stead- 
fast devotion, too modest to let any one know of his hardships and 
struggles, and therefore often without help, and even without sympathy. 
Content to be faithful over the few things over which his Lord has 
placed him, he has been willing and glad to endure much hardship. 
The following is the history of one of these quiet workers, the pastor 
over one of our oldest German churches, as told to me by his faithful 
wife, without intending, however, that it should be told again. 

Graduating from the theological seminary in '68, at the urgent 
request of the pastor of the English-speaking church in the same city, 
our missionary, whom we will call Mr. F., came to the little church, to 
which he has ministered ever since. The reality of the situation was 
considerably below the description given. The few members that had 
been gathered were alienated by differences ; no Sunday-school, and 
the first Sunday five hearers. The building was nothing but a shell, 
burdened with a debt, on account of which a lawsuit was the first thing 
to claim the attention of the new pastor. An old rusty stove and a few 
loose benchea, painted yellow, comprised the furnishing ; no Bible, no 
hymn-books; in fact, nothing usually found in a church. Mr. F.'s wife 
had died during his course in the seminary, leaving him a beautiful lit- 
tle daughter three years old, on whose account his sister came over 
from Germany. She was an earnest Christian and aided her brother in 
every way possible. At first only very poor homes were open to them. 
In one of these small-pox entered. Mr. F. went to the stricken family 
and aided them both spiritually and by doing even the most menial 
services for them. His sister nursed the sick, and consequently was- 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 55 

stricken down by the dread disease ; for six weeks her only nurse was 
her brother. In the mean time the little daughter was cared for in a 
family, kind, but, oh, so rough! The child was frail, and had never 
before been separated from her father, always sleeping in his arms. 
Tbe change was too great, and cost the life of the little one. A lady 
who knew her, recently said that she had never seen so lovely a child ; 
she was so fair and beautiful she seemed not to belong to earth. As 
soon as the sister was able to travel she returned to Germany, and the 
brother was left almost penniless and nearly broken-hearted; every 
earthly joy was gone, and if it had not been for Christ he would have 
utterly despaired. 

Faithfully he worked on, with little human help and sympathy. 
The church and Sunday-school grew slowly, the Lord honored his Word. 
After a while God gave to this lonely toiler another companion, who 
took upon her gladly the burden of her husband's work and did him 
" good all the days of her life." Finally the debts on the church build- 
ing were paid, blinds were bought, Mr. F. painted the church with his 
own hands, and, wdth the assistance of a carpenter made the seats now 
in use. A friend in the East sent a small organ. By and by, but with- 
out any outside aid, a pulpit Bible, hymn-books, a stand, chairs, lamps, 
carpet and proper stoves were bought. 

Soon the church had to be moved. The grade of the street was 
changed, the hill on which the building stood had to be excavated. 
Friends aided to the amount of $185, but this did not suffice. So our 
home missionary pastor took it upon himself to excavate the hill, reserv- 
ing the money for the moving of the building. From a miner he learned 
enough of his trade to enable him successfully, as he hoped, to finish 
his task. But his ambition was beyond his physical strength and 
ability. The task proved too great and too difficult for him. He 
received severe injuries, ruining his hands, lacerating them in a most 
painful way. The most skilled doctors were not able to give permanent 
relief. At times so simple an effort as opening a door would cause the 
wounds to break open again. 

One day the son of an infidel German druggist, sick with consump- 
tion, sent, much against his father's wishes, for our pastor. Soon he 
died, rejoicing in a Savior's love. The father suggested a new treatment 
for the aching hands of our minister, and, under the blessing of God, 
it proved more successful. The church was moved, and neatly finished 
inside and outside. The Holy Spirit worked in the hearts of the people. 
The Sunday-school grew, so that now it has outgrown the building. 
The audiences likewise increased. The young ladies banded together 
to lay aside a nest- egg for a new building fund, and already they have 
nearly $500 in the bank. The new building must come in due time, 
for God will not leave such faithfulness unrewarded. Through all 



56 THE HOME MIS IONARY. Julie, 

these years our brother has declined to accept home missionary aid, 
always saying that there were more needy ones than he to whom his 
aid could go, yet his church has never been able to give him more than 
$300 salary, while he personally has earned the rest of his daily bread 
in other ways. Now he looks back over nearly twenty years of such 
work and sees not the angel form of his darling child ; not the hours of 
menial service in the sick rooms ; not the days of toil in carpentering, 
and painting, and blasting, and hewing rocks ; not the dark clouds that 
encompassed him during all these years ; but a church respected by 
every one in the city ; two hundred and hfty children and young people 
in Sunday-school, seventy-five to one hundred in the preaching-services, 
the blessing of God resting upon his work so that there is no more 
room in the present building to contain it, and he only says : " If only 
we had the money we have saved the Home Missionary Society in the 
last eleven years to use it for our church building"! 

Surely, Christian heroism is found not merely on the foreign field ; 
many a hero fights a harder battle in our home work, in the very heart 
•of our civilized land, than our beloved brethren across the waters. 
Whether this self-sacrificing sowing and toiling through these nineteen 
years shall spring up into a blessed fruitage of a larger and more in- 
fluential work than ever before is for our churches to say, in giving 
or in withholding from our missionary societies the means for aiding 
such work. 



CROOKED STICKS. 



" Lord, I can't make these sticks perfectly straight. I have lost all 
my strength. Send me to another field." But what is the answer of 
the Holy Spirit ! " You were not sent to that field to take every crook 
out of those sticks: you can't perfect human nature ; that is my work.'' 
Now there is something in every man — ministers included — that is a 
little gnarly. It is peculiar to the individual — a streak of the old Adam 
inwrought in his individuality. In one it is stubbornness, in another 
it is suspiciousness, in another reserve, in another a disposition to be 
critical or fault finding or censorious. By whatever name it may be 
known, it is in fact a little twist of depravity, and no human influence, 
no preacher can untwist it and straighten it out. It is a peculiar twist 
of self, inborn, inbred, inwrought. So when I discover what a man's 
peculiar twist is, I say, " The Lord only can take that out of him, and 
I won't touch it if I can help it." I tried my hand at this once on a 
good Scotch brother, and I will never try it again. He was a most 
uncompromising subject, and I am quite convinced that if I had had 
a little more charity for his peculiarities he would have been a very 
useful man. —Dr. Spinning. 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 57 

THE LOST BOOT. 

It was a cold day in midwinter ; one of the much-dreaded days of 
southeastern Ohio ; a day of wind and clouds and snow-squalls, and its 
dreariness was intensified by a chill in the atmosphere which penetrated 
to the very bones. The " natural man'' would have chosen a sheltered 
seat by the blazing fire upon the hearth, where he could indulge in the 
luxury of the last rare book provided by a thoughtful friend at the 
east. But duty called me "up and out"! Duty has no special ar- 
rangement with the " weather bureau." The Heavenly Master made no 
provision for atmospheric conditions when he said, " Go ye into all the 
world and preach the gospel to every creature," and if I am to appear 
at my preaching stations to-morrow, and give those waiting ones the 
blessed Word, I must start now. So the long rubber boots are drawn 
on, the bodj- prepared to resist exposure, a little extra clothing thrown 
into the " gripsack," for should there be an unexpected interest in the 
meetings they must be continued (the workers at the Front must 
" strike while the iron is hot"), one last look at the blazing fire, and 
then the reluctant beast is torn from his comfortable stall and saddled. 
This faithful animal had, without doubt, anticipated the happy expe- 
rience of the week before — when the swollen creeks and rivers, having 
overrun the roads, compelled his master to walk over the hills, in the 
soft ground, ten miles, preach at half-past ten, then on three miles 
further for the next service. The creeks and rivers were all up-boom- 
ing, and the rain came down in torrents not soon to be forgotten. 
Thank God ! I have had strength thus far to fight the weather and keep 
every appointment. 

A pair of leather boots, for use at the end of the journey, are tied 
to the gripsack, and these two important items of a traveler's outfit are 
thrown across the front of the saddle, where they balance each other. 
Had the legs of those boots been firmly tied together before attaching 
them to the gripsack you would have been spared this story. Being 
now. to all appearance, suitably equipped for a wrestle with the ele- 
ments, we start. Mud, mud, and no end of it ! Thick, heavy, half- 
frozen mud — red mud — the very color and quality of soil doubtless of 
which our father Adam was made. Ten miles of road, where every 
footprint of man and beast which sinks into the soil must be pulled out 
with an effort. 

I came at last to a wayside post-office, and, having letters to mail, I 
dismounted and found myself knee-deep in the mud. Just here I made 
an awkward discovery. One of those leather boots had, without a 
sound, parted company with its mate, which had an almost lifelike look 
of desolation as it hung dangling from the saddle — alone. Here was a 
dilemma ! A man can't preach comfortably in one boot — I must go 



58 THE HOME MISSIONARY. June, 

back and seek and save that lost boot. With a heavy heart on one side 
and a lighter one on the other, my four-footed companion and I retraced 
our muddy route. But the search was fruitless, and I mourned not 
only a lost boot, but a lost day. 

I sat down before the fire to warm my feet, which felt strangely 
numb ; the rubber boots were drawn off when a curious sight met my 
eyes. For the first time I looked upon a pair of swollen, stiff, death- 
white feet. The misery of the next few hours can better be imagined 
than described. After long and patient rubbing we were at last 
rewarded by the red glow which indicated a return of life to a pair of 
feet which had seemed to be in the embrace of death. 

The next morning, while preparing to start again, there came a 
brisk rap at the door, and while we wondered who wished to intrude 
upon our domestic, but rather interrupted, tranquility at that hour, in 
walked the deacon of one of my churches, bearing the lost boot, which 
a party of school children had rescued from its grave of mud the night 
before. This goes to prove that even the lambs of the flock were 
familiar with the boots of their shepherd! And so, ignoring trouble- 
some feet, howling elements, and miles of mud, your missionary set 
out once more. The weighty business of the King cannot be deferred. 
The watchman on the towers of Zion must be at his post. The conflict 
between heaven and hell is raging, and souls are deciding their destinies 
every day. He who was the greatest missionary the world ever saw 
has written to us that God "hath given to us the ministry of reconcilia- 
tion." We cannot delay the work, we must not halt, for "God in 
Christ is reconciling the world unto himself, and hath committed unto 
us the word of reconciliation.' 1 '' — A Missio?iary in Ohio. 



FROM HONG-KONG, CHINA. 



I have been greatly interested in the recent serial in your magazine, 
entitled " How I Became a Home Missionary." Those who have pe- 
rused this graphic story will remember that the writer refers to Hong- 
Kong as the scene of his conversion. But much has passed since 1864 ; 
the two missionaries who were in part instrumental in awakening his 
slumbering conscience, have both left for their native land, and others 
have entered into their work. The British soldier and sailor are still 
here, and the scenes described in that story are being enacted over and 
over again. There is the same persecution against those who earnestly 
strive to live Christian lives. They may not always be nicknamed 
"psalm-singers," but they bear other names, such as "wee wees," 
while their attitude in prayer is often characterized as "the knee drill." 
Some of the British men-of-war do not have even " six" praying sailors 
on board ; and occasionally when the few faithful ones are engaged in 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 59 

prayer their devotions are disturbed by the falling of something upon 
their heads, purposely dropped from above. "How many Christians 
are there on board your ship ?" I asked of a Christian sailor a few Sab- 
baths since. " Six," was his answer. But though few in number, they 
are strong in God, and during the week of prayer astonished some of 
the people of Hong-Kong by their religious zeal. In the social meet- 
ings that are held from week to week at some of the missionary ladies* 
houses, the sailors tell us how they have been brought from death unto 
life ; and then they urge their companions with all the fervor of their 
new-born love to come to Christ. When some thought they ought to 
have a little more singing, in order to make it more social, these quickly 
intercepted the song by a testimony or prayer. Many of them are not 
learned, but one thing is evident — that the power of the Almighty is 
with them, and that the Bible is their one theme. Said one missionary, 
who is a graduate of Princeton College, after attending a meeting 
where these same sailors prayed and sang : " I have never been in such 
a meeting since coming to China.'' 

Two have recently left the British army to take up the work of dis- 
tributing the Scriptures among the Chinese. One is now studying in 
America to become either a foreign or a home missionary, while others 
are talking of taking the same step. These are but droppings from the 
spiritual skies, yet they indicate how closely the foreign work is related 
to the home work, and vice versa. The number may be few who are 
thus willing to bear the reproach and ridicule of their fellows, and yet 
those who do have courage thus to confess Christ are pure gold, and 
the faith of these simple believing ones would do credit to many older 
saints. Said one of them not long since : " If I leave the British serv- 
ice, I shall have recourse to the bank of Heaven in order to prosecute 
the work that God shall give me to do." And he knows how that 
" bank" is worked. Blessed are they that can bear testimony to the 
same experience. 

But I meant only to tell you how many of our home missionaries 
become Christians through the influence of foreign missionaries, and 
how many go to the foreign field from the home land. Thus the two 
great missionary societies live and thrive only in the most vital union. 
Let home missionaries educate for the foreign field, and let not the 
foreign missionary neglect his kindred and friends in foreign lands, but 
let him give them the gospel as far as it lies in his power ; for the 
foreign resident in foreign lands affects Christian missions either for 
weal or woe, and if our coast ports contained none but earnest Christian 
foreign residents, the missionaries might leave for the more un evangel- 
ized heathen districts. But I have trespassed upon your time and pa- 
tience, and the only excuse I have for writing is, that I was once a Home 
Missionary, though now laboring in a foreign field. Old loves do not 



60 THE HOME MISSIONARY. June, 

soon die, and mine has not died for the good old American Home Mis- 
sionary Society, and my prayer to God is that she may have many more 
of those who are converted on heathen shores to enter her service. — 
Mev. C. M. Hager. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY 

SOCIETY. 

Home Missionary Wall Map $12 50 

Annual Report of the A. H. M. S 

Wind from the Holy Spirit, paper (portrait) .' 20 cents 

" " " " •• " (without portrait) 10 " 

'• " cloth (portrait) 45 " 

Our Country, paper 25 " 

clot!: 50 " ' 

Collection Envelopes, per hundred 25 " 

How I became a Home Missionary, per hundred; 50 " 

Origin and Work of the A. H. M. S., Rev. David B. Coe, D.D 50 " 

HOME MISSIONARY LEAFLETS. 

Per hundred. 

1. A Plea for Home Missions in Three Words, Rev. H. A. Stimson 35 cents. 

2. The Motive Power in Home Missions, Rev. James Brand 35 " 

S. Three Ways to increase Benevolent Contributions 35 " 

4. Woman's Department and the Churches 

5. Forms of Constitution for Woman's Societies ' ; 

6. Young People and Home Missions, Mrs. C. C. Creegan". 50 " 

7. Woman's Work in Home Missions, Rev. H. A. Stimson 25 

8. An Example worth Imitating, Mrs. C. L. Goodell 20 

9. Out of print. 

10. Somebody is Shirking, Samuel B. Capen 

11. Modern Migration of Nations, Rev. C. T. Collins 50 " 

"12. Women and the Financial Problem, Mrs. C. L. Blake 20 " 

13. Suggestions for forming Woman's Societies 

14. " " " Young Ladies' Circles " 

15. Work for Young Ladies' Circles 

16. Out of print. 

17. Mustard Seed and a Mountain, Mrs, Alice Eddy Curtiss 50 " 

18. Aunty Parsons's Story, Mrs Alice Eddy Curtiss 35 " 

19. A Dialogue on Home Missions, Mrs. C. A. Richardson 

20. " Clare's Part"; Story of a Home Missionary Box, Mrs. Alice Eddy 
Curtiss 50 " 

21. Out of print. 

22. Teaching Children to Give, Mrs. John L. Scudder 35 " 

23. Somebody is Shriveling, Samuel B. Capen 50 " 

24. For His Sake, Rev. S. J. Humphrey 35 " 

25. A Pull all together, Rev. Wm. Kincaid 20 " 

26. Sunday-school Concert Exercise, Mrs. Alice Eddy Curtiss 35 " 

27. Our Work among Foreigners 35 " 

28. Annual Report of the Woman's Department 35 " 

29. The Responsibility for Missionary Debts, Rev C. A. Northrup 20 " 

30. An Experiment in Systematic Giving 35 " 

31. Heaven-Sent, Miss Miriam B. Means 35 " 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



01 



rii hundred. 

32. Light out of Darkness 35 cents, 

33. Emergency Women, Eleanor Earnest 35 

34. A Little Brother and Sister, Mrs. Alice Eddy Curtiss 35 " 

35. Those After-dinner Coffee-spoons, Mrs. E. W. Noyes 35 

36. What the Deacon Said 20 " 



ROLL OF HONOR. 

Year ending April 1st. 1887. 

Sixty-three Churches have resolved to try and support themselves without 
further aid from the Society. The Pastors whose names are given were with 
the Churches at the time of attaining to self-support. 



Org. 

1881 
1870 
1882 



1878 

1877 

1865 

1872 

1839 ) 

1877) 

1871) 

1866 > 

1871 

1857 
1857 

1884 
1882 
1883 

1875 ) 
1871 f 
1869 
1879 

1871 

1882 

1880) 

1885 S 

1875 

1869 

1872 

1872 

1878 



Missouri. Self -support . 

.St. Louis (Hyde Park) Rev. Alfred K. Wray May 1, 1886 

.Meadville " E. C. W. Hill Nov.24, - 

.Kansas City (Clyde Ch.) " John H. Williams Jan. 1, 1887 

FLORIDA. 

.Jacksonville " Rev. Sullivan F. Gale.. .Aug. 1, 1886 

Texas. 

.Dallas Rev. Cyrus I. Scofield May 11. 1886 

Michigan. 

.Leslie Rev. William C. Allen June 10, 1886 

JohnWhalley Aug. 1, " 

George W. Jackman... Nov. 16. '• 



. Richmond 

. Grand ville and Hudsonville 



.Allendale and Eastmanville 
.Ovid 



Clarence Finster Dec . 1 . 

• Edward Hill Mch . 1 , 1887 

Minnesota. 

.Glencoe Rev. Arthur H. Tebbets Aug. 1, 1886 

.Wabasha " Newton T. Blakeslee. .. Dec. 1, " 

.Minneapolis (Union) " George A. Hood April 1, " 

" (ComoAve.) " Herbert W. Gleason... .Jan. 1,1887 

. St. Paul (Atlantic) " George R. Dickinson. . . Feb. 15, " 

Kansas. 
.Brookvihe and Bavaria Rev. Samuel G. Wright May 1, 1886 

.Ft. Scott " H. A. L. King April 1, 1887 

.Garden City " Homer Thrall " 1, " 

Nebraska. 

.Ashland Rev. William Leavitt April 1, 1886 

.MeCook 



.Sutton and Grafton. 



. Friend 

.Milford 

.Sutton (First Ch.). 

.Steele City 

. Springfield 



George Dungan May 15, 

Henry Bentz Sept. 1, 

Sidney Strong " 18, 

Samuel G. Lamb Oct. 1 , 

Ephraim H. Baker Nov.10, 

Edmund Cressman " 18, 

Edwin P. Dada Dec. 1, 



62 the home missionary. June, 

1872 . . .Kearney Rev. John Askin Jan. 1, 1887 

1884 ...Neligh " Alfred F. Marsh " 1, " 

1885 Bertrand " Charles H. Huestis April 1, " 

1875 Indianola " George E. Taylor " 1, " 

J^J I West Point and Wisner » George C. Hall " 1, " 

North Dakota. 

1886 Armenia " Rev. Frank W. Stevens Oct. 1 1886 

Colorado. 

1882 Red Cliff Rev. Jarvis C. Dennis April 1, 1886 

1879 Manitou " Charles H. Cook Nov. 1, " 

California. 

1885 Pasadena Rev. Arthur H. Smith May 1, 1886 

San Diego " Jas. H. Harwood, D.D.Mch. 1, 1887 

1869 . . . .San Buenaventura " Thomas D. Murphy. . . .April 1, '• 

1875 San Jose " Charles W. Hill " 1, " 

Washington Territory. 

1877 Colfax (Plymouth) Rev. Thomas W. Walters May 15, 1886 

1885 Pullman " James Davies Dec. 1. " 

AUXILIARY STATES. 

Maine. 

1743 Windham Rev. Robert J. Kyle June 1, 1886 

1844 . . .West Auburn " Samuel H. Woodrow. .Mar. 1, 1887 

New Hampshire. 

1772 Mason Rev. Hartford P. Leonard . .July 1, 1886 

Connecticut. 

1722 Tolland Rev. Charles N. Seymour. . .Jan. 1, 1887 

Massachusetts. 

1876 Linden Rev. Edmund S. Potter Jan. 1, 1887 

1881 Beachmont " Joseph P. Bixby April 1, " 

Vermont. 

1806 Ludlow Rev. Herman P. Fisher Mar. 1, 1887 

New York. 

1833 Oriskany Falls Rev. S. A. Worden April 1, 1887 

Illinois. 

1884 Villa Ridge Rev. John Gibson April 1, 1887 

Wisconsin. 

1885 Washburn Rev. Francis Wrigley Jan. 15, 1887 

Iowa. 
1867 Independence Rev. John F. Home April 1, 1886 

1886 Berwick " Charles E. Blodgett ... Oct. 1, " 

1870 I 

IftftO I ' " " -^^ man an d Newburg " George M. D. Sloeum. .Aug. 1. " 

1870 Cromwell " Robert W. Jamison. . . Nov. 1 . " 

1870 Anita " John M. Cummings. ...Dec. 1, " 

1872 Emmetsburg " Oliver P. Champlin. . . .Jan. 1, 1887 

1858 . . . .Polk City " Robert W. Hughes " 1, « 



1887. THK HOME MISSIONARY. 63 



WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT. 



Co-workers. — The wife and daughters of Rev. E. A. Adams, who has 
charge of the Bohemian work in Chicago, are his most helpful assist- 
ants. In fact, it has been said that " this work could not possibly go 
on without their help.'' As an inspiration to those housekeepers who 
cannot find time for the monthly missionary meeting, be it known that 
this busy missionary wife has also the care of a very large family. 

On Sunday morning, these helpful co-workers start for the chapel at 
half-past nine o'clock, returning at half-past four. They would go back 
in the evening if not forbidden by the husband and father, from con- 
siderations of their health. These parents are sometimes troubled with 
doubts as to the wisdom in permitting their young daughters to devote 
themselves so exclusively to this work ; but when they note how fully 
their hearts are in it, and how God has prepared them for it, they can 
only say: " He will care for them in doing it." After a family discus- 
sion one day concerning a very advantageous opening for their father 
upon another field, Mrs. A. remarked, to test these girls: "It would 
certainly be very much pieasanter for you, than to remain in this work." 
All, without a moment's hesitation, refused even to think of such a 
thing, saying, very decidedly : " But we prefer to be here." 

Boys' Mission Circles. — We note with pleasure an increase in the num- 
ber of applications for aid in organizing and interesting Boys' Mission Cir- 
cles. Our boys of to-day will be the men in active life, the men of money, 
influence and power ten years hence. On them we shall then depend for 
the means to carry on the home missionary work. Let us then take pains 
to make them intelligent in regard to the great evangelical needs of our 
country ; and while their hearts are tender, and their sympathies suscepti- 
ble, let us train them in ways of efficient helpfulness. We refer all 
who wish to do more than they are doing for the cause of Home Mis- 
sions to an article on " Boys' Home Mission Circles," in Tlie Ilrnte Mis- 
sionary for April, 1886, and we will send that number gratuitously to 
all who app]y for it to the American Home Missionary Society, Bible 
House, New York city. — II M. S. 

Maps for Missionary Meetings. — We have received a few applica- 
tions for a map illustrating our home missionary work. The A. H. M. S. 
has issued such a map of the whole country; pi'ice $12.50. But for 
increased intelligence in State work, maps of single States are called 
for. We suggest that our Woman's Home Missionary State Unions 
take this enterprize in hand, and either by special donation from some 
generous friend, or by general subscription, issue a large wall map, each 



64 THE HOME MISSIONARY. June, 

of its own State, having the destitute points in the State clearly indi- 
cated. Every Woman's Home Missionary Uuion should also have one 
of the maps of the whole country to loan to local societies. This would 
aid greatly in diffusing a comprehensive understanding of the extent 
and importance of the work of the national Society. — H. M. 8. 



FROM MISSIONARY WIVES IN DAKOTA. 

Your dear letter of sympathy has been received, with surprise, 
gratitude, and tears. We can hardly realize that we have friends who 
take so much interest in us. May God bless and richly reward his 
servants, and give them great joy and peace for their noble efforts in 
our behalf. God grant that all prayers offered for this new and difficult 
field may avail much. — Mrs. C. M. Daley, Willow Lake, Dak. 

It is wonderful how our Father has cared for us thus far step by 
step. Why do we ever grow faint-hearted, and wonder where our daily 
bread or raiment is coming from? . . . After the service yesterday, 
in a depot two miles away from home, we had a sort of inquiry meeting. 
Every seat was filled. One hard-working woman walked two miles, and 
brought three children with her, leaving as many more at home. I 
asked her if she prayed with her dear little family now. She said : " Oh, 
yes; every day." What a joy to gather such fruit! Several of these 
people asked for prayers. There are many souls in this lonely spot 
that ought to be cared for. After meeting we rode home in the old 
rickety wagon, on a seat without a back, but there was a strong arm 
about me all the way, and I was safe. At family worship this morning 
we prayed that we might be uniting to leave undone the work we can- 
not do. But we asked even more earnestly that the dear Lord will re- 
plenish the home missionary treasury, and send more laborers into the 
field. — Mrs. C. Seccombe, Springfield, Dak. 

We have been having two days of rain accompanied with strong 
winds. This weather commenced Sunday night. I was so tired, and 
slept so heavily, I didn't hear it until Mr. D. spoke to me. Then we 
had to run with pails and boards, for it came pouring into the windows 
and down the steps into the rooms ; for you may remember that we live 
under the church. I soon dispatched Mr. D. for an augur, and we 
bored holes to let the water through into the ground. It is a damp 
time for us just now, but I keep a good fire, and dry out as well as I 
can, and long for a house above ground. 

To-day I called at a board shanty three miles out, where one of our 
flock lives. The shanty is ten by twelve feet, and there are three chil- 
dren in the family. The husband was in the field, and the wife piling 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 65 

up sods about the place to keep the wind and water out. They are ex- 
cellent Christian people, and oh! how they do enjoy the reading matter 
which we can give them, thanks to the dear people who are sending it 
to ns. There is nothing more helpful than the papers thus sent. We 
received four new members into our church yesterday from the Sunday- 
school. I gave them the right hand of fellowship for the church. Our 
Ladies' Society met as usual last week, and we had a full attendance, 
although the rain was pouring down after the Dakota fashion. 

We have had a heart-rending cry for a Sunday-school and preaching 
in a destitute, depraved neighborhood sixteen miles away. One man 
has offered Mr. D. iifteen dollars a year if he will go. This man lives 
in a barn of a house, not plastered ; the cracks are large enough to put 
your hand through. We have found a brother to superintend 
the Sunday-school, but what shall Ave do about the preaching? Would 
that we might multiply ourselves twenty times. Oh, for men and 
means ! May God open the hearts and purses of his people to save our 
country. 

We have a cordon of Sunday-schools clear around our field, and we 
bless God for the papers and periodicals that are sent to us. I wish 
you would ask individuals to put their names on the outside of the 
packages that we may know whom to thank. 

Thanks to Secretary Coit, of Boston, and the Norwood Y. P. S. C. E., 
and a boy's class in Springfield, Mass., and The Home Missionary, our 
Fanny has a barn ! It is dry, too ! I tell Mr. Drake I think we had 
better move into it. What a miserable old shed she did have ! and it 
was so hard for Mr. D. to harness and' unharness out of doors, and 
pull his hay out of a snow-drift. AVe are thankful to see signs 
of warm weather. It has been a hard winter. Our rooms 
were so cold we couldn't begin to keep warm, even with a 
fire, except when in bed. It has been a little tongh, sometimes, 
to come home from our long rides and have to build a fire, and wait for 
it to get warm. There ! now I'll stop, and warm my fingers, and praise 
God for our blessings. — Mrs. A. J. Drake, Iroquois, Dak. 



ROGERS ACADEMY, ARKANSAS. 

We are having a very encouraging year. There are twice as many 
large pupils as last year. Nine school-teachers are attending. One 
walks four miles to school and back every day. Several walk from two 
to three miles. The eagerness to learn is phenomenal. I never saw 
anything like it before. Our greatest need now is a finished building. 
We have space for ten rooms on the third floor, but no means to finish 



66 THE HOME MISSIONARY. Julie, 

them. We could fill them at once with the very best of students. As 
it is, the influence of the Academy is limited more by lack of facilities 
for board than all other causes combined. Thirty-five dollars will finish 
one room. Is there not a Society of young people who would like to 
finish one room, and name it? . . . Another great need : a cabinet 
organ. — Rev. J. W. Scroggs, Principal. 



A GRATEFUL LETTER. 



From a German Missionary. — Please allow us to return our sincere 
thanks for the precious news communicated in your letter that we are 
to have a box. No such cheering voice have we heard throughout the 
year, while we have been fighting against Satan, the world, and our 
own inherent weaknesses, of which the material question, "What shall 
we eat and wherewithal shall we be clothed?" is not the least. This 
has often endangered our personal fearlessness in combating the evils 
around us by keeping us wrapped up too much in temporal cares. But 
now our hearts are full of joy, and we look confidently toward the 
future, and are ready to see, and to have others see, nothing but Jesus. 
We know from experience the Christ-like spirit that prompts the givers 
of these consecrated boxes. They have been unto us like the ravens 
that fed Elijah, and without their angel-like mission to us, we should 
have lost, not our calling and election, but the inspiration to make unto 
others their calling and election sure. Please accept the assurance that 
your gift is appreciated more than words can express. Not sinful 
pride will be the result of receiving your generous donation, and put- 
ting it to use, but the deepening of faith and the humiliating conviction 
that Christ still has his messengers of love, while we thought that no 
one cared for the self-denial and the taking up of the daily cross which 
his work demands. We are eagerly expecting the box, even counting 
the days. Is it sinful to be so impatient? If you could know how 
happy your letter makes us, you would be exceedingly joyful 

Later. — We were immensely delighted with your generous donation. 
This box has once again saved us from bitter wants; and the 
satisfied countenances of my good wife and children betray the inner 
feelings of us alh and many a prayer of gratitude finds its expression in 
appreciation of your bountiful hearts and rich gifts. Every article in 
the box has not only been greatly needed, but will be put to appropri- 
ate use. The overcoat and brown dress and other articles of clothing 
are so beautiful and luxurious, that we are almost under the impression 
that you think nothing too good or too valuable for Christ's poor 
markers. Surely He will reward you. — Missouri. 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 67 

OUR YOUNG PEOPLE. 



LETTER NO. 9. 



My Dear Young Friends : — Somebody said to your venerable cor- 
respondent the other day, " Look here ! anybody can ask questions. It is 
easy enough to sit in your den, and with a few strokes of the pen create 
a raid among the children upon all the encyclopaedias, histories, much- 
enduring parents and pastors in the land — but what do you know about 
John Huss?" Such a challenge could not, of course, be ignored ; and al- 
though many of you have gleaned with commendable skill and care, my old 
eyes have also taken a peep into that strange far-away time, to see if by 
any chance an additional scrap of interest concerning this remarkable 
man might be picked up by an after-gleaner — and I find this. 

When John Huss was led to the stake to be burned for his love and 
loyalty to Christ, his enemies placed upon his head a paper crown, 
illustrated with painted devils. When he saw it he said, " My Lord 
Jesus Christ for my sake wore a crown of thorns. Why should I not 
then, for his sake, wear this light crown. Truly I will do it, and that 
willingly." When it was set upon his head they said, ''Now we commit 
thy soul to the devil " " But I," said Huss, lifting his eyes toward 
heaven, "do commit my spirit into thy hands, O Lord Jesus Christ! 
To thee I commend my spirit which thou hast redeemed." And so 
through the flames he went to be forever with his Lord. 

Why have we lingered so long in our questions upon John Huss 
and the Bohemiams ? Simply this : " Five hundred years ago Bohemian 
students used to go to England to learn about the Bible and teach it 
to their people Now thousands of Bohemians come to our country to 
find a home. It is our happy duty to give them teachers and Bibles, 
and help them get back that true gospel which was taken away from 
them through long years of agony and blood. 1 ' This you are now help- 
ing to do through your Bohemian Fund. 

The wife of Rev. Mr. Adams of Chicago, has meetings with the 
Bohemian boys in Chicago. Last week a boy fifteen years old asked 
her to lend him a Bible, saying he had never seen one ! Think of that, 
children, in our own country ! " How long may I keep it ?" said he. 
" How long do you want it ?" asked Mrs. Adams. " Until I have read 
it through,' 1 the boy replied. This lady has promised a Bible to each 
Bohemian child in the Sunday-school who will recite perfectly the Ten 
Commandments, the Beatitudes, and the 23d, 51st, and 95th Psalms, 
either in Bohemian or English. 

Now for a few "odds and ends." The "Mt. Hermon Band of 
Boys," at Ware, Mass., have prepared a bright red card, containing 



68 THE HOME MISSIONARY. JlUie, 

just five words in two lines. u Mt. Hermon Band — Honorary Member." 
Whoever pays twenty-five cents for one of these tickets becomes an 
honorary member of the Band. This wise little plan has already put 
into their treasury nine dollars. 

A Sunday-school class of boys in Harwinton, Conn., have formed 
themselves into a " Try in Earnest Club." Their teacher is a young- 
lady, and they meet at her home once in two weeks. They raised $8.25 
for the debt of this society. 

The " Willing Workers, 1 ' Mt. Vernon, Ohio, take your friend, The 
Home Missionary, to their little meetings, and spend some of the time 
looking up the answers to the " questions" and reading your letters 
and mine aloud. 

At Harrison, Mich., the young people gather up all the books which 
can be spared from their homes, and send them west to Sunday-schools 
which have no libraries. They have supplied two Sunday-schools since 
Christmas. The writer says, "We feel richer and happier for doing 
this. Will not others share our enjoyment?" 

We are glad to welcome to our Circle " The Lamplighters," of Hast- 
ings, Nebraska. They have been busy with their needles and their 
songs, and send us ten dollars for the good work. 

And here comes California — who begs to add to our list of nation- 
alities (answer 8) the following : " All to be found in California — Finns, 
Copts, Armenians, Society Islanders, Natives of New Brunswick and 
Nova Scotia, Hindoos, Javanese, Peruvians, Chilians aud Colombians." 
Who are the " Colombians"? 

One of our Circle in Missouri, who was late with her answers to the 
questions, says that her mamma calls her " Miss Put-offer" ! We will 
hope that in time she may change her name to " Miss Prompt." 

My dear girls and boys, will each one of you who kindly writes me 
a letter please remember to give me your full address f This means, 
your full name, street and number, town and State. I want to answer 
some very pleasant letters, but do not know where to find the writers. 
— Always your friend, The Home Missionary. 



QUESTIONS. 

21. What is the name of that good Christian Bohemian who preached 
the gospel of Jesus Christ to the people in 1403? 

22. Who will tell us something about him? 

23. How long were the followers of this good man persecuted on 
account of their religious belief? 

24. What King released them from this persecution? 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 69 

25. AVhat is the crest of the Prince of Wales } and where did England 
get that crest ? 

26. What connection has Queen Victoria with the Bohemian s .' 

27. How many Bohemians and Poles are there in this country who 
need the gospel, and how many missionaries are preaching it to them 
under Superintendent Schauffler's care? 

28. How many Germans are there in this country who need the 
gospel, and how many missionaries are preaching it to them under 
Superintendent Albrecht's rare? 

29. How many Scandinavians are there in this country who need the 
gospel, and how many missionaries are preaching it to them under 
Superintendent Montgomery's care ? 

30. Why are there so many people in this country who never hear 
the gospe] preached? 



BANNER STATE THIS MONTH. 

In Contributions — of Home Missionary States, Dakota ; of Aux- 
iliary States, Connecticut. 

In Answers to Questions and Letters — Michigan. 
In Home Mission Circles — Ohio. 



ANSW T ERS TO QUESTIONS 21 AND 22. 

From Missouri. — John Huss was born 1373. His parents be- 
stowed a great deal of care on his education. The word Huss means 
goose. He derived his name from his native village, Hussinitz. That 
was the custom of the age. His father died in his boyhood and his 
mother was very poor. It is supposed that he was helped through the 
University of Prague by Nicholas, the nobleman of the place. He be- 
came priest, and preacher in 1400. He read Wickliffe's books and be- 
lieved them, and preached to the people that they should read the 
Bible ; so he was called " a stiff-necked heretic"; but he did not care, 
and kept on preaching till they put him in prison. July 6th, 1415, he 
was burned in Constance, Switzerland. His clothes and his books were 
all burned.— Ella E. S. 

"ohn Huss, was born at Hussinetz about 1373, and burned July 6th, 
1415, at Constance. In 1398 he began to give lectures in theology. In 

1401 he became president of the faculty of Prague university, and in 

1402 was installed a minister. He published a treatise about the pil- 
grimages to Wilsnack. He preached against the clergy and demanded 
the despoiling of all useless things in the Church so as to give to the 



70 THE HOME MISSIONARY. June, 

poor. This excited strong- opposition. In 1409 when Sbuike the arch- 
bishop burned 200 volumes of Wycliffe, Huss strongly objected to it, and 
in consequence a commission of doctors condemned the bishop. The 
«ry of heresy was now raised against Huss. He was condemned as a 
heretic and ordered to quit Prague. He left the city but kept writing 
books. An outbreak followed in the city, so Huss returned because his 
followers were victorious. At this time he wrote tracts and published 
treatises which did a good deal of good. In 1414 he preached to great 
crowds at Prague. In the same year a council was called and Huss 
cited to appear before it. The Emperor granted him a safe conduct, so 
he went to Rome where he was fraternally received by the Pope. But 
on November 28th he was arrested and imprisoned, and a few days after 
he was transferred to an island in a lake. An accusation had been drawn 
up, and the commissioners were appointed to visit him and ask questions 
and copy answers. Huss asked, but was not allowed to have the assist- 
ance of a counsel. After a while he was transferred to the castle of Got- 
leben heavily chained. He was brought before a council four times. 
His books were burned as heretical. After the fourth council on July 
6th. 1415, he was led forth to an open field and burned. The ashes were 
thrown into the Rhine and all marks obliterated. He was the greatest 
of early Bohemian reformers. — Frank C. II — Massachusetts. 

Eddie K. — New Hampshire, gives us similar information concerning 
this persecuted man, and adds that he preached at the Bethlehem 
Chapel, at Prague. Our friend, Rev. Mr. Schaufner, calls his chapel 
for the Bohemians in Cleveland ''Bethlehem Chapel," and now we know 
why. Eddie goes on to say, "John Huss was a pure, spiritual man, 
and because he preached so earnestly against the vice, falsehood and 
abuse in the church, he was burnt at the stake, and his ashes strewn 
on the Rhine.'' 



M-I-C-H-I-L-I-M-A-C-I-N-A-C. 



We hear a great deal about "faith," and children often think of it 
as some great and wonderful thing which they cannot be expected to 
understand. Perhaps not, but I always think children show a great 
deal of faith when they put their money into a box or into the teacher's 
hand, to be taken away, out of their sight. They believe that it will 
go far away and help some poor child to learn to read and understand 
and know about the God and Father who gives us faith, and who helps 
us when we believe. 

A long while ago there were two children who learned to have a 
sort of faith. It was in the days when the part of this country which 
belonged to us was very small and the rest belonged to the Indians. 
Now we have taken it away from them. We had, in Boston, a company 
®f men who sent out missionaries in our own country. 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 71 

The name of one place where the missionaries went to teach the 
Indians you will find at the top of this writing. They did not use all 
that long word, but called it Mackinaw, and I dare say you will find it 
now on your maps. These teachers gathered a school of girls and 
boys and taught them to read and write in our language, for there were 
no books in their own. They frequently gave these Indian children 
names, because their own were often as hard to spell and pronounce as 

M-I-C-H- I-L-I-M-A-C-I-N-A-C. 

This boy and girl were told by their father that if they would go 
without sugar he would give them the money to educate an Indian boy 
and girl at Michilimacinac. Of course these two children did not 
drink tea or coffee ; they knew better — or their parents did — but they 
gave up the sugar, even in their milk and water and in other ways. 
Then they named the Indian boy and girl, and heard that then - educa- 
tion had begun ; and they had faith — that is they believed about it. 
They heard about them from time to time, and sent the money every 
year. Well, those Indian children grew up, and the boy became a good 
man and a teacher among his people ; the young woman also became a 
Christian, and married a good man, who was already teaching among 
them. 

One day, not so very long ago, somebody found an old letter from 
her, in which she told about herself and thanked the friends who had 
helped her when she was a child. She said she was still working for 
her people. When we enter the Lord's service we enter for life, and 
our work can only end with our life. — Esther. 



MISSIONARY BOXES. 



For many years the ladies of our churches have helped this Society and cheered the 
homes of its missionaries with boxes of clothing and other useful articles. The continuance 
of these favors is earnestly solicited. To secure satisfactory preparation and just distribu- 
tion, attention is invited to the following suggestions. 

1. Apply to the Secretaries to designate a family Deeding such assistance, and state, 
if practicable, how soon a box will probaoly be sent. 

2. If a family is selected without applying to the Secretaries, notify them without delay 
so as to guard against a duplicatioD of gifts. 

3. It several months should elapse before the box is ready to be sent, ascertain from the 
Secretaries whether the missionary's address remains as previously given. 

4. Mark the box plainly and indelibly, fasten it securely, and forward it to the missionary, 
not by express, but by a Forwarding Company, if practicable ; otherwise, as "fast freight," 
by railroad, taking two receipts from the Company. 

5. Write to the missionary, inclosing one of these receipts, a list of the articles sent in 
the box, and the money, $ 2, f 3, or $4, according to weight and distance, for the payment of 
freight <tf it cannot be prepaid). Mention, also, the name of the person to whom a letter 
of acknowledgment should be addressed. 

6. Keport to the Secretaries the forwarding of the box, its estimated value, and the 
amount sent for freight, in order that the donation may be acknowledged in The Home 
Missionary. 

7. If a box has been prepared, not for a specified family, but to be assigned by the 
Secretaries, put into it a list of its contents, the name of the association or individual from 
whom it comes, and the address of the person to whom the missionary may send his letter of 
acknowled^im-nt. 

8. Mark the box, "American Home Missionary Society, Bible House, Astor Place, New 
York," adding the name of the place from which it comes. 



72 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



Jim* 



9. Write to the Secretaries, inclosing moneyfor freight, and stating the time when and 
the line by which the box was sent, its estimated value, and giving a list of contents to guide 
in the assignment of the box. Be careful to state the size of each adult, and the age and 
sex of each child for whom the clothing is intended, as boxes are not opened at the office. 

10. These donations are not deducted from th? grants of the Society. It needs the same 
amount of money, therefore, in order to fulfill its stipulations with its missionaries, as if no 
such gifts were provided ; and we trust the friends of Home Missions will not withhold or 
diminish their contributions of money in consequence of their giving other things that are 
needful. 



WOMAN'S STATE H. M. ORGANIZATIONS. 



New Hampshire Female Cent Institution, org. 

1805, Miss Annie A. McFarland, Concord, Sec. 
MinnesotaWoman's Home MissionarySociety, org. 

1S72, Mrs. H. L. Chase, Minneapolis. Sec. 
Nebraska Woman's Home Miss. Association, org. 

Oct., 1874, Mrs. E. H. Baker, Sutton, Sec. 
Maine, Woman's Missionary Auxiliary, org. June, 

1880, Mrs. Levi L. Paine, Bangor, Sec. 
Michigan, Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. May, 1SS1, Mrs. Mary B. Green, Olivet, 

Sec. 
Kansas, Woman's Home Missionary Society, org. 

Oct., 1881. Mrs. Addison Blanchard, Topeka, 

Sec. 
Ohio, Woman's Home Missionary Union org. 

May. 1SS2, Mrs. Flora K. Regal, Oberlin. Sec. 
New York, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Oct., 18S3, Mrs C. C. Creegan, Syracuse 

Sec. 



Wisconsin, Woman's Home Missionary Society. 

org. Oct., 1S83, Mrs. C. Matter, Brodhead, Sec. 
North Dakota, Woman's Home Missionary Soci- 
ety, org. Nov., 1S83, Miss S. E. Judd, Fargo, 

Sec. 
South Dakota. Woman's Home Missionary Onion, 

org. Sept., 1SS4. Mrs. W. H. Thrall, Armour, 

Sec. 
Connecticut, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org.Jan.,1885, Mrs. S. M. Hot.chkiss, Hartford, 

Sec. 
Missouri, Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. May, 1885, Mrs. E. P. Bronson, 3100 

Chestnut St., St. Louis, Sec. 
Illinois, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

May, 18S5, Mrs. C. H. Taintor, Chicago, Sec. 
Iowa, The Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

Org. June, 1S86, Miss Ella Marsh, Grinnell, Sec. 



WOMAN'S FUND FOR FOREIGN WORK. 

Previously acknowledged $4,150 51 

Connecticut, Fan-held, $47; Farmington, $2 ; Lakeville, $44.33; Middieton, $25; New Ha- 
ven, $11; Putnam, $1 ; Salisbury, $43.88 ; Suffield, $2.75 176 96 

Dakota, Lake Henry 6 00 

Illinois, Rockf ord 57 11 

Maine, Bucksport, $20 ; Castine, $4; Dennysville, $10; Portland, $20.30; South Paris, $8.25. 62 55 

Missouri, W. H. M. 8 46 23 

New Hampshire, Atkinson, $59; Tamworth, $30 SO 00 

New York, Albany, $30; Binghamton, $5U; Brier Hill, $25; Brooklyn, $85; Fairport. $77; 
Hammondsville, $5; Harford. $9 ; Homer, $97; Ironville, $S.30; Madrid, $lo ; New Y'ork, 
$5; Oswego Falls, $5 ; Poughkeepsie, $25 ; Perry Center, $25; Riverhead, $25; Sherburne 

$35; Schenectady, $10, Warsaw, $22.50 ; West Groton, $10 558 80 

Vermont. Carletoh, $10 ; Derby Line, $5 ; Dorset, $25 ; East Corinth, $50 ; Manchester, $50 ; 
South Royalton, $25 ; Springfield, $100 ; St. Joansbury, $281 536 00 

$5,674 16 



CHILDREN'S BOHEMIAN FUND. 

Previously acknowledged $1,456 36 

Connecticut, Clinton, $9.04 ; Lakeville, $5 ; Norwalk, $1 15 04 

Dakota, Lake Preston, $11; Vermilion, $5 16 On 

Illinois, Rockford 29 10 

Massachusetts, Braintree, $10 ; Leominster, $6.30 16 30 

Michigan, Cheboygan, $1.50; Kalamazoo, $2 3 50 

Minnesota, St. Cloud 5 00 

$1,541 30 



HOME MISSION CIRCLES. 



[The following Circles have answered the three questions in the "Special Notice" in the 
March Home Missionary.] 

Connecticut.— "Morris Cove Mission Circle," org. 1SS7. Miss Edith R. Chidsey, New Haven, 



Sec. 



Sec, 



Massachusetts.—" Young Peoples' Mission Circle," org. 1S55. Archie B. Irwin, Gilbertville, 

" Home Mission Band," org. 1854. Mrs. Lydia N. Ferry, East Hampton, Sec. 
•■ .Mi. Hermon Band or'Boys," org. 1837. Mrs. Geo. H. Coney, Ware, Sec. 
"Young Men's Missionary Association," org. 1886. Arthur H. Jameson, Amherst, Sec. 
'« Girls' Mission Band," org. 1887. Mrs. G. C. Hall, Ware, Sec. 
" Boys' Mission Band," org. 1887. Mrs. G. C. Hall, Ware, Sec. 

Michigan.—" Boys' Mission Circle," org. 1887. Miss Annie E. Jeffers, Kalamazoo, Sec. 
Minnesota.—" Willing Workers," org. 1S85. Mrs. C. T. Norton, Northfleld, Sec. 
New Hampshire.— "The Lois Jewett Helpers," org. 1S84. Miss Jennie R.Sanborn, Webster, 
c. 
" Light Bearers," org. 13S7. Mrs. C. K. Bancroft, Concord, Sec. 
Nebraska.—" The Lamplighters," org. 1SS6. Mrs. William Walters, Hastings, Sec. 
Ohio.— " Willing Workers," org. 18S6. Miss Bertie Kowe, Mt. Vernon, Sec. 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



73 



APPOINTMENTS IN APRIL, 1887. 



Sot in commission last year. 

Clayton, Thomas, Zanesville, Ohio. 

Curry, David, Staudish, Mich. 

Curry, Erastus S., Thayer and Curry, Mo. 

Chrlstofferson, G. E., Clinton, Iowa. 

Davies, David E., Curtis, Freeman's Mill, Mt. 
PiSgan, Hearts Chapel and Smithton, Ark. 

Dyas, J. P., Athol and Frankfort, So. Dak. 

Hall, Luke, Kalamo, Carmel and two out-stations, 
Mich. 

Hibbard, Augustine G., Haunibal, Mo. 

Lundquist, Carl J., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Meacham, G. M., Denver, Colo. 

Merrill, Miss S. R., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Parker, llance H., Big Kapids, Mich. 

Penniman, Alfred B., Omaha, Neb. 

Peterson, Mathlas, Clear Lake and eight out- 
stations. No. Wis. 

Shannon, William H., Maple Rapids and East 
Fulton, Mich. 

Small, Henry E., Stafford and Plevna, Kan. 

Re-commissioned. 

Barber, Leman N., Lincoln and four out-stations, 

Cal. 
Brown. George H., McAllister, Beaver, Savanna 

and vicinity, Ind. Ter. 
Bruechert. F. H. W., Omaha, Neb. 
Bugbey, William S., Cheboygan, Mich. 
Burgess, Richard M., Alba and Simons, Mich. 
Campbell, James, Olympia, Kamilchie and five 

out-stations, Wash. Ter. 
Carter, Elijah, Sherburne and Triumph, Minn. 
Chappell, George H., Brownton, Minn. 
Cheadle, Stephen H. East Tacoma, Wash. Ter. 
Chester, Arthur, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Cochran, Albert B., Bangor, Mich. 
Countryman, Asa., Las Vegas, New Mex. 
Cressman, Edmund, Aurora, Neb. 
Dean, Samuel C, South Bend, Neb. 
Dickinson, William G., Webster, So. Dak. 
Dimon, Jacob V., Wymore, Neb. 
Drake, Andrew J., Iroquois. Esmond and two 

out-stations, So. Dak. 
Edwards, Stephen, Georgetown. New Mex. 
Emerson, Fred, c, Lake Benton and Tyler, 

Minn. 
Ewing, William, Fargo, No. Dak. 
Fales, Elisha F., Palestine, Texas. 
Fowler, Olin L., Slaughter, White River and 

Green River, Wash. Ter. 
Fuller, Edgar R., Mannfield, Fla. 
Gaffney, Matthew, Friendship, N. Y. 
Goodwin, Henry F.,Spearflso, So. Dak. 
Granger, John L., Canton and vicinity, So. Dak. 
Greene, Samuel, Houghton, Tolt. Melrose, Wood- 

inville and Bothells, Wash. Ter. 



Griffith, William, Forman, Harlem and Pioneer, 
No. Dak. 

Haskins, Benjamin P., Galva, Delmore and Good 
Hope, Kan. 

Hayes, James, Macksville, South Vigo and two 
out-stations, Ind. 

Herrington, Erastus C, Cedar Springs and Sand 
Lake, Mich. 

Hibbard, David S., Oneida, Kan. 

Hobart, Miss Clara, Cleveland, O. 

Howell, James, Bala and out-stations, Kan. 

Hugtison, Simeon S., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hull, Irvine T., Talmage, Neb. 

Ives, Joseph B., Nickerson, Kan. 

Jones, D. Sebastian, Lucas and Washington, O. 

Jones, William C, Frostburg, Md. 

Jose, Emanuel, Scotland and six out-stations, So. 
Dak. 

Kerr, Robert, Wakefield, Kan. 

Lindsay, George. Coupeville, Wash. Ter. 

Mathews, Robert J., Hamilton, Mo. 

Morgan, David W., Detroit, Lakeview and Audu- 
bon, Minn. 

Olmstead, Charles, Oswego Falls. N. Y. 

Page, Charles E., Fergus Falls, Minn. 

Page, Henry P., Gaylord and Twelve Mile, Kan. 

Partridge, Lewis C, Longwood and West Long- 
wood, Fla. 

Pearson, T. J., Elmdale, Kan. 

Pinkerton, William B., Henry and vicinity, So. 
Dak. 

Phillips, John H., Los Angeles and East Los An- 
geles, Cal. 

Plack, George W.. CIoster,N. J. 

Prior, Isaac K., Park City, Utah. 

Schaerer, John, Crete and Highland, Neb. 

Shaw, George W., Ashton. So. Dak. 

Sims, Thomas, Valley City, Onska and out-sta- 
tions, No. Dak. 

Smith, Henry H., White Cloud. Mich. 

Smith, James M., Ortonville, Minn. 

Stickney, Edwin H., Harwood, Bethel and Cale- 
donia, No. Dak. 

Taggart, Charles E., St. Ignace, Mich. 

Taylor, Hcrace J., Fidalgo Island and Erie 
School district, Wash. Ter. 

Thing, M. J. P., Linwood,Neb. 

Thomas, Ozro A., John's River, Wynooche and 
Aberdeen, Wash. Ter. 

Tomlinson, Joseph A., Sylvan Lake, Fla. 

Walton, Richard C, Highmore and two out-sta- 
tions, So. Dak. 

Waters, Otis B., Benzonia and Homestead. 
Mich. 

Watson, William H., Valley Springs and Larch- 
wood, So. Dak. 

Webber, Edwin E., De Soto, Mo. 

Wiggins, Aaron W., Anson and Athens, Mo. 



RECEIPTS IN APRIL, 1887. 



MAINE— $255,25. 

Auburn, High Street Cong. Cb., by Rev. 

F. S. Root $7 OG 

Bangor, Willing W T orkersof the Central 

Ch., by B. Sewall 25 00 

Bath, Y. P. S. C. E. of the Winter Street 

Ch., for the Debt, by G. I. Mitctell.. . 10 00 



Cumberland Center, by Rev. E. S. 
Jordan . $17 00 

Cumberland Mills, Warren Ch., of 
which for Debt, $25 ; by Rev. E. M. 
Cousins, to const. F. A. Verrill a L. M. S2 00 

Lewiston, Pine Street Ch., by C. Green- 
wood 10 00 

Newcastle, Second, by Rev. C. D. Crane 70 06 



74 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



June, 



15 94 
5 25 
12 38 

10 00 



1 00 

50 00 



Oroo. by Rev. C. B. Watheu $24 25 

Woodrords, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, 
by J. H. Clark ... 10 00 

NEW HAMPSHIRE— $202.15; of which 
Legacy, $25.00. 

Canaan, A Friend 40 

Dover, First, by J. H. Wheeler 70 02 

Gorham, Rev. G. F. Wright, for the 

Debt 1 00 

Hampton, CoDg. Sunday-school, for the 

Debt, by S. Toule 4 45 

Hanover, A Friend 10 tO 

Keene, Y. P. S. C. E.,for the Debt, by 

W. A. Clifford 10 00 

KiDgston, by B. E. Helrne 11 87 

Lisbon, for the Debt, by Mary R. Cum- 

mings 6 87 

Nashua, Pilgrim, Y'. P. S. C. E., for the 

Dem, by Carrie C. Barker 40 00 

A Friend 3 00 

Newport, Legacy of Lydia P. Wilcox., 

by C. A. Sdshy, adm 25 00 

North Hampton, by K. Gove 13 54 

VERMONT— 1182.20; of which Legacy, 
$30.00. 
Bethel, Ch. $12 09; Y. P. S. C. E., for 

Debt, $i.8i, by Rev. E. S. Fisk 

Bos>on Landing, by M. A. Gates 

Brookfleld, Secoud Cn., by M. Peck — 
Castleton, Woman's H. M. Soc, for 

Woman's Dept.. by Mrs. M. K. Adams 
Ches'er. Y'. P. S. C. E., for tne Debt, 

by J. Cowan 1 1 50 

Cornwall, bv Rev. M. C. Stebbins 25 45 

Hartford, Y. P. S. C. E., add'l for the 

Debt, by Rev. S. I. Briant 

Jamaica, Mrs. Ella J. Robinson, to 

const, her a L. M 

Middlebury, First Annual Instalment 

from Estate of the late Buel Preston, 

by E. C. Severance, Ex 30 00 

Rochester, for the Debt, by J. T. Hub- 

bart 9 85 

St. Johnsbury, East, Cn., for the Debt, 

by J. F. Whiting 4 51 

Towti3hend, special coll. for the Debt, 

by H. A. Goodland 6 32 



MASSACHUSETTS— $5,678.39; of which 
Legacy, $130.00. 
Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. B. 

Palmer, Treas 4, 

Amesbury, Maine Street Ch., by C. F. 

Hovev 

Andover, Rev. B. F. Mills, to const, him 

a L. M ; 

Belcaertown, add'l, by Rev. P. W. Ly- 
man 

Boston, H. M. Assoc by Mrs. H. H. 

Proctor, Treas 

C. D. M 

Braintree, Miss Sarah H. Thayer, in 

full, to const. Mrs. Sarah D. Gage a 

L.M., special 

Infant Sunday-school Easter offering, 
for Children's Bohemian fund, by 

Miss Sarah H. Thayer 

Brockton, Y. P. S. C. E., First Ch., for 

the Debt, by M. S. Gurney 

Campello, South Ch., for tue Debt, by 

Mary K. Keith 

Carlisle, by Mrs. W. B. Chamberlin 

Groton, Union Orthodox Ch., for the 

Debt, by Miss M. P. Joy 

Haydenville. Young People of the 

Cong. Ch., lor the Debi, by N. F. 

SmUh 

Hopkinton, add'l, by Rev. P. B. Wing.. 

Lakeville, Two Friend? 

Longmeartow, The Young Helpers Mis- 
sion Circle, by Mrs. J. H. G.ildthwait. 
Monterey, Cn. Y. P. S. C. E., and 

Birthday gifts, by Dea. J. Townsend. 



500 00 


11 33 


50 00 


25 


183 33 
1 00 



10 00 
5 00' 



30 60 
6 00 



20 83 

35 10 

2 00 

17 00 

16 00 



Northampton, Edwards Ch. Sunday- 

scbool, by S. E. Bridgruan $117 00 

B 5 60 

Norton, Ladies' Miss. Soc, add'l, by 

Rev. J. P. Lane 10 «KV 

Orleans, Y. P. S. C. E., of Cong. Ch., 
for the Debt, by Miss Mary E. Hop- 
kins 10 25 

Oxford, by O. F. Joslin 7 00 

Pawtucket Fal's, Lowell, E. M. H 25 00 

Peabody, Young People's Soc. of the 
West Cong. Ch., for the Debt, by 
Miss Ruth S. Mugford 2 50 

Pelham, Cong. Chapel CiUb, for the 
Debt, by Nellie M. Shores 21 CO 

Princeton, Sunday-schooi, for the Debt, 
by Rev. A. L. Love 25 60 

Rockvil'e. Ch., S3.u8; Y\ P. S. C. E., 
for the Debt, $1.02, by Rev. J. W. Col- 
well 4 05 

Sandwich, Mrs. R. B. Card, for the 
Debt, by Rev. J. B. King 1 to 

South Amherst, by C. W. Shaw 5 55 

South Egremont, Lesacy of Matilda 
Ann Wilcox, by G. V. L Wilcox, Ex. 130 00 

Springfield, South Ch. Sunday school, 

for the Dt-bt, by A. F. Cowles 225 It* 

'• A Thank-offering" loo 00 

Ware, M. A. Barlow, In Memoriam 20 00 

Wellesley, Mary A. Stevens, for the 
Debt 10 00 

Whately, Y. P. S. C. E., for the Debt, 
by H. A. Wilder. 26 50 

RHODE ISLAND— $67.50. 

Pawtucket, Y. P. S. C. E., Park Place 
Ch., tor the Debt, by F. O. Bishop n 00 

Providence, BeneQcent Corg. Sunday- 
school, for the Debt, by W. P. Chapin 50 00 

Tiverton, Ann E. Brown, for the Debt. 40 

CONNECTICUT— $1,488.85; of which Leg- 
acy, $500.00. 
Miss. Soc. of Conn., W. W. Jacobs, 

Treas., by Rev. W. H. Moore, Sec. 

forthe Debt ios cm 

Received by Mrs. S. M. Hotcokiss, Sec. 

Woman's Home Miss. Union of Conn.: 

Hartford. First Ch. Sunday- 
scnou), special $15 to 

Toningford, Ladies' H. M. Soc. 7 no 

22 00' 

Broad Brook, by S. B. Adams 8 '.-5 

Cheshire, Rev. J. B. Stodaard 5 00 

Clinton, Cong. Sunday school, for the 
Children's Bohemian fund, by J. M. 

Wellman 9 04 

Colebrook. Ch., by J. M. Grant 22 04 

Collinsville, by L. S. Heath 40 £6 

Coventry, First, oy J. S. Morgan 27 i0 

Durham, First, by H. G. Newton 10 47 

East Avon, by Rev. N. J. Seeley 16 in 

Farmington, by Dea, H. D. Hawley, to 
const. Miss Anna Y. Barbour a L. M., 

by F. C. Ives 171 88 

Greens Farms, by S. B. Snerwood 25 33 

Groton, by A. J. McLeod, to const. Mrs, 

Bessie W. Copp a L. M 64 CO 

HaoTyme, Ch., $9; R. E. Hungerford, 
$5 ; J. W. Hungtrford, $5, by R. E. 

Hungerford 19 00 

Lakeville, Mrs. M. H. Williams and 
Miss Mary Cleveland, for Children's 

Bohemian fund 5 00 

Merlden, Miss Mary A. Hall 5 60 

Milford, Fiist Ch. of which for Debt, 

$50, by W. D. Piatt 69 15 

New Haven, Y. P. S. C. E., of the Col- 
lege Street Ch., for the Debt 21 92 

A Friend, for the Debt. 2 00 

New London, adct'l, for the Debt, by 

Rev. J. G. Johnson, D.D 1 60 

Norwplk, Shelton Bisseil, for Children's 

Bohemian Fund 1 00 

PI unn>ld, First, by N. P. Bishop 10 00 

Salisbury, Woman's H. M. Sec, for 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY 



75 



Woman's Dept., by Mrs. W. II. Wil- 
liams $43 88 

Sharon, by Kev. J. K. Bourne 91 74 

Southbury. by 8. Tattle 10 25 

SomhlDgton, A Frlen'l 25 ou 

South Windsor, S. T. Wolcott, by S. E. 

Elmore '20 oo 

Thomaston, Ladies' II. M. Soe. of the 

First, by Mrs. G. G. GUbert woo 

Thompsohville, Alice T. Allen 5 40 

lTnionville,Ch., $15.50; V. P. 8. C. E., 
for the Debt, $30.75, by Martha Rich- 
ards 46 '25 

Wapptng, Y. 1'. S. C. E., for the Debt, 

by G. A. Collins 16 50 

WeBl Cornwall, Y. P. S. c. B., for the 

Debt, by C. D. Pratt 18 £0 

West Hartford, Legacy of Miss Cynthia 

c. Seiden. bv II. Talcott, Ex 500 00 

Wetherstield, by S. F. Willard, for the 

Debt 12 (10 

Winthrop, Friends . 200 

NEW YORK— $3,267.21 ; of which Lega- 
cy, $l,0i '0.00. 
Received by Rev.C. c. Creegan: 

Oxford $40 00 

E. L. Corbin 50 00 

Qtica, Plymcuth Ch . 5a T8 

Waiton, G. O. Mead 5 00 

147 78 

Received by Mrs. L. H. Cobb, 
Treas. Woman's H. M. Union: 
Hammondsville, Woman's Aux. $8 30 
Homer, by Mrs. Coleman 

Hitchcock 10 10 

Irouville, Woman's Aux 5 00 

M arind, Ladies' Aux 10 00 

New York City, Ladies' H. M. 

Soc. of Pilgrim Ch., special. . 50 00 
Oswego Falls, Woman's Aux., 

special 5 00 

Perry Center, Mrs. C. W. But- 
ler 25 00 

Schenectady, Ch. and Sunday- 
school, $10; Ladies' Miss. 
Soc. $15, special, by Rev. J. 

II. Munsell 55 00 

Sherburne, Ladies' Aux ..'.... 35 00 
West Groton, Young Ladies' 
Miss. Circle, for Woman's 

Dept 10 oo 

213 30 

Aquebogue, by C. F. Wells m 00 

Brooklyn, South Ch., by J. Crowell 150 on 

Sfuy vesant AveDue Ch., by B. Linikin 11 50 
Plymouth Ch., of which $50 from W. 
B. Boorum, to const, him a L. M., 

by S. V. Wnite 596 02 

Central Cong. Sunday-school, spe- 
cial 67 32 

Sunday-school of the Ch. of the Cove- 
nant, by W. F. Schmidt 10 00 

Useful Workers, Rochester Avenue 

Ch., by Dr. J. G. Roberts 10 on 

Mtss Sarah Fiske, by G. C. Ripley. . . . 100 00 

New Lots Ch., by W. Macdonald 30 85 

Buffalo, by Rev. A. L. Smalley 10 00 

Carthage, b7 Rev. G. B. Rowley 12 0(1 

Coventryville, Y. P. S. C. E., of Cong. 

Ch., by Rev. A. Caldwell 13 on 

Crown Point, Second, by J. A. Penfield. 20 Oo 

Ellington, by Rev. A. W. Taylor 3 60 

Gaines, by G. D. Ward 12 50 

Gloversville, Ch ., by J. O. Karker 38 00 

Hamilton, by O. S. Campbell 25 00 

Homer, Cong. Sunday-school, by C. A. 

Skinner 25 on 

Howells, by W. E. Mapes 8 50 

Jamestown, First, $50; Y. P. S. C. E., 
$8, for the Debt, by Rev. E. C. Hall, 
to const. Rev. Henry Frank a L. M. .. 58 00 
Lenox, Mrs. A. H. D. Johnson in full, to 

const, her a L . M 30 00 

Little Valley, by Rev. J. H. McK.ee. ... 13 80 
New Y'ork City, Rev. Samuel Colcord, 



by Kev. Dr. Taylor, $300 ; Mrs. Park- 
er, $ln0; Mrs. Josiah M. Fisk, to 
const, tier a L. M.,$50; R. K. B.,$10; 

W. Abbatt, $1 $461 00 

Nineveh, A Friend 100 Oft 

North Java, bv Rev. J. H. Mallows 5 24 

North Walton, by W. M. Hoyt 11 91) 

Poutrhkeepsie, Mrs. E. M. Orton, for the 

Debt 5 00 

Salamanca, bv Rev. G. E. Sopher 11 6* 

Sherburne, Lepacv of Mrs. Melissa s. 

Bickuell.by 11. G. Newton 1,000 OO 

Spencerporf, Ch., $32.66; Y. P. S. C. E., 

the Debt, $7.35, in full to const. J. C. 

Brigham a L. M., by Kev. C. N. Fitch 

(Jtica, Bethesda Welsh Ch., by W. W. 

George 

Walton, First, add'l, by G. W. Fitch... 



40 0* 



5 80 
2 00 



4 25 

5 eft 



7 81 



NEW JERSEY— $67.94. 
Jersey City, by Rev. N. M. Sherwood. . 17 94 
Orange Valley, Mrs. Loveil Mason, Sen., 
by John Wiley 50 CO 

PENNSYLVANIA -$209.34. 

Alden, by Rev. D. J. Jones 

Bangor, by Rev. J. Williams 

Catasauqua, Welsh Cti., by Rev. D. D 

Thomas 

East Smithflelfi, by A. O. Tracv 15 OO 

Mercer, Cone. Ch., by G. T. Sykes and 

C. S. Burwell, Com 166 35 

Pittston and Exeter, by Rev. S. B. 

Cooper 3 83 

Ridge way, Sutday-school, by J. D. 

Bell 7 10 

MARYLAND— $10.00. 
Baltimore, Mrs. Susan D. Metcalf's 

Miss. Box 5 00 

Frostburg, W. C. Jones 5 CO 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA- $46.53. 
Washington, Ladies' H. M. Soc. of the 
First Ch., by Miss L. Patterson, of 
which special, $25 46 65 

WEST VIRGINIA— $7.88. 

Huntington, by G. Martin 1 88 

ARKANSAS— $2.05. 

Curtis, by Rev. L>. E. Davie^ 2 05 

FLORIDA^62.17. 

Daytona and Port Orange, by Rev. C. 
M. Bingham 25 ot> 



Interiacnen, by Kev. J. McKeaD. 
Longwood and West Longwood, by Rev. 

L. C. Partridge 

Meade, by C. F. Marsh 

Pensacoia, W. C. Sneiicer 

Tavares and Lone Park, by Rev. R. T. 

Hall 

INDIAN TERRITORY— $3.00. 

Doaksville, by Rev. A. Groes 

NEW MEXICO— $5.50. 

San Rafael, by Rev. J. P. Salazar. 



White Oass, by Rev. R. E. Lund 

OHIO— $799.25. 
Received bv Rev. J. G. Fraser: 
Hudson, by Miss E. E. Metcalf$ll 96 

Jettersjn, by E. J. Betts 6 54 

Lorain, Miss H. A. Burgelt, by 

Rev. A. D. Barber l 00 

Plain, by W. H. Mimon 6 50 

Union ville, by A. S. Hardy 8 66 

Wakeman, special coll 7 oo 



7 50 



3 00 



2 00 

3 50 



41 6tf 
10 65> 



Chagrin Falls, bv Rev. R. W. Walters. 

Young People's Sec, f( r the Debt, by 

Rev. O. D. Fisher 9 CO 

Cleveland, Jecnings Avenue Ch., by *• ' 

W. J. Sheppard loo OO 



76 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



June 



Elyria, First Ch.,of which Irom Heman 
Ely, $250 ; $433 ; Sunday-school, $40, 

by H. Ely $473 00 

Huutsburg, Sunday-school, $10; Mrs. 
Lucy Strong's Bible class for the Debt, 

$5, by L. G. Strong 15 00 

Lodi, by Geo. Burr 4 90 

Lucas and Worthington, by Rev. D. S. 

Jones 26 10 

Oberlin, First, bv H. G. Husted 96 34 

Riverside, by R. L. Read 15 00 

Rollersville and West MUlgrove, by 
Rev. J. e. Thompson 7 60 

INDIANA— $49.92. 
Received by Rev. L. P. Rose: 

East Gilead $2 20 

Macksville 2 81 

Olive 4 35 

Solsberry.' 1 10 

Terre Haute, Womans' H. M. 

Soc 10 00 

20 46 

Central and Mauckport, by Rev. J. True- 
blood 3 50 

Terre Haute, Cong. Sunday-school, by 

F.L.Paise 10 46 

Young Ladies of Cong. Ch., by Sadie 
M. Gilbert 15 50 

ILLINOIS— $272.00. 

Chicago, A Friend, special 240 00 

East Paw Paw, A Friend 3 oo 

Freeport, L. A. Warner 25 oo 

Lancaster, Mary C. Peters 10 

WethersHeld, Mrs. A. B. Kellogg 3 90 

MISSOURI -$298.50. 
Received by Mrs. H. A. Brown, 
Treas. Woman's H. M. Soc: 

LebanoD. L. H. M. S $11 00 

Meadville, L. H.M. S 5 00 

Missouri, W. 11. M. S 10 oO 

St. Louis, L. H. M. S., First Ch. 

$12; Young Ladies' Sec, $42. 54 00 
Webster Groves, L. H. M. S... 5 00 

85 00 

Kansas City, Ch., $42.75; Sunday- 
school, $42.75 ; Young People, $50, by 

J. F. Dowuing 135 50 

By E. A. Fussell 50 00 

Kidder, by Rev. J. M. Bowers 13 00 

Lenhart, bv Rev. C. M. Schwarzaner. . . 2 oo 

St. Louis', Rev. F. C . Woodward 5 00 

Verdella, by Rev. R . T. Mario w 8 00 

MICHIGAN— $1,079.8J. 
Received by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Treas. 
Woman's H. M. Soc. of Mich.: 

Alba, Women of the Cn $2 00 

Alpena, W. H. M. Mite Boxes.. 34 20 

Ann Arbor, W. H. M. S 27 00 

Benton Harbor, Mite Boxes 17 17 

Benzonia, Mrs. O. B. Waters.. 5 00 

Berry ville, Mrs. J. G. Berry 2 00 

Calumet, W. H. M. S. and Mite 

Boxps 77 33 

Cheboygan, Sunday-school, for 

Children's Bohemian fund.. . 1 50 
Clare, Ladies' Union Mite Boxes 5 oo 

Cooper, W. H. and F. M. S 9 00 

Detroit, Mrs. E. D. White 2 00 

Dundee, W. H. M. S 5 00 

Edmore, Pine Tree Mission 

Band 1 78 

Essexville, Quarterly coll 4 00 

Flint, W. H. M. S 20 00 

Grand Rapids, Second, W. M. S. 12 00 

Park(!h.,L. M. S. $23 ; Mite 

Box Coll., $21.61 44 61 

Greenville, W.H. M. Mite Boxes 20 12 
Hancock, W. H. M. S. and Mite 

Boxes 37 67 

Hartford, W. H. M. S. and Mite 

Boxes 4 00 

Highland Station, W. H. M. 8.. 4 83 



Hopkins, Second,Sunday -school, 

for the Debt ... $5 00 

Irving, One cent pledges of Six 

Ladies 3 12 

Ithaca, Mite Boxes of W. M. S. 5 10 

Laingsbnrg, A Friend t 00 

Lansing, A Friend 10 00 

Mason, Mrs. K. L. Bassett 1 00 

Mattawan, W. H. M. S 12 00 

Mecosta, W. H. M. S. 14 CO 

Middleville, W. H. M. S.... l 50 

Nashville, W. H. M.S., $4.20; 

Mite Boxes, $4.28 8 48 

Olivet, L. A. S 10 00 

Pledges of the Young Ladies 

of Young Ladies' Hall 12 00 

Onekama, W. M. L. Mite Boxes 11 45 

Onondaga. Ladies in tne Ch 66 

Pierpont, In response to Christ- 
mas Greetin gs 1 50 

Reed City, W. H. M. 8. Mite 

Boxes 20 80 

Rondo, Women of the Ch 7 oo 

St. Ignace, Children's Mission 

Band 1 60 

St. Joseph, L. M. 8., $13.80; for 

the Debt, $5; Busy Bees, $5.. 23 50 
Sand Beach, Mrs. C. S. Nims.. . 5 00 

Stanton, W. H. M. S 5 00 

Three Oaks, W.H. M. S 1100 

Traverse City, Home pnd 

Benev. Soc. Mite Boxes 10 00 

Vicksburg, W.H. M.S 4 00 

Wolverine, Pledges of a few 

Ladies 2 00 

$522 92 

Received by Rev. L. Warren: 

Ada, First $7 00 

Alpena 58 50 

Alpine and Walker 19 00 

Calumet, A Friend 20 oo 

Cannon 4 00 

Clinton 3 S5 

Cooper 14 22 

Covert, Y. P. S.C. E 75 

Delta 5 63 

Dexter 6 50 

Frankfort 6 08 

Hamburg .• 5 oo 

Irving 6 42 

Olivet 78 19 

Pontiac, Ch., $27.50; Sunday- 
school, $15; Merry Gleaners, 

$10 52 50 

Roscommon 100 

Royal Oaks 5 15 

Three Oaks 25 60 

Vermontville 67 00 

Pastors' Bible class 3 50 

Wacousta 14 92 

404 21 

Ann Arbor, First, by K. Campbell 69 25 

Bangor, by Rev. A. B. Cochran 2 00 

Bellaire and Central Lake, by Rev. H. 

A. Kerns 4 48 

Big Rapids, by Hev. H. H. Parker 15 00 

Breckenridge, by Rev. A. A. Wall 10 28 

Cedar Springs and Sand Lake, by Rev. 

E. C. Herrington 9 OO 

Chelsea, Cong. Sunday-school, by E. G. 

Hoag 5 05 

Hersey, by Rev. T. A. Porter 5 oo 

Highland S'ation, by Rev. S. E. Lincoln 5 00 
Horton's Bay, $1.40; Hayes, 75c, by 

Rev. J. F. Crane 2 15 

Kalamazoo, A class of little boys in 
the Cong. Sunday-school, for Chil- 
dren's Bohemian fund, by Annie E. 

Jeffers 2 00 

Manistee, by Rev. C. G. fJundquist 2 00 

Pentwater, by Rev. L. F. Waldo 1 1 50 

Sheridan, by Rev. A. H. Claflin 10 00 

WISCONSIN— $43.55. 
Received by Rev. Q. A. Hood: 
Bloomer $6 00 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



77 



Clear Lake. 



$2 55 

for the Debt, 



10 00 
25 00 



Kenosha, Y. P. S. C. E. 
by U. M. Baldwin.... 
Milwaukee, 8. Y. L... 

IOWA-$C9.25. 

Algona, Mrs. M. II. Carter 10 00 

Downey, Mr. and Mrs. D. O. Goodrich, 

to const. O. II. Brainerd a I,. M 50 00 

Keokuk, bv Kev. J. Wenstrand 4 25 

Webster City, Ladles' Cong. Miss. Soc, 

by Mrs. O. C. Donaldson 5 00 

MINNESOTA— $516.56. 
Received by Kev. J. H.Morley: 

Elk Kiver, Union Ch $4 66 

High Forest, by P. M. Tuttle.. if 00 
Mautorville, by C. W.Cushinau 1.6 no 

Minneapolis, Plymouth Ch 9' 1 00 

Pilgrim Gleaners 20 00 

Zumbrota, Sunday-school, by 
Lettie A. Rogers 9 29 

149 95 
Woman's Minn. H. M. Soc, by Mrs. 
J. N. Cross, Treas.: 

Clearwater $8 28 

Elk Kiver 6 00 

Excelsior 4 13 

Hamilton 7 00 

Minneapolis, Plymouth, W. H. 

M. S 42 00 

AFrieod 10» 00 

Northiieid, Willing Workers.... 14 54 

Paynesville 3 00 

St. Cloud, Busy Bees, for Chil- 
dren's Bohemian fund 5 00 

St. Paul, Park Ch., W. M. s.... 25 00 
Waseca 18 57 

233 57 

Ada, by Rev. S. Stone 

Aitkin, by Rev. A. J. Hayner 

Center Chain and Fairmount, by Rev. 

J. H. Nason 

Dassel, by Kev. S. M. Bronson 

Glyndon, bv Kev. C. W. Bird 

Loving daughter, la Memoriam 

A Thank-offering. Mrs. S. N. Millard. 
Hancock and Lake Emily, by Rev. E. 

N. Ruddock 

Hawley, by Rev. o. M. Smith 

Minnesota, A Friend 

Owatonna, Ch., $22.93; Young People's 

Soc, $20; Sunday-school, $3. IS, by I. 

W. Burch, for the Debt 

Plainview, by J. H. Davis, Jr 

Rose Creek and Lyle, by Rev. J. S. 

Rounce 

Rushford, by Rev. W. W. Snell 

Stephen, by Rev. W. Steele 5 00 

Stillwater, by Rev. J. H. Albert 3 50 

Walnut Grove, by Rev. G. H. Smith... 2 00 

Wiscoy , by Re v . R . W. Harlow 3 00 

Worthington, Union Cong. Sunday- 
school, by G. O. Moore 5 00 

KANSAS— $265.20. 
Received by Rev. J. G Dougherty, 
Treas. Kan. H. M. Soc: 
Kansas, Woman's H. M. Soc. .$10 00 
Oswego 5 00 15 00 

Almena, by Rev. H. H. Avery 5 00 

Ash Rock, New Harmonv and Mount 

Ayr.by Rev. R. S. Osbbrn S 50 

Blue Rapids, by Rev. E. Skinner 6 00 

Carbondale, $4.41 ; Ladies' Miss. Soc, 

$10 ; Ridge way, $2.84, by Rev. M. J. 

Morse 17 25 

CawkerCity, by Rev. T. A. Humphrey. 14 75 

Chenev, by Kev. J. II. Lippard 10 00 

Chetopa, M. E. Pinkerton, for the Debt. 2 Co 
Clear Creek, $2; Onaga, $1.50, by Rev. 

J. J. Wilson 3 50 



383 52 


17 00 


3 00 


7 50 


2 00 


8 32 


25 


25 


2 50 


7 43 


25 


46 11 


12 18 


1 00 


6 75 



Dry Creek, by Rev. H. Rees $5 oo 

Dunlap, by Rev. G. P. Clania 7 50 

Elmdale, by Rev. T. J. Pearson 16 45 

Eudora, Josie Anderson 1 00 

Fair view, by Rev. L. M. Bonnett 5 00 

Hetier, by Rev. C. B. Messer 3 00 

Hill City, by Rev. N. R. George 2 00 

Longton aud Elk Falls, by Rev. II. H. 

Gilchrist 2 10 

Manhattan, Mrs. Mary Parker, by Rev. 

R. D. Parker 60 00 

Topeka, Students of Washburn College, 

by A. R. Harper 2 05 

Udall, by B. F. Baker 1 00 

Wabaunsee, First Ch. of ('hi ist 1 75 

Waketleld, by Rev. R. Kerr 8 00 

White City by Rev. W. 1). Webb 18 35 

Wichita, by Rev. J. H. Parker 50 00 

NEBRASKA— $461.01. 

Received by Rev. J. L. Maiie: 

Albion $21 00 

Camp Creep, bv G. F. Lee 8 65 

Fairfield, by Rev. C. E. Har- 

wood ._. 50 00 

Omaha, First, by J. E. Wilbur. 30 80 

Potter, by C. ADdeison 5 00 

Clay Center, by N. M. Moulton 6 50 
Freemout, add'l, by Bev. L. F. 

Barry 50 

Hastings, by Rev. W. Walters. 67 75 
Omaha, First, by J. E. Wilbur, 

$100; W. Fleming, $25 125 00 

Second, by S. Burns 5 00 

Wilcox, by Rev. J. W. Haddeu 50 



Chadron, by Rev. H. Bross 

Crete and Highland, by Rev. J. Schaer- 
er 

Culbertson aud Osborne, by R„v. J. Ar- 
nold 

De Witt and Plymouth, by Rev. D. E. 
Hathaway 

Elk City, by Rev. J. N. Zinimer 

Heminaford, by Rev. N. E. Gardner... 

McCook, by Rev. W. Suess 

Naponee, by Rev. W. Woolman 

Ogalalla, Ch. Easter offering, by Dea. 
E. Cooper 

Red Cloud, by Rev. M. C. Butler 

Spring Creek, by Rev. P. Wddmann. . . 

Wahoo, by Rev. A. A. Cressman 

NORTH DAKOTA— f 32. 81. 

Forman, by Rev. W. Griffith 

Fort Abercrombie, by Rev. W.Edwards 

Grand Forks, by Rev. A. L. Gillett 

Sanborn, $3 ; Daze.v, $2; A Thank-offer- 
ing, $5, by Rev. J. W. Donaldson 

Valley City andOnska, by Rev.T. Sims 

SOUTH DAKOTA— $120.09. 

Armour, by Rev. W. H. Thrall.. 

Bowdle.by Rev. W. Macreadv 

Cresbard, W. H. M. S., for the Debt, 
by Mrs. C. G. Black 

Fire Steele, W. H. M. Soc, by Mrs. C. 
G. Black 

Highmore, Rev. R. C. Walton and wife 

Huron, by Rev. A. Wurrschmidt 

Iroquois, W. H. M. S., by Mrs. C. G. 
Black 

Lake Henry, Ladies Aid Soc, for Wo- 
man's Dept., by Rev. F. G. Appleton. 

Lake Preston, for Children's Bohemian 
Fund, by Rev. A. H. Robbina 

Mitchell, by Rev. C. W. Wurrschmidt. 

Plaukiuton, Woman's H. M. Soc, by 
Mrs. C. G. Black 

Springfield, by Rev. C. Seccombe 

Templeton, by Rev. S. F. Huntley 

Vermdlion, Sunday-school, for Chil- 
dren's Bohemian fund, by Mrs. C. G. 
Black 

Vermillion, Woman's H. M. Soc, by 
Mrs.C. G. Black 



320 70 
13 05 



4 62 
4 00 



10 00 
7 50 
4 00 

34 50 
1 14 


4 00 

15 00 

2 50 

40 00 


2 50 
5 00 

59 09 


10 00 
6 22 


S 04 
5 00 


2 50 


2 00 
2 50 

5 17 


5 00 


6 00 


11 00 
1 00 


13 00 
4 88 
19 00 


5 00 


15 00 



78 



THE HOME MISSIONARY, 



June* 



Watertown. by Rev. H. D. Wianl $10 Of) 

Yanktou, Caroline M. Hyde, for the 

Debt 5 00 

COLORADO— 1481.65. 

Breckenridge, by Rev. J. B. Hewitt 7 65 

Ca moo City, P. A. Ray nolds 47 1 00 

South Pueblo, by Rev. R. B. Wright... 3 00 

UTAH-$1.00. 

Salt Lake City, Anna Baker 1 00 



.'S.95. 



CALIFORNIA- 
Reeeived by J. S. Hutchinson, Finan- 
cial Agent : 

Grass Valley $115 90 

BJward Coleman 5uo 00 

Oakland, Plymouth Ave. Ch.. 11 20 
Santa Barbara, C. P. Low, 

Treas 110 00 

Woman's Miss.Soc.of Cong Ch. 20 no 



Berkley, by Rev. W. P. Bickford 

Corralitos, by Rev. O. K. Ross 

Edgemont and Eagle Rocs, by Rev. E. 

Cash • 

Fresno, by Rev. J. S. Voorhees 

Puriock, by Rev. J. H. Warren 

Los Angeles, Y. P. S. C. E. of First Ch., 

tor the Debt, by Emnw Granite 

Mt. Shasta, Rev. T. Magill 

Ontario, by Rev. W. H. Wolco't 

Rocklin, by Rev. H. C. Langley 

San Jacinto, by Rev. D. McCunn 

Sierra Vallev, b? Rev. C. E. Phil brook. 

Tulare, by Rev . J. G. Eckles 

Vacaville, by Rev. H. W. Jones 

Vernon, by Rev. P. A. Field 

OREGON— $5.00. 

Lexington, by Rev. E. R. Beach 

WASHINGTON TERRITORY— $131.20. 
Received by Rev. N. F. Cobleigh: 

Atahnum $15 50 

Eooicotf IS 30 

Pasco Junction 4 30 

Ritzville 40 

Marbuck 3 00 

Colfax, by Rev. T. W. Walters 

Farmington and Granite Hill, by E. J. 

Singer 

Fidalgo Island, by Rev. H. J. Taylor... 
Ritzviile, by Re'. G. H.Atkinson, D.D. 
Ritzville and Endicott, by Rev. F. H. 

Pruiht 

Seattle, PIvmoutti Ch., Y. P. S. C. E., 

for the Debt, by M. A. Burwell 

Tacoma, by Rev. B. Johausou 

Sunday-scnod and Y. P. s. C. E., for 

the Debt, by Fannie Lovell 

Wenas and Natchez, by Rev. E. W. 

Dixon 

Wnite Salman and Hood River, by Rev. 

F. Balch 

CHINA-S5.00. 
Tientsin, Mariin L.Stimson 



757 10 


6 id 


3 00 


17 00 


25 00 


6 05 


so no 


4 no 


7 00 


5 00 


2 On 


6 20 


30 no 


10 00 


10 60 



41 on 

25 00 


1 00 

2 50 
7 25 


2 50 


15 00 

16 50 


7 20 


7 00 


5 75 



5 00 



TURKEY— $50.00. 
Constantinople, Rev. G. Washburne, 

D.D 50 fO 

Home Mis3i >n.uy 172 24 



Total $17,383 98 

Donations of Clothing, etc. 
Brandon, Vt., Ladies, by Mrs. C. M. Win- 

slov, box and freight $36 85 

Brooklyn, N. Y, Central Ch., S.S.,box 

and barrel books. 
Hantord, Ct., Elizabeth Chapel, by Prof. 
Wm. Thompson, box hymn books. 
Ladies' Bcnev. Soc. of Asylum Hill Ch., 
by Mrs. Geo. F. Stone, box and freight. 216 80 



South Ch., by W. H. M. Union, box, 
barrel and freight $230 26 

Kent, ct., Lades' Sew. Soc. by Mrs. 
J >hn Ilopson, barrel and ftvighr* 64 42 

Mlddlet >wn, ct., Lsdies' Home Mi?s. Soc. 
of First Ch., by C M. Bacon, barrel and 
freight. 35 00 

Morns. Ct., The " Gleaners'' and other 
friends, by Rev. Edwin Leonard, barrel 
aud freight 7700 

New Haven, Ct., Ladies' Home Miss. Soc. 
of First Cn., by Mary E. Bennett, three 
boxes and freight 750 20 

Providjnce.R.I.,Ladies'H.M.S.of FustCh. 

byMrs.E. K.Wadhams,boxandfre ght 165 (,« 

Randolph, Mass., Mrs. William Perter. 
box. 

Waterbury, Ct.. Ladies' Union of Second 
Ch., by Mrs. G. C. Hill, box, cash and 
freight 65 00 

Worce-ter, Mass., Ladies' Benev. Soc. of 
Union Ch., by Mrs. E. H. Vaill, barrel 
and freight 125 00 

Receipts of the Massachusetts Home Missionary So- 
rt- tt/ in April, by Rev. Edwin B. Palmek, 
Treas. 

Abington, First, bv E . M. Nash $30 3 8 

Amherst, Rev. L. P. Hickok, D.D 150 00 

Andover, Ballardvale, by Rev. s.Bowker, 

Debt ago 

Augusta, Maine, A friend, Debt 10 00 

Ayer, by Levi Wallace 20 29 

Beverly, Dane St., three Cuildreu 19 00 

Boston, O. A. S., to const. Mrs. Helen F. 

Aldri.hL. M. of A. H. M. S 100 no 

Coin of gold 15 00 

Mrs. Susan Collins 10 00 

Estate of Catherine P. A. Lillie, by Gor- 

ham Rogers, adm 400 00 

Rev. Geo. F. Stanton, to const. John H. 

Buti rick L. M 30 00 

Chailestown, Winthrop, by Geo. S. 

Poole 138 52 

Dorchester, Pilgrim, by S. B. Holman. 35 Of 

Village, Ladies, Debt 9 10 

Roxbuiy, H. Wellington, Debt 50 00 

Immanuel. by Francis J. Ward 50 no 

W T est, So. Evan., by J. H. Guild 47 9 2 

Shawmut, Mrs. H. D. Hydt, by P. M. 

Newcomb 25 on 

Y. P. S. C. E., by Florence N. Bates, 
to const. Wm. E. Griffls, D.D., Mrs. 
Katharine S. Gnffis. oeo.E. Adams, 
and Frederic A. Farrar L. Ms. of A. 

H.M.S,Debt 

Bradford, Leonard Tenney 

Braintree, First Parish, A friend, Debr.. 
Brim held. First, Sunduy-schocl. by Geo. 

L. Plimpton, Debt .' 

Broekron, Joseph Hewitt 

Brooktield, Mrs. R. B. M mrague 

Brookiine, H. B. Eagpr, Debt 

Harvard, by H. B. Eager 

Brookiine, N. H.. Ch. and Sunday-school, 
by E. M. Peterson, through Miss Flor- 
ence N. Bates, of Boston, Debt 

Burlington, by Samuel Se wall 

Cambridgeport, Pilgrim, by N. H. Hol- 

brook, of which $20 foi Debt 

Chatham, bv Geo. \twood 

Chelsea, First, by H. W. Jitters 

Chester, Y. P. S. C. E., by Edith M. 

Ke"fe, Debt 

Clinton, First Ev., by H. H. Greene, Debt 
Y P. S. C. E., by Jennie B. Bourne, 

Debt 3 

Concord, Triu., by Thomas Todd, add'], 

Debt 

Conway, Mrs. Austin Rice 20 

Dan vers. First, by George Tapley . . 88 

Enfield, by Lyman D. Potter '. 50 

Essex, by Mrs. M. C. Osgood 60 

Everett, Miss. Con. Coll., by Geo. Sargent, 

Debt 20 

FramLugham South, Y. P. S. C. E., by P. 



200 





inn 


e 


50 





10 


00 





1 


5 


On 


25 


00 


i'8 


41 


5 





.7 


3 


34 




in 




23 


00 


8 


50 


106 


1 



1887. 



THK HOME MISSIONARY. 



79 



L. Oaks, Debt $9 50 

Gardner, West, Mrs. K. P. Eastman, 
Debt 3 40 

Grafton, Ev. Cong., by Geo. K. Nichols, 
of wtilch $50, by Mrs. \V. R. Hill, to 
const. Miss Amelia M. Towne, of Charl- 
ton, L. M. of A. II. M. Sue UT 88 

Saumlersvilie, Y. P. S. C. E., by B. F. 
Perkins, add'J, Debt 70 

Halle, Sabrana Walker, fund, Income of. 02 50 

Hampden Benevolent Association, 
by Chas. Marsh, Tr.: 

(Jhicopee, Third $.4 80 

Holyoke, First 13 87 

MOII80U 36 00 

Monson, Y. P. C. A 36 25 

Palmer, Second fiO 00 

Springfield, First 294 88 

Olivet 68 50 

South 157 40 

West Held, Secoud 26 <»1 

696 77 

Hardwick, Calvinistic, by Rev. C. M. 
Pit rce 5 00 

Hatfield, by Robert W. Woods, Debt 18 00 

Sunday-school class of Mrs. E. A. Hub- 
bard, by R. W. W., Debt 24 00 

North, branch Sunday-school, by R. 
W. W.,Debt 8 00 

Haverhill, Estate of E. J. M. Haile, Exec- 
utors, by J. L. Hobson 5,C00 00 

Housatonic, Rev. E.J. Giddings, Debt... 25 00 
By S. W. Wright 94 03 

Huntington, First, by C. H. Kirkland, 
Norwich, Mass 5 65 

Lancaster, Ev. Suuday-school, by Ellen 
Wasgait, Debt 16 45 

Lee, Y. P. S. C. E., by B. T. Gale, Debt. . 75 00 

Le >intnster. North, Mrs. A. G. Boutelles, 
Sunday-school class, special, for Rev. 
H. A. Sehaufrler's work. 6 30 

Lowell, High St., Y. P. S. C. E., by Mat- 
tie S. Whittemore, Debt 10 00 

Maiden, Linden, Mrs. T. D. Goodhue, 
Debt 1 00 

Manchester, by Geo. F. Allen 3120 

Marion, Y. P. S. C. E., by Mary H. Hath- 
eway. Debt 7 00 

Marshflela, First, Sunday-school, by 

Grace P. Hatch, Debt 10 00 

Y. P. S. C. E., by Grace P. Hatch, Debt. 2 50 

Meufield, Second, Y. P. S. C. E., by Mrs. 
Annie Stinson. Debt 12 75 

Medford, West, bv E. C. Smith, Debt 17 25 

Milford, Willing Woikers, byllattie Theo 
Clark 20 00 

Milles, Church of Christ, Sunday-school, 
by E. F. Lovell, Debl 7 38 

Needham, by Rev. J. F. Gleason 11 48 

New Boston, L. A. VVeldon 5 61 

Newburyport. North, by J. B. Creasey.. 23 00 

Newton, .Mrs. Edward Spear and daugh- 
ter, Debt 25 00 

Auburudale, by Chas. C. Burr 503 37 

Youug J, adies' Mission Circle, bv M. 

L. Smith, Debt .* 21 CO 

Center, First, oy C. H. Bennett 159 78 

For A. H. M. S., by C. H. Bennett 16 02 
Eliot, by D. E. Snow 75 00 

Newtonville, Central, Y. P. S. C, E., by 
Geo. W. Auryansen, Debt. 5 00 

Newton, West, Second, Sunday-school, by 
J. A. Symonds, A. H. M. S 35 00 

North Adams, First, by Wni. F. West.. 46 21 

Orleans, Estate of Sarah Sparrow, by Lot 
Higgins, Adm 15 24 

Peabody, South, bv Geo. F. Osborne (of 
which $142 for Debt) 202 00 

Pelham, by Rev. W. K. Vaill, Debt 2 00 

Peru, Sunday-9chool, by 8. S. Bowen, Tr. 10 00 

Pnillip-ion, Mr. Ellsworth Sawyer, by 
Rev. S. B. Andrews 7 50 

Quincy, Evan., by Rev. E. Norton and 

James L. Baxter 76 00 

Wollaslon, Acolytes, by Rev. B. B. 
Sherman, Debt 22 00 



Sunday-school, by H. W. Marshail, 

Debt jty ■>!> 

Randolph, Vcmng Ladies' Missionary 

Society, by Miss Carrie L. Thayer, Debt 10 00 

Sunday-school, by G. II. Wilkins, Supt 20 00 

Reading, A friend, by S. G. B. Pearson.. io 00 

By S. G B. Pearsou "5 oo 

Revere, by Rev. J. P. Bixby \[ S 8 S5 

Beachmont, Union Evan., by Rev. J. R 

Rockland',' Y.'p". 's'.' C.' e'.,' ' by Julia I)' 
Lane, to const. Clarence E. Rice and 
Julia D. Lant L. Ms. of A. II. M. s 

Debt ' i 00 co 

Royalston, First, Sunday-school, Easter 

Offering, by W. B. Goddard 26 00 

Rutland,by W. C. Temple 1200 

Sandwich, Calvinistic, by II. 11 Heald « 19 

Sharon, by D. W. Pettee " <* J{ 

By D. W. Pettee, add'l for Debt... '" 2 00 

Skowhegau, Me., by Ceo. W. Gray 3 00 

Somerville, Broadway, bj G. \v. s. Hnse 10 67 
Ladies, by Mrs. James Williams. 

Debt ,, 05 

Franklin, St., by E. D. Conant...."" 33s 26 

West, Day St., " Mite Box," special 2 35 

South Hadley, First, by L. M. Gaylord 26 00 
Springfield, North, Y. P. S. C. E., by K 

P. Alden, Surplus for A . H. M. S. ' '>o 24 
Sterling, A S. s. Class, by Emma A Will 

der , 200 

Sudbury, A friend, by Rev. D. W. Good- 
ale |,| nn 

Taiku, China, Rev. J. B. Thompson 5 nn 

Taunton, East, Rev. E. W. Allen, Debt" 5 (in 

Topstleld, by Dea. E. S. Clifford.... 27 00 

Townsend, A friend, by J. M. Boutelie..' 5 00 

Miss S. E. Peck ham, by J. M. Boutelie 2 75 

Sunday-scnool, by E. A. Blood. 7 13 

Upton, First, by D. C. Buck " 77 n 

Waltham, PhebeS. Garfield 1 40 

Debt ;; 10 00 

Way;aud, H. B. Braman 5 00 

Westborough, Debt ' 10 00 

West Boylston, First, by E. Beaman'Rice 31 66 
West Brookfield, by C. T. Huntington, A. 

H. M. S li 60 

Westport, Pacific, Union, Sunday-school, 

by J. C. Macomber r, 4 - 

Whitin, J. C. Fund, Income of 362 5 , 

Whitman, by W. R. Vining 38 15 

Williamstown, White Oaks, by Rev w 

W.Winchester ' -, , Ul 

Wilmington, Sabra Carter Fund, Income 

of ., 5 on 

Winchester, D. N. Skillings Annum ...'. 10 ) 

First, by Eugene Tappan " jj 00 

Worcester, "Tithe," A. H. M. S... i 00 

Central, by E. H. Sanford 197 00 

Pilgrim, by Etta H. Wilcox, Debt. . . ' 5 no 

Union, by S. Newton, Debt 145 69 

rr „• , $11,259 33 

Home Missionary ^ 01 

Correction.— Page 37, 1st Column, 36th ' ° ** 
line, for (by Albert Gay, $1.(0, of wnich, 
etc.) read (by Albert Gay §100, of which, 
etc.) 



Donations of Clothing, etc., received and reported 
at the rooms of the Mass. Home Miss. Soc. in 
April. 

Bedford, Pine Needle Mission Circle, by 
MissM. W. Webber, barrel and freight $92 65 

Bridgewater, Central Square, Ladies, by 
Mrs. Wm. Bassett. Cash, $3.07, and bar- 
rel, $125 128 e7 

Brookline, Harvard, Ladies, by Mrs. H. 

H. Robinson, box 222 18 

Anonymous, Quilt '.".......'. 2 50 

Cohasset, Ladies' Benevolent Society, "by 
M. O. stetson, barrel and freight 101 6> 

Holyoke, Second, Ladies' Benevolent Bo'- 



80 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



June, 1887. 



ciety, by Agnes R. AllyD, box of cloth- 
ing $156 10 

Pittsfleld, First, Ladies' Benev. Society, 
by S. B. Adam, box, freight and cash.. 125 00 

Randolph, First, Ladies' Benev. Soc, by 
Mrs. Wm. Porter, barrel 48 00 

Stockbridge, Ladies' Home Miss. Soc, by 
Mrs. C. P. Warner, barrel and freight. . 70 00 

Westboro, Ladies' Sewing Circle, Re- 
ported by Jennie M. Rice, and Susan 
M. Miller, barrel and freight 110 50 

Worcester, Piedmont, Benev. Union, by 
M. P. Shaw, barrel 79 88 



$1,136 50 



Receipts of the Missionary Society of Connecticut, 

in April, Ward W. Jacobs, Treas. 
Bridgeport, Second, by Edward W. 

Marsh $25 00 

Park Street, by F. W. Storrs 29 95 

Derby, Birmingham, J. Tomlinson, per- 
sonal 10 00 

Fairfield, Greenfield, by N. B. Hill 24 66 

parmington, by Frederick C. Jones 51 41 

Haddam, First, by Edward W. Hazen .... 22 22 
Hartford, Pearl Street, Y. P. S. C. E., by 
Miss Lillian A. Andrews, for debt of A. 

H.M.S 100 00 

Asylum Hill, A Friend, by Chas. E. 

Thompson 5 00 

Windsor Ave., Y. P. S. C. E., for debt 

of A. H.M.S 3 00 

Madison, North Madison, by Rev. W. E. 

B. Moore 16 00 

Manchester, by A. L. Spencer 10 oo 

New Haven, College Street, by Samuel 

Lloyd 136 27 

D wight Place, Mary E. Baldwin, per- 
sonal, by Rev. J. E Twitchell 200 00 

Newington, by H. M. Robbins, $42.83; 
Mrs. M. E. fl. Belden, personal, to 
const. Miss Mary E. Belden and Joshua 
Belden, of Newington, Cr., L. Ms., $10u 142 S3 

Putnam, Second, by H. N. Fenn 13 64 

Salem, by Rev. Jairus Oidway 27 50 

Seymour, by E. A. Lum 15 40 

Stafford, Staffordville, by Sidney Smith, 

for debt of A. H. M. S 5 00 

Thomaston, oy P. Darrow 47 31 

Wethersfleld, by S. F. Willard 100 43 

$990 62 



Receipts of the Illinois Home Missionary Society, in 
March, 1887, AARON B. Mead, Treas. 

Alton $500 

Amboy 50 °° 

Ashkum, Woman's Miss. Soc, 45 cents; 
Junior Miss. Soc, 90 cents; unknown, 

ffio 5() 3 85 

Aurora, New England 32 76 

Avon, Mrs. E. C. Churchill 10 00 

Batavia, $18.70 ; For the Debt, $21.87 40 57 

Big Rock, M»s Rae Jones's Sunday- 
school class, $12; special, $5; special, 

$4.07 21 07 

Bowmanville 1* 50 

Brighton, F. Stewart 5 00 

Brimfleld, Mrs. E. W r . Jenney, $2 ; Rev. 

S. R. Thrall, $l 3 00 

Bristol 1 

Bunker Will',' W. H. M. U., for the Debt. . 27 ou 

Byron 16 60 

Canton, $64.90; for the Debt, $20.08 84 98 

Carpentersville, special 10 00 

Chebause, W. H. M. U 4 50 

Chenoa, special ■ • • loo ou 

Chicago, First, $37.50; D. S. Munger,$10; 

Mrs. E. Clark, $5 ; J. K. Harmon, $100. 152 50 

Plymouth, Ladies' Aid Soc 100 00 

South t15 00 

Lake View 5 40 

Church of the Redeemer 15 00 



Crete, for the Debt 

Dan vers 

Dongola, special 

Dover, Ladies' Miss. Soc 

Dwignt, special 

Earlville, " J. A. D." 

Elgin, First 

Elmwood, H. Binnian, for the Debt 

Emington 

Englewood, First. W. H. M. U., $50; 

Sunday-school, $35.12 

North, specal 

Farmingron, J. W. Newell, $25; for the 

Debt,$25 

Mrs. L. I. Richards 

Forrest, special 

Galesburg, First Cong 

Galva 

Gap Grove, $14 ; Abijah Powers, $100 

Godfrey 

Greenville 

Hamilton 

Harvard, $2.80 ; Young People's Society, 



Hinsdale 

Woman's Miss. Soc. 

Mrs. §arah L. Kennedy. 

Illini. 



La Harpe 

La Motile 

La Salle 

Lockport, $7.37 ; W. A. Palmer, $2 

Loda, Woman's Miss. Soc 

Marseilles, John Q. Adams 

Mattoon 

Maywood, add'l 

Melville.. 

Mendota, A. C. Tower, special, $5 ; M. S. 

Tinker, special $1 

Millburn, special 

Morton, Ladies' Miss. Soc, $15.75 ; S. S. 

Birthday Box, $6 

Nora, G. N. Warner 

Mrs. Champlin and Miss Orvis 

Oak Park, $292.75; Ladies' Ben-jvolent 

SDC, $5 

Olney, special 

Ooeida 

Ottawa, Dea. J. G. Nattinger 

Park Ridge 

Paxton 

Plainfleld 

Piano 

Prospect Park 

Providence, W. H. M. U. (for the 

Debt) 

Quincy, Joshua Perry 

Ravenswood, Ladies, for the Debt 

Rantoul, A Friend 

Riley, Mrs. Maria J. Sears 

Rio,IraJ. Hall 

Ruck Falls 

Rockf ord, Second, W. H. M. TJ 

For Bohemian Fund 

Roodhouse 

Sterling, Woman's Miss. Society, of which 

for the Debt $5 

Sublette, special 

Summer Hill 

Thawville, Ladies' Miss. Society 

Tiskilwa, George C. Kellogg 

Turner 

Ullin, special 

Victoria, special 

Villa Ridge, Special 

Wataga 

Waukegan, H. E. Partridge 

Waverly 

Woodburn, A. L. Sturgis 

Mrs. A. L. Sturgis (deceased) per A. L. 

Sturgis 

Rev. Thomas Gillespie, M.D , 

Rev. A. Ethridge, special 

A Friend 



$8 00 

25 75 
5 16 

10 00 
86 45 
50 00 
100 00 

5 00 
10 00 

85 12 

19 56 

50 00 
10 00 

26 00 
40 00 

20 65 
114 00 

19 30 

20 00 
7 75 

7 80 
44 55 

13 40 
50 00 
17 76 

22 80 

20 00 
9 40 
9 37 

6 00 

25 00 

8 00 
1 00 
3 00 

6 00 

26 51 

21 75 

10 00 

5 00 

297 75 

23 30 

11 75 
10 00 

15 00 

20 25 

14 00 

6 00 
13 00 

1 00 

5 00 

10 25 
25 00 

5 00 
5 0.0 
39 00 
57 00 
29 10 

9 00 

13 30 

11 45 
10 40 

4 00 

5 00 

6 65 

21 60 
42 46 

9 35 

16 75 
5 00 

55 30 
10 00 

50 00 
5 00 

10 00 
3 00 



$2,725 47 



THE HOMF. MISSIONARY. 




(LIC^TJIXD) 



A preparation of the phosphates of lime, magnesia, potash and iron with phosphoric acid 
n such form as to be readily assimilated by the system. 

Prepared according to the directions of Prof. E. N. Horsford, of Cambridge. Mass. 

FOR DYSPEPSIA, 

•Mental and Physical Exhaustion^ Weakened En- 

erglh Nervousness, Indigestion, Etc. 

Universally recommended and prescribed by physicians of all schools. Its action will 
Harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. 



It is the best tonic known, furnishing sustenance to both brain and body 
delicious drink with water and sugar only. 



It makes a 



Invigorating. Strengthening, Healthful, Refreshing. 

rnces reasonable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free. Manufactured by the 

Rumford Chemical Works, Providence, R. I. 
s@r BEWARE OF IMiTATiONS!^ 



DEA F.— A very interesting 80-pafre book on Deaf- 
ness, Noises in the Head, otc. How relieved 



free. 



Sent 
Address Nicholson, 177 McDouurall St., N. Y. 



Cincinnati bellFoundry Go 



SUCCESSORS IN* BtYMYER BELLS TO THE 

"BLYMYER MANUFACTURING CO 

CATALOGUE WITH 1800 TESTIMONIALS. 

2EEE5ES3IiMIQa2Ea 



To wear the perfect-fitting 

1GOOD SENSE 

CORDED 

CORSET WAIST 

and when she becomes 

A BEAUTIFUL WOMAN 

enjoying good health, she will then be 
euro to wear them. 
FITS ALL. AGES— Infants to Adults. 
t&~ Every one recommends iheui. 

S S<? D LEADING RETAILERS 

I Everywhere. KWBe sure your corset is 
stamped "GOOD SENSE." Take 
lUO other. Send for descriptive circular. 

_ FERRIS BROS. Manufacturers) 
'—- 341 BroatHvay, NEW YORK. 

MARSHALL FIELD & CO. CHICAGO, 

WHOLESALE WESTERN A«ENT8. ' 



THE INDEPENDENT will be 

pleased to send a free specimen copy to 
any one sending a postal card, address to 
P.-O. Box -2787, New York. 



NOTICE 



TO 



4 




All letters, 1 " orders or com- 
munications in reference to 
advertising in The Home 
Mission a ry, should be ad- 
dressed to H. S. Chandler, 
Advertising Manager, No. 251 
Broadway, New York. 



THE HOME MISSIONABY. 



THE 



UNITED STATES 

Life Insurance Company, 

I1V THE CITY OE NEW YORK. 
(Organized in 1850.) 

261, 262 and 263 BROADWAY, 

New York, 



OEO. H. BURFORD, President. 
C. I*. FRALEIGH, Secretary. 

A. WHEELWRIGHT, Ass't See. 



All Policies henceforth issued are incontestable for any cause 
after three years. 

Death Claims paid at once as soon as satisfactory proofs are 
received at the Home Office. 

Absolute Security, combined with the largest liberality, assures 
the popularity and success of this Company. 



ALL FORMS OF TONTINE POLICIES ISSUED. 



THE HOME MISSIONAEY. 



TIIE 



Mutual Life Insurance Co 

OF NEW YORK, 
RICHARD A. McCURDY, President, 



Is not only the largest Life Insurance Company in 
the world, but has always been the pioneer In all 
matters tending to the popularizing and spreadin; 
of life insurance and Its benefits. 

Its new Distribution Policies are most liberal in 
their terms to policy-holders, and are practically 
unencumbered with restrictions as to occupation, 
residence and travel. 

Policies are payable upon presentation of satis- 
factory proofs of death. 

The Mutual Life Insurance Company's policy 
says to the insured, in plain and simple terms : 
' Pay your premiums, and the person designated by 
you will receive the amount named in this policy 
at your death." This promise is guaranteed by 
gross assets of 

0T 14,181,963, 

which are nearly $14,000,000 in excess of the sum re 
quired under the provisions of the laws of the 
State of New York to meet its liabilities. 

The Mutual Life Insurance Company is a purely 
mutual company. There are no stockholders to ab- 
sorb profits. Every dollar of profits is divided 
among policy-holders, each of whom is a partner 
with equal proportionate rights in over $114, 
000,000. 

Profits distributed among members in the last 
ten years: 

$34,099,475. 

Total payments to policy-holders during same 
period, over 

$243,000,000. 

The following examples of 

Wonderful Results 
of insurance in the Mutual Life Insurance Com 
pany are given for the careful consideration of in 
tending insurers. 

The late Ezra Wheeler, a prominent merchant of 
New York City, became insured in the Mutual Life 
in May, 1S53. For over thirty years he paid his an- 
nual premium in full, and his dividends were 
credited to the policy in the form of additions, ac- 
cording to the following statements: 
Policy No. 11.798. 

Amount, $5,000. Annual premium, $183.05. 

Five-year pe- 
riod ending Additions. 

1858 $616 16 

ISC3 1,259 59 

1868 1,31189 

1873 1,369 32 

1S7S 1,317 114 

1883 1,318 00 

1885 (two years) 538 00 

Post-Mortem Dividend 109 00 

Total Additions 7,889 (JO 

Face«of Policy 5,000 00 

Total Claim Paid $14,839 00 

Total Premiums 6,040 65 



Paid by the Company in excess of 
Premiums received $6,798 35 

Since 1875 the annual cash dividend on this policy 
was uniformly larger than the annual premium, 
jhus matins the policy self-sustaining. 



FIVE PER CENT. COMPOUND 
INTEREST. 

Two Endowment Claims Lately 
Paid. 

Secret of the Mutual's Prosperity. 

In 1S71 a well-known merchant of New York City, 
invested the sum of $3,025.92, as a single premium, 
in the purchase of two 15-year endowment policies 
in the Mutual Life Insurance Company, each for 
the sum of $3,100. The policies were paid on Sep- 
tember 11th, 1883, and the amount which the owner 
received from them was $7,956.34, additions having 
been credited according to the following state- 
ment. 

Policies Nos. 124,175 and 124,176. 

Period ending. Additions. 

1876 $603 64 

1881 626 :;;; 

1886 526 34 



Total additions $1,756 34 

Face of policies 6,200 00 



Total amount received $7,956 34 

This investment realized over FIVE PER CENT. 
COMPOUND INTEREST, besides insurance pro- 
tection for 15 years. 

The following shows the growth of the Mutual 
Life Insurance Company of New Y r ork during the 
past ten years: 

Assets. Pre- New In- 

miums surance. 

1877 $84,749,807 $14,030,153 $20,491,920 

1878 80,633,34(1 13,092,719 28,299,818 

1879 88.212,700 12,687,881 38,394,554 

1S-I1 91 ,529,754 12,275,589 33,700,759 

1881 94,506,498 12,193,024 34,7ni,755 

1882 97,740,303 12,845,592 37,234,45k 

1883 100,912,245 13.457,928 37,820,597 

1884 103,583,301 13,850,258 34/87,989 

1885 108.431,779 14,768,901 40.54k.894 

1880 114,181,96;-; 15,034,720 56,832,71s 

There is no company in existence that has shown 
results so profitable to the policy-holder as the Mu- 
tual Life Company of New York, and no other com- 
pany can or does conduct business at so low a cost. 
The result is that the policy-holders get the profits. 

The following table shows the amounts received 
by the Mutual from policy-holders during the last 
ten years, as well as those returned: 

Pnid to policy-hold- 
ers jor death 
claims, endmv- 
Amonnt re- merits and pur- 
er i red from chased insurances 
policy-holders, and dividends. 

1877 $14,030,153 41 $13,949,100 48 

1878 13,092,719 83 14,400,032 13 

1879 12,1*7,881 72 14,015,555 48 

1880 12,275,589 16 13,160,694 40 

1881 12,196,624 62 12,640,112 12 

1882 12,845.592 80 12,848,835 24 

1.883 l;-;,4."6 ,928 44 13,959,3n() 51 

1884 13,8.50,258 43 13,923,062 19 

188.5 14,738,90193 14,402,049 

1880 15,034,720 66 13,129,103 74 



$134,840,371 06 $136,427,900 25 

The amount returned is 101 per cent, of that re- 
ceived. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



MASON & HAMLIN MASON & HAMLIN 



IMPROVED 

UPRIGHT PIANOS, 

With ttieir Improved Metbofl of Stringing 

PATENTED JULY 24th 1883. 

OHAKACTER1ZED BY 

BRIGHTEST, 1'UKEST TONE*, 

GREATEST DURABILITY, 
IMPROVED METHOD OF STRINGING. 

The Strings beings directly secured to the 
iron trame by metal fastenings will not re. 
quire tuning one-quarter as often as 
Pianos on the old system. 

This new mode of Piano construction invented 
by Mason & Hamlin in 1882, has been fully proved, 
many excellent experts pronouncing it the "great- 
est improvement made in pianos of th3 century." 

WARttAINT. Each Piano will be accom- 
panied by the fullest warrant. Determined 
to achieve Ibe very highest reputation for 
their pianofortes, should defect develop 
itself in any one, the I'ompany will be more 
eager to correct it than the purchaser can 
be to have tbem. 

Pianos can be rented if preferred, at moderate 
cost, with privileg-e of purchase. 



ORGANS. 



^J^J-a 



WORLo 




THE WHOLE WORLD says: 
At every Great World's Exhibition since 1867, these 

organs have be^n awarded the Highest Honors 
Supplied to Her Majesty Queen Victoria. 
Used in Westminster Abbey. 
Used in St. James's Hall. 
Always used by Mr. Ira D Sankey, 

After having used aMason&Hamlin'Organ digbt 
years at Corinco Island, off the western coast of 
Equatorial Africa, the Rev. CD. Heer, Missionary 
writes : 

"This istbe onlv organ. American or European, 
that has not gone to pieces within six months of 
its arrival." 

100 Styles, $22 to $900. Catalogues free. 



MASON & HAMLIN Organ and Piano Co. 

BOSTON, 154 TREMONT STREET; NEW YORK. 46 EAST 14TH ST 
(UNION SQUARE) CHICAGO, 149 WABASH AVE. 

THE "MANHATTAN" 

OF NEW YORK, 

IS 6 and IS 8 Broadway, 



" All men think all men mortal but themselves," but there is nothing like a spe 
of sickness to shake one's confidence in the stability of his health and the permanency of 
physical life. We seem somehow to entertain (vaguely, it may be) the idea that life 
insurance may be very properly safely deferred until there are premonitions of declining 
health. This is like waiting for a fire to occur iu your neighborhood and then running to 
ssek fire insurance when the conflagration is threatening your own house. It is too late 
then to get insurance. The bitter reflection: "It might have been," may then be timely 
enough ; but wishes have no power on that day to evoke from the ashes the presence of the 
protective policy to restore the property lost by our folly. 

Take insurance on your life flow. The new plan of the Manhattan will not only cover 
the contingency of death, but be a saving fund for yourself, to be resorted to in your ad- 
vanced age. 

JAMES M. McLEAN, President. 



J. L. HALSEY, 1st Vice-Prest. 
E. Y. WEMPLE, Secretary. 



H. B. STOKES, 2d Vice-Prest. 
S. N. STEBBINS, Actuary. 



AGENTS WANTED. — Active, reliable, and persevering men who desire agencies in the 
State of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, and Miesouii are invited to 
correspond with the company direct. 



THE wIOME MISSIONARY. 

This Monthly is furnished at sixty cents a year, postage paid. The subscription price 
oould not well be less. Its whole present issue should go to actual subscribers. But, unless they 
prefer to pay, it will be sent free, as heretofore, to Life Directors and Life Members ; Mis- 
sionaries of the Society and its Auxiliaries ; Ministers securing a yearly collection for it in 
their congregations ; also, to every individual, Association, or Congregation, one copy for 
every ten dollars collected and paid over to the Society or an Auxiliary. Suitable name 
should accompany the payment. Pastors are earnestly requested to serve Home Missions by 
promoting the use of this Journal at the Monthly Concert and among their people. 

Immediate notice of the discontinuance or change of post-office address should be given. 

APPLICATIONS FOR AII>. 

Congregations desiring aid should apply at once after finding a minister. They should 
make a full statement of the facts in their condition and prospects which justify an applica- 
tion. They should also give these particulars, viz. : 

Population of the place. 

Names of the church or churches, and preaching stations 

Number of church-members. 

Average of congregation. 

Denomination and size of contiguous congregations. 

Names and distances of the nearest Congregational churches. 

Minister's full name and post-office address : Town, County, State 

Does he reside on his field of labor? Is he installed pastor? 

Has he any other calling than that of the ministry? 

Of what local church is he a member ? 

Of what Ministerial Association ? 

The number of persons composing his family 

Total amount of salary proposed. 

Amount pledged by the people and how secured. 

Has he, also, the use of a parsonage ? 

Is aid expected from any other source ? 

The least amount that will suffice from the A. H. M. S. 

The amount received from this Society last year. 

Will less probably be needed next year? 

Amount contributed to this Society last year. How raised. 

Amount contributed to other benevolent societies. 

Additional statements concerning the condition, prospects, and wants of the field. 

Date of the desired commission. 

The application must be signed by the officers of the church, where there is one, and by 
the trustees or a committee of the congregation. 

If the ecclesiastical body, within whose limits the congregation is found, has a " Com- 
mittee of Missions," the members of that committee should certify these statements, the stand- 
ing of the minister, his prospects of unefulness there, and indorse the application. If no 
such " Committee of Missions " exists, the application should be indorsed by two or more 
neighboring clergymen acquainted with the facts. If no church or congregation is yet 
athered, applicants will follow the same course, as far as practicable. 

Applications, after being so indorsed, should be sent to the Superintendent (or Secretary 
of the Auxiliary) for the region where the applicants reside. 

Appropriations, as a rule, bear the date of a punctual application ; and they never cover 
more than one year. If further aid be needed, a new application is required, containing al 
the particulars named above, and indorsed as before. To this (he certificate of the missionary 
that the congregation has fulfilled its previous pledges for his support, must be added. 

For the address of Superintendents and Secretaries of Auxiliaries, see p. 4 of cover. 

FORM OF A BEQUEST. 

I bequeath to my executors the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay over the same 

after my decease, to the person who, when the same is payable, shall ac 
as Treasurer of the American Home Missionary Society, formed in the City of New York, m 
the year eighteenTtmndred and twenty-six, to bo applied tc the charitable uses and purposes of 
slid Society, and under its direction. 



JXJ1VE, 



lSS?'. 



AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 

Bible House, Astor Place, New York. 



Rev. DAVID B. COE, D.D., Honorary Secretary. 

Rev. WALTER M. BARROWS, D.D.,> . . - n A 

Rev. JOSEPH B. CLARK, D. D., } Secretaries for Correspondence. 

Rev. ALEX'R H. CLAPP. D.D., Treasurer. 
Executive Committee :— Mk. JOHN WILEY, Chairman ; Mb. WM. HENRY SMITH ; Rev. WM. M 
TAYLOR, D.D.; MR. CHARLES H. PARSONS; Mr. ALFRED S. BARNES : MR. ALBERT WOODRUFF; 
GEO. P. SHELDON, ESQ.; Rev. JAMES Q. ROBERTS. D.D.; Rev. SAMUEL H. VIRGIN, D.D.; Mr. JO- 
SEPH WILLIAM RICE; Mr HERBERT M. DIXON; Rev. A. J. F.BEHRENDS, D.D. ; Mr. FRAN- 
CIS FLINT; WM. IVES WASHBURN, Esq., Recording See. 

COMMUNICATIONS 

Relating to the general business of the Society may be addressed to either of the Secretaries for 

Correspondence, 
Communications relating to the Woman's Department may be addressed to 

Mrs. H. M. Shelton, Bible House. N. Y. 
Communications relating to the Editorial Department of The Home Missionary, may be addressed to 

Mrs. H. S. Caswell, Bible House, N. Y. 

DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS, 

In Drafts, Cnecks, Registered Letters, or Post-Offlce Orders: also Communications relating to tiie 
businrss matters of The Home Missionary and other Publications of the Society, may be ad- 
dressed to Alex'r H. Clapf, lieasurer, Bible House, Astor Place, New York. 

Post-Offlce Orders should be drawn on STATION D, New York City. 

A Payment of $50 constitutes a Life Member, 

SUPERINTENDENTS. 

Rev. Henri A. Schauffler, Work among Bohemians, Poles, etc., Cleveland, O. 

Rev. George E. Albreoht, Work among Germans, Chicago. 111. 

Rev. M. W. Montgomery, Work among Scandinavians, Minneapolis, Minn. 



Rev. Leroy Warren, 

Rev. S. F. Gale, 
Rev. J. H. Morley, 
Rev. Franklin B. Doe, 
Rev. Addison Blanchard, 

Rev. C. C. Otis. 



Lansing, Mich. | Rev. John L. Maile. 



Ind. 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Topeka, Kan. 

N. Mex. 



Rev. Hiram D. Wiard, 
Rev. H. C. Simmons, 
Rev. C. M. Sanders. 

J. H. Warren, D.D., 
G. H. Atkinson, D.D., 



Seattle, Wash. Ter.— Rev. Geo. A. Hood, 



Omaha, Neb- 
Mitchell, Dak. 
Fargo, No. Dak. 
Denver, Col. 
Salt Lake City, Utah. 
San Francisco, GaL 
Portland. Or. 
Ashland, Wis. 



SECRETARIES 
oe THE 

Rev. Jonathan E. Adams, Secretary, 

John L. Crosby, Esq., Treasurer, 

Bev. Edward H. Greeley, D.D., Secretary, 

Hon. Lyman D. Stevens, Treasurer, 

Bev. Charles S. Smith, Secretary, 

J. C. Emery, Esq., Treasurer, 

Bev. Joshua Coit, Secretary, 

Bev. EpwrN B. Palmer, Treasurer, 

M>win Barrows, Esq., Treasurer, 

Bev. William H. Moore, Secretary, 

"Ward W. Jacobs, Esq., Treasurer, 

)Rev. Charles C. Creegan, D.D., Secretary, 

Alex'r H. Clapp, Treasurer, 

HRev. J. G. Fraser, Secretary. 

<Alex'b H. Clapp, Treasurer, 

Kiev. James Tompkins, Secretary, 

Aaron B. Mead, Esq., Treasurer, 

Bev, T. G. Gbassie. , Secretary. 

B. A. McCollough, Esq., Treasurer, 

Bev. T. O. Douglass, Secretary, 

J. H. Merrill, Esq., Treasurer, 



AND TREASURERS 

AUXILIARIES. 

Maine Miss. Soc, 

it it 

N. Hamp. Home Miss. Soc. 
<< a 

Vermont Dom. " 

<( <« 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, ) 

it it <« r 

Rhode IsVd " « 

II II HI 

Miss. Soc. of Conn., 

«< a 

New Yoi fc H. M. Soc, 

«< 111 M 

Ohio •« " 

a .1 a 

Illinois " " 
<< a <« 

Wis. " " 

<< I* (< 

Iowa " " 



Bangor, Me. 
Bangor, Me. 
, Concord, N. H. 

Concord, N. H. 

Montpelier, Vt. 

Montpelier, Vt. 

22 Cong. House, 

Boston Mass. 

Providence. B. I. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
New York City. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
New York City. 
151 Washington 
St.. Chicago, Id. 
Milwaukee, Wig. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Grinnell, la. 
Des Moines, la. 




Home Missionary. 



JI LV, 188" 



CONTENTS. 



SIXTY-FIRST ANNIVERSARY 

Delegates from State Societies 

Life Members 

Meeting of the Executive Committee.. 
SIXTY-FIRST REPOliT 

Summary of Results 

The Treasury.' 

Comparative Results 

The Woman's Depart merit 

The Sunday-Schools 

Our Publications 

Familv Supplies 

Distribution of Missionaries by Mates. 

Distribution of Missionaries by Sec- 
tions 

General Comparative Results 

Auxiliaries and missionary 

FIELDS 

Maine Missionaiy Society 

Hew Hampshire Home Missionary So- 
ciety 

Vermont Domestic Missionary Society 

Massachusetts Home Missionary So- 
ciety 

Rhode Island Home Missionary Society 

Missionary Society of Connecticut 

New York Home Missionary Society.. 

Eastern Pennsylvania 

Ohio Home .Missionary Society 

Illinois Home Missionary Society 

Wisconsin Home Missionary Society. . 

North Wisconsin ■ ■ ■ 

Iowa Home Missionary Society 

Maryland. District oi Columbia, \ ir- 
ginia, Tennessee, and Georgia 

Florida ■ 

.Missouri. Arkansas, and Indian Terri- 
tory 

Texas anil Louisiana 



mi 

100 

Kin 

1(11 
Kil 

Kl-2 
Hi:, 
105 
L06 
It in 
Kill 
111 
112 
Hi 
113 

11 
118 

l-.-o 
122 



New Mexico and Arizona.. 

Indiana 

Michigi 



Minnesota 

Kansas 

Nebraska ;",v.\;" \\Vi' 

North Nebraska, Black Hills (Dakota 

Ter. i. and Northeast Wyoming 

The Black Hills and East Wyoming 

District 

South Dakota • 

North Dakota and Eastern Montana.. 

Colorado and Fast Wyoming 

Utah, Idaho, West Montana, and 

West Wyoming 

California and Nevada »■ 

( >regon and East Washington 

West Washington • • • • • • • • 

Work anion.-;- Immigrant Population 

--Slavonic Department 

German 1 Jepartment 

Scandinavian Department 

Conclusion 

W( )M AN S DEPARTMENT 

The Fifth Annual Meeting 

A Meeting of the Officers of the 
Woman's State Home Missionary 
Societies 

THE AMERICAN EDUCATION SO- 
CIETY APPOINTS A WESTERN 
SECK FTARY 

WOMAN'S FUND FOR MISSIONARY 
SALARIES 

CHILDREN'S BOHEMIAN FUND.... 

MISSIONARY BOXES 

WOMAN'S STATE H. M. ORGANI- 
ZATIONS 

MISSIONARY APPOINTMENTS 

RECEIPTS 



123 
123 

1:24 
126 

i-2 ; 

1-2S 

129 

130 
131 
132 
133 

133 
134 
135 
137 

138 
140 

in 
145 

lie. 
141) 



149 

151 

152 
152 
152 

152 
153 
153 



Vol. LX. No. 3. 



AMERICAN 



JTBfW YORK. 
HOME MISSIONARY 

Bible House, Astor Place. 



SOCIETY, 



SIXTY CENTS A YEAR. IN ADVANCE, P0STA&E PAID- 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 

Go Preach the Gospel Mark xvi. 15. 

How shall they preach except they be sent ? Rom. x. 15. 



VOL. JjX. JULY, 1887. No. 3. 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



SIXTY-FIRST ANNUAL MEETING 



OF THE 

AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 



The American Home Missionary Society convened for its sixty-first 
annual meeting, in the Methodist Episcopal Church, Saratoga Springs, 
N. Y., at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, June 7th, 1887. 

The President, Rev. Julius H. Seelye, D.D., LL.D., of Massachu- 
setts, called the body to order. 

Devotional services were conducted by Rev. Nehemiah Boynton, of 
Massachusetts. Rev. Frederick A. Noble, D.D., of Illinois, preached 
the Annual Sermon, from Matt, xvi, 3, and Luke xii, 48. 

The Lord's Supper was then administered by Rev. Edward S. At- 
wood, D.D., of Massachusetts, and Rev. Henry A. Stevens, of Rhode 
Island. 

After the benediction, the meeting adjourned till 8:30 a.m., Wednes- 
day. 

Wednesday Morning, June 8th. — At 8:30 the Society spent a half- 
hour in devotion, led by Rev. Lemuel Jones, of Massachusetts. 

At 9 the President took the chair, and prayer was offered by Rev, 
George S. Pelton, of Massachusetts. 

Rev. William H. Moore, of Connecticut, was chosen Assistant Re- 
cording Secretary. 

The President appointed the following committees : 

On the Roll— Rev. William H. Moore, of Connecticut, and Rev. William H. 
Holman, of Connecticut. 

On Business.— Rex. William E. Park, of New York; Rev. Cassius E. 



82 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

Weight, of Minnesota; Rev. S. Fielder Palmer, of New Jersey; Robert L. 
Day, of Massachusetts ; Charles W. Osgood, of Vermont. 

On Nominations. — Rev. James L. Hill, of Massachusetts ; Rev. James H. 
Ross, of Connecticut ; Rev. John G. Fraser, of Ohio ; J. K. Darling, of Vermont. 

On Report of the Executive Committee. — Rev. Edward N. Packard, of New 
York; Rev. S. Lekoy Blake, D.D., of Connecticut ; Rev. Joseph A. Tomlinson 
of Florida. 

On Paper of Secretary Barrows. — Rev. James G. Merrill, D.D., of Missouri; 
Rev. Michael Bcrniiam, of Massachusetts ; Rev. George W. Phillips, of Ver- 
mont ; Rev. George R. Merrill, of Minnesota ; Hon. Amos C. Barstow, of 
Rhode Island. 

On Paper of Secretary Clark. — Samuel B. Capen, of Massachusetts ; John G. 
Haskell, of Kansas ; William F. Whittemore, of Massachusetts ; Francis C. 
Sessions, of Ohio ; David N. Camp, of Connecticut. 

The President made an opening address. Prayer was offered by 
Rev. James Dingwell, of Connecticut. Secretary Barrows read a paper, 
reviewing the work of the Society in its sixty-first year. 

After singing, Secretary Clark presented a paper on the Debt of 
the Society. 

Prayer was offered by Rev. Joseph D. Wickham, D.D., of Vermont. 

After singing, Auxiliary Societies were represented in addresses, as 
follows : The Massachusetts Home Missionary Society by Rev. Joshua 
Coit, Secretary, and by Rev. Calvin E. Amaron ; the Illinois Home Mis- 
sionary Society by Rev. James Tompkins, Secretary; the Iowa Home 
Missionary Society by Rev. Truman O. Douglass, Secretary. 

At 12:30 recess was taken till 3 p.m. 

Wednesday Afternoon. — Met at 3, in the lecture-room of the church. 
Prayer was offered by Rev. J. Jay Dana, of Massachusetts. The Min- 
utes of Tuesday evening and Wednesday morning were approved. 
The Committee on the Roll made a report, which was accepted and 
approved. The Committee were authorized to complete the Roll, 
which, when completed, was as follows : 

Delegates from State 'Societies. 

Connecticut. Florida. -y- York 

Rev. George W. Banks, Rev. Joseph A. Tomlinson. 

Rev. Luther H. Barber, Illinois. Rev ' C * C * Cree S an > DD - 

Rev. Henry M. Hazeltine, Rev . Wash'n A. Nichols, 

William H. Hall, Rev . F . A . Noble) B _ D ^ Vermont. 

Samuel Skinner. R ev . j am es Tompkins, Rev. C. M. Lamson, D.D.. 

Dakota. Mrs. L. L. Watson, Charles W. Osgood. 

Rev. Hiram D. Wiard. Miss Mary C. Townsend. 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



83 



California. 
Rev. John G. Hale. 

Connecticut. 
William II. Allen, 
Edwin P. Angus, 
Charles Bailey, 
Rev. Henry P. Bake, 
Mrs. J. S. Barton, 
George B. Burrall, 
David N. Camp, 
Ellen R. Camp, 
Rev. Andrew C. Denison, 
Rev. James Dingwell, 
Rev. John E. Elliott, 
Mrs. Elizabeth F. Gilbert, 
George W. Gilbert, 
Rev. George J. Harrison, 
Rev. Azel W. Hazen, 
Rev. William H. Holman, 
Rev. Lucius Higgins, 
Erastus Hubbard, 
Mrs. Erastus Hubbard. 
James G. Johnson, D.D., 
Rev. Hiram L. Kelsey, 
S. B. Little, 
Mrs. N. T. Mallett, 
Rev. Sylvanus P. Marvin, 
Rev. William H, Moore, 
Rev. Elbert S. Porter, Jr., 
Rev. Frank C. Potter, 
Mrs. A. K. Reed, 
Rev. William T. Reynolds, 
Mrs. Louisa S. Ritch, 
Thomas Ritch, 
Rev. Henry L. Slack, 
John Waldo, 
Rev. Gowen C. Wilson. 

Maine. 
Rev. Hiram Houston, 

Massachusetts. 
Mrs. A. M. D. Alexander, 
Mrs. C. A. Allis, 
Mrs. E. H. Baker, 
Rev. Robert C. Bell, 
Mrs. E. D. Bement, 
Carrie E. Bowdin, 
Rev. Charles S. Brooks, 
Rev. Albert Bryant, 
Edward W. Capen, 



Life Members. 

Samuel B. Capen, 

Rev. Isaac Clark, 

Rev. Joshua Coit, 

S. M. Cook, 

Rev. John Jay Dana, D.D., 

Mrs. Mark L. Day, 

Mrs. Theodore L. Day, 

Caroline W. Denny, 

Charles A. Denny, 

R. H. Eddy, 

Edwin Eldred, 

Lorenzo Eldred, 

Mrs. A. A. Ellsworth, 

Miss F. M. Ellsworth, 

Rev. John L. Ewell, 

J. W. Field, 

Rev. Edward J. Giddings, 

Miss Jennie G. Gleason, 

Rev. Henry M. Grant, 

Elnathan Graves, 

Mrs. A. Harlow, 

Mrs. J. F. Hayward, 

Rev. Allen Hazen, 

Rev. Henry A. Hazen, 

Rev. Timothy A. Hazen, 

Rev. Rufus P. Hibbard, 

Sarah A. Hibbard, 

Rev. James L. Hill, 

Edmund Hobart, 

Rev. Martin S. Howard, 

Rev. J. G. Johnson, D.D., 

Loring Johnson, 

G. A. Kress, 

Rev. E. H. Knight, 

Rev. James H. Laird, 

Rev. James P. Lane, 

Mrs. Manning Leonard, 

Rev. Archibald L. Love, 

John Lowe, 

Mrs. John Lowe, 

Rev. John N. Lowell, 

Rev. Payson W. Lyman, 

Homer Merriam, 

Mrs. Lewis Merriam, 

Mrs. P. S. Munson, 

Rev. Edward 1ST. Packard, 

Rev. George. S. Pelton, 

W. A. De Pew, 

Mrs. L. B. Ruddock, 

Ezra Sawyer, 

W. H. Sawyer, 



Mrs. W. II. Sawyer, 
William II. Seagrave, 
Rev.J.H.Seelye,D.D.,LL.D 
J. H. Shedd, 
Lucy E. Shedd, 
Agnes F. Smith, 
Joseph M. Smith, 
Mrs. S. E. Sprague,, 
C. W. Stebbins, 
Rufus M. Taft, 
Mrs. Rufus M. Taft, 
Mrs. J. M. E. Taylor, 
Miss M. C. Thompson, 
Rev. Alfred E. Tracy, 
Benjamin A. Tripp, 
Mrs. Benjamin A. Tripp, 
Elmer G. Tucker, 
George E. Tucker, 
Rev. A. S. Walker, D.D., 
Levi Wallace, 
David W. Whitcomb, 
Harry E. Whitcomb, 
Rev. Lyman Whiting, D.D., 
Samuel C. Wilkins, 
Rev. W. W. Winchester, 
Rev. John Wood, 
Mrs. John Wood, 
Rev. Robert M. Wood. 

Minnesota, 
Rev. Eugene F. Hunt, 
Rev. George R. Merrill, 
Rev. Cassius E. Wright. 

Missouri. 
Rev. J. G. Merrill, D.D. 

Nebraska. 
Rev. Harmon Bross. 
New Hampshire. 
C M. Burnham, 
Henry Kent, 

New Jersey. 

J. H. Denison, 

J. E. Janes, 

Rev. J. E. Rankin, D.D., 

Rev. Wm. H. Ward, D.D., 

John Wiley. 

New York. 
Rev. L. Abbott, D.D.. 



84 



THE HOME MISSIOYARY. 



July, 



Rev. Marshall B. Angier, 
Marshall Ayres, 
Rev. Jabez Backus, 
Mrs. J. K. Bancroft, 
Rev. W. M. Barrows, D.D. 
Rev. LeviH. Cobb, D.D., 
Rev. J. B. Clark, D.D., 
Rev. Alex. H. Clapp, D.D. 
Rev. David B. Coe, D.D., 
Rev. Charles A. Conant, 
Herbert M Dixon, 
Rev. A. C. Frissell, 
Rev. Samuel Johnson, 



Rev. John H. Munsell, 
Rev. William E. Park. 
J. V. Place, 
Mrs. J. V. Place, 
Mrs. U. M. Place, 
Rev. J. G. Roberts, D.D. 
Rev. Charles J. Ryder, 
Rev. Albert L. Smalley, 



Francis C. Sessions. 
Rhode Island. 
Amos C. Barstow, 
Rev. James H. Lyon, 
J. G. Parkhurst, 
Rev. Jeremiah Taylor,D.D. 

Vermont. 
Edward H. Board man, 



Rev. ¥m. S. Smart, D.D., Samuel Boardman, 



D. W. Smith, 
Mrs. D. W. Smith, 
William Henry Smith, 
Wayland Spaulding, 



Mrs. (Rev.) Sam'l Johnson, Rev. Josiah Strong, D.D. 
Rev. William Kincaid, Ohio. 

Dr. Joseph F. Land, Rev. John G. Fraser, 

Mrs. S. A. Lombard, W. A. Mahony, 



Rev. Nathan F. Carter, 
Rev. Henry Fairbanks, 
Rev. S. P. Giddings, 
Rev. Edward Hawes, D.D., 
L. D. Hazen, 
Dr. N. C. Newell, 
Rev. Milan C. Stebbins, 
Rev. J. D. Wickham, D.D. 



The annual report of the Executive Committee was presented and 
referred to its appropriate Committee. 

It was voted, that the thanks of the Society be presented to Rev. 
Frederick A. Noble, D.D., of Illinois, for his able and eloquent dis- 
course, and that a copy be requested for publication. 

Article VI. of the Constitution w r as amended by inserting, after the 
first sentence, the words: " Also any person chosen as President, Vice- 
President, Recording Secretary, Assistant Recording Secretary, Audi- 
tor, Corresponding Secretary, Treasurer, or member of the Executive 
Committee, shall be a member during the term of his service." 

The following resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That whereas the relation of the Auxiliaries to this National Society 
is so close, and the conditions of that relationship require that all surplus money 
in auxiliary treasuries be forwarded to the National treasury, therefore it is de- 
sirable that all gifts from churches and individuals for Home Missions be made to 
the State Societies, or through their treasuries by designation to the National 
Society. 

The Executive Committee having been instructed at the annual 
meeting in 1886, " To take steps for the removal of any existing legal 
impediments which debar the Society from holding its annual meetings 
wherever it may choose to direct," reported that said impediments 
cannot be removed, and that the annual meetings must be held 
within the State of New York. This report was accepted and arjproved, 
and it was 

Voted, That the next annual meeting of this Society be held in Saratoga, com- 
mencing at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, June 5th, 1888, at a place to be named by the 
Executive Committee in the call for said meeting. 

The officers of the American Home Missionary Society having been 
requested, at the last annual meeting, "To complete the statistics 



1887. the home missionary. 



85 



bearing on the subject of interference between denominations in our 
Home Missionary work," reported progress, and the duty was assigned 
to them for the ensuing year. 

The Committee, " In relation to the appointment of a Secretary for 
the work in cities," made a report, which was laid upon the table. 

The Nominating Committee reported officers for the ensuing year, 
who were elected, as follows : 

PRESIDENT. 
Rev. Julius II. Bbblte, D.D., LL.D., of Massachusetts. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS. 
Rev. James II. Faikoiiild, D.D., of Ohio. 
Hon. Horace Fairbanks, of Vermont. 
Hon. Joseph R. Hawley, of Connecticut. 
Rev. Edwin B. Webb, D.D., of Massachusetts. 
Rev. Andrew L. Stone, D.D., of California. 
Rev. Edward P. Goodwin, D.D., of Illinois. 
Rev. James G. Merrill, D.D., of Missouri. 
Austin Abbott, of New York. 
Hon. Charles I. Walker, of Michigan. 
Rev. Zaohary Eddy, D.D., of Georgia. 

RECORDING SECRETARY. 
Rev. William H. Holman, of Connecticut. 

AUDITOR. 
George S. Coe, of New York. 

! EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

FOR THREE YEARS, 1887-90. 

John Wiley, Orange, N. J. 

Rev. Samuel H. Virgin, D.D., New York, N. Y. 

Herbert M. Dixon, Smyrna, N. Y. 

George P. Sheldon, Greenwich, Ct. 

Rev. Robert R. Meredith, D.D., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

At 5 recess was taken till 7:30. 

Wednesday Evening. — Met at 7:30 in the church. After singing, and 
prayer by Prof. G. Frederick Wright, D.D., of Ohio, the report of the 
Committee on the Work in Cities was taken from the table. Ad- 
dresses were made by Rev. Josiah Strong, D.D., of New York ; Rev. 
Lyman Abbott, D.D., of New York; Rev. James G. Johnson, D.D., of 
Connecticut : and the President ; and the recommendations of the re- 
port were adopted, as follows : 

I. It is not wise for this meeting to direct the appointment of a new Secre- 
tary for the work in cities. Whenever the necessities of the work require, and 
the funds of the Society justify, the appointment of a new Secretary, the defining 
of his department, and the adjustment of his work to that of the other Secretaries 
should be left to the Executive Committee. 



86 THE HOME MISSIONARY. Juty 

II. The Society and its Auxiliaries are already employing evangelists. They 
have, during the past year, employed thirty-five, with good results. Your Com- 
mittee recommend the continuance and enlargement of this work. 

III. The Christian! zation of our great cities cannot be accomplished by mis- 
sion chapels and evangelistic services. Churches should be established in church- 
less wards— churches which will be composed of Christian families, and will pro- 
mote Christian family life. 

IV. Such churches cannot be, for a long time to come, self-supporting ; they 
must be helped by their more prosperous neighbors. The work is a foreign mis- 
sionary work on home soil, and as such must be maintained. This is not a work of 
church extension; it means a continuous drain upon our sympathy and our purse. 

V. The work ought to be carried on undenominationally. It must be carried 
on denominationally — by denominational methods and organizations. In the 
present state of Protestant Christendom, undenominational churches cannot be 
maintained. 

VI. The churches in each city should assume the responsibility for the evan- 
gelization of that city. The American Home Missionary Society should assume 
only the responsibility of giving to them necessary aid, and as it is needed. 

VII. Our theological seminaries cannot, by their present methods, supply the 
men. For the work of city evangelization, we need at once men for this work, men 
who have come from the people to whom they are to speak; and we, therefore, 
need schools for the education of such preachers, either in connection with theo- 
logical schools, as at Oberlin and Chicago, or separate therefrom. 

At 9 the body adjourned until 8:30 a.m., Thursday, June 9th. 

Thursday Morning, June 9th. — At 8:30 the Society spent a half-hour 
in devotion, led by Rev. Charles R. Seymour, of Massachusetts. 

The hour from 9 to 10 was occupied by the American Congregational 
Union, President Seelye in the chair. After singing, and prayer by 
Rev. Willard Scott, of Nebraska, addresses were made by Rev. Levi H. 
Cobb, D.D., of New York, Secretary; Rev. James G. Roberts, D.D., of 
New York ; and Rev. William G. Puddefoot, of Michigan. 

At 10, after singing, and prayer by Rev. Edward P. Hammond, of 
Connecticut, the Committee on the Paper of Secretary Barrows, pre- 
sented a report, which, after addresses by Rev. James G. Merrill, of 
Missouri, and Rev. Michael Burnham, of Massachusetts, was accepted. 

The Committee on the Paper of Secretary Clark presented a report, 
with resolutions. After addresses by Samuel B. Capen, of Massachu- 
setts ; John G. Haskell, of Kansas ; and Rev. Frederick A. Noble, D.D., 
of Illinois, the report was accepted, and the resolutions adopted, as 
follows : 

■1. Resolved, That we approve of the action of the Executive Committee, in its 
efforts to economize its funds by cutting off all doubtful enterprises, and urging 
to self-support all churches upon its lists as rapidly as possible. We recommend 
for the future that the same care be emphasized, and no new churches be en- 
couraged, without showing clearly their right to be, to the end that no criticism 
of waste shall ever be fairly made. 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 87 

2. Resolved, That the statement, made by Becretary Barkows, that the Execu- 
tive Committee has determined to make good as soon as possible the $50,000 
Swett Exigency Fund, meets our heartiest approval. It is a Trust Fund given 
with conditions, which were accepted, and these conditions must be sacredly kept. 

3. Resolved, That we indorse the reported action of the meeting of Secretaries, 
Superintendents, and representatives of Auxiliaries and assisting agencies, in the 
appointment of a committee whose duty it shall be to urge at the next annual 
meeting of the Society, the attendance of a large number of Christian business 
men. We take occasion at this time to invite these men to become familiar with 
the details of the Society's work. We particularly desire them to listen to the re- 
ports of Superintendents and others who have the held work in charge, and ac- 
quire information to the fullest extent, to the end that they may join hands with 
us in this mighty conflict between good and evil. 

4. Resolved, That we recommend that the Executive Committee at once take 
the necessary steps to insure the personal co-operation of a large number of inter- 
ested givers. To this end we suggest the establishment of a " Roll of Honor," 
consisting of such friends of the Society as are willing, in additiaon to Iheir regu- 
lar gifts, to guarantee that in case the annual income of the Society from the gifts 
of the living or from legacies shall in any year fall below the average receipts 
for the preceding five years, then a pro rata assessment shall be made upon the 
members of the Roll for such a percentage of their guarantee pledges as is re- 
quired to restore the treasury to its normal condition. 

5. Resolved, That it shall be the settled policy of this Society to pay its missiona- 
ries and agents their salaries without delay; and, in case of any failure in the regular 
income, its Executive Committee, to accomplish this purpose, shall use every 
bxisiness method to temporarily supply such deficiency. 

6. Resolved,Th?Lt legacies shall be appropriated and expended the year after their 
receipt, to the end that the Society shall always have on hand some resources 
commensurate with its ever enlarging work. 

7. Resolved, That we urge especially in this transition period a great increase in 
the gifts of the living ; that every business man who has the ability be urged to 
put a missionary representative at once upon the front line of battle, and sustain 
him by their money and their prayers. Let the young men in our Seminaries see 
that there is the money back of every man. 

8. Resolved, That the Executive Committee shall plan at once, with any other of 
our Missionary Societies who are willing to co-operate, to reach through the local 
conference, every church of our polity in America, that all may bear their proper 
share in redeeming our land for Christ. 

No more delayed payments; no more dehts ; no more " shirking" churches; 
no more gaps in the line. Our motto for the closing years of the nineteenth 
century: A Sunday-school in every valley, and a church upon every hill-top. 

Addresses upon the work among the Bohemians and Poles were 
made by Rev. Henry A. Schauffler, of Ohio, and John Lewis, of 
Ohio. 

At 12:30 recess was taken till 2 p.m. 

Thursday Afternoon. — At 2, after prayer by Samuel B. Capen, of 
Massachusetts, the Minutes of Wednesday afternoon and evening-, and 
of Thursday morning were approved, and the Recording Secretary was 
authorized to complete the Minutes at the close of the evening session. 



88 THE HOME MISSIONAKY. July, 

After singing, the Congregational Sunday-school and Publishing 
Society was represented in addresses by Rev. Albert E. Dunning, of 
Massachusetts, Secretary ; Rev. William F. McMillen, of Ohio ; Rev. 
Charles C. Creegan, D.D., of New York ; and William A. Duncan, of 
New York. 

After singing, addresses were made by the following representatives 
from the field : Rev. H. DeForest Wiard, of Dakota ; Rev. Harmon 
Bross, of Dakota ; Rev. Clarendon M. Sanders, of Colorado ; Rev. 
George M. Sanborne, of Arkansas ; Rev. George A. Hood, of Wisconsin; 
Rev. James T. Ford, of Southern California ; and Rev. Addison Blanch- 
ard, of Kansas. 

At 5:30 recess was taken till 7:30. 

Thursday Evening. — At 7:30, after singing, and prayer by Rev. 
Payson W. Lyman, of Massachuetts, the Committee on the Report of the 
Executive Committee presented a report, and on their recommendation 
the report of the Executive Committee was approved, and the follow- 
resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That we recognize and most heartily approve of the wisdom of the 
Executive Committee and of our Secretaries in the able management of the 
Society's affairs for the past year ; and that with renewed confidence we intrust 
to their hands the direction of the great and growing work that comes to us, 
pledging our most earnest sympathy and co-operation with our prayers for the 
year to come. 

The following resolution, offered by the Business Committee, was 
adopted : 

Resolved, That the thanks of the American Home Missionary Society are due, 
and are very gladly paid, to the numerous parties who have contributed to the un- 
usual success of this series of meetings. We desire to express our especial 
gratitude to the various railroad companies who have given commutation fares; 
to hotel proprietors and boarding-house keepers, who have allowed special rates 
to attendants on the Society's meetings; to the Trustees of the Methodist Church 
of Saratoga, for the use of their beautiful edifice; to the Century Company for the 
use of a selection from their hymn books ; to Mr. and Mrs. George C. Stebbins for 
taking charge of the music; to the Rev. Junus H. Seelye, D.D., for the able manner 
in which he has presided over the meetings ; to the pastor of the Congregational 
Church of Saratoga Springs, for his efficiency in making the necessary arrange- 
ments for the gathering, and to the ladies of his church and congregation for the 
floral decorations with which they have adorned the church edifice. 

It was voted, That the minutes and the report of the Executive 
Committee, including the papers read by Secretaries Barrows and Clark, 
be printed ; and also other papers, addresses and reports, at the dis- 
cretion of. said Committee. 

Addresses were made by Rev. Willard Scott, of Nebraska ; Rev. 
J. Eames Rankin, D.D., of New Jersey Rev. William Elliot Griffis, 
D.D., of Massachusetts. 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 8^ 

After singing, prayer was offered, and the benediction was pro- 
nounced by Rev Zachary Eddy, D.D., of Georgia, and at 9:15 the meet- 
ing 'was dissolved. 

William H. Holman, 

Recording Secretary. 
William H. Moore, 

Assistant Recording Secretary. 



MEETING OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITEE. 

The Executive Committee met on Tuesday, June 21st, at the Society's 
Rooms, Bible House, Astor Place, N. Y., and duly elected the following Execu- 
tive officers : 

HONORARY SECRETARY: 
Rev. David B. Coe, D.D. 

SECRETARIES FOR CORRESPONDENCE: 
Rev. Walter M. Barrows, D.D., 
Rev. Joseph B. Clark, D.D. 

TREASURER : 
Rev. Alexander H. Clapp, D.D. 



90 THE HOME MISSIONARY. J u ty, 



SIXTY-FIRST REPORT. 



It is the rare privilege of the Executive Committee to report that 
since the sixtieth anniversary, by the goodness of God, death has not 
taken one from their number, nor from that of the elected officers of 
the Society. In this respect the year stands in grateful contrast with 
the preceding, when we were called to star the names of three beloved 
official helpers : Vice-President Goodell, and Messrs. Hutchinson and 
Whittemore, of the Executive Committee. 

Within the year now reported, however, eight — exactly twice the 
number of missionaries who died in active service last year — ceased 
from their labors : Rev. Messrs. Jacob Horton, in Maine ; Robert C. 
Allison and Charles Duren, in Yermont ; Evan Curtis, in Arkansas ; 
John Jones, in Michigan ; Amos Jones, in Kansas ; Spencer R. Wells, 
in Iowa ; Edward T. Hooker, in California. 

To Mr. Duren, ordained in 1841, was given a ministry of forty-six 
years, while to Mr Horton were granted scarcely two years of pastoral 
service. The average working term of the seven the date of whose 
ordination is known, was a little more than twenty years. Twelve of 
the twenty years' ministry of Mr. Wells (who lost an arm at Vicksburg 
in his country's defense) were given to the foreign work in India. 
The remainder were devoted to the West. 

SUMMARY OF RESULTS. 

The number of ministers of the gospel in the service of the Society 
the last year, whose names are found in the General Table in the full 
report, together with those engaged in superintending the work, is 
1,625. (Deducting 54 reported in more than one State, 1,571.) Of 
these, 1,179 were in commission at the date of the last report, and 
392 have since been appointed. 

They have been employed in 41 States and Territories, as follows 
In Maine, 99 ; New Hampshire, 65 ; Vermont, 62 ; Massachusetts, 97 
Rhode Island, 10 ; Connecticut, 50 ; New York, 67 ; New Jersey, 7 
Pennsylvania, 23 ; Maryland, 1 ; District of Columbia, 3 ; Virginia, 2 
West Virginia, 2 ; Georgia, 7 ; Arkansas, 18 ; Florida, 26 ; Texas, 7 
Indian Territory, 15 ; Tennessee, 3 ; Ohio, 38 ; Indiana, 8 ; Illinois, 



18S7. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 91 

61 ; Missouri, 54 ; Mulligan, 123 ; Wisconsin, 56 ; Iowa, 79 ; Minnesota, 
102; Kansas, 105; Nebraska, 113; Dakota, 120; Colorado, 26; Wy- 
oming, 11 ; Montana, 5 ; New Mexico, 14 ; Utah, 13 ; Nevada, 1 ; Idaho, 
1 ; Arizona, 4 ; California, 76 ; Oregon, 13 ; Washington Territory, 38 ; 
in all, 1,625. Of these 54, having labored in more than one State, are 
in this enumeration twice counted. The total number of individual 
missionaries employed is 1,571. 

This distribution, retaining the twice counted, gives to the New 
England States, 383 ; Middle States, 101 ; Southern States, 41 ; South- 
western States, 112; on the Pacific Coast,. 127; Western States and 
Territories, 861. 

Of the whole number in commission, 748 have been pastors or stated 
supplies of single congregations ; 554 have ministered to two or three 
congregations each ; and 269 have extended their labors over still wider 
fields. 

The aggregate of ministerial labor performed is 1,117 years. 

The number of congregations and missionary districts which have 
been fully supplied, or where the gospel has been preached at stated 
intervals, is 3,063. 

Five missionaries have been in commission as pastors or stated sup- 
plies of congregations of colored people, and 136 have preached in 
foreign languages : 29 to Welsh congregations ; 40 to German congre- 
gations ; 37 to Scandinavian congregations ; 1 to Dane congregation ; 
14 to Bohemian congregations ; 1 to Armenian congregations ; 1 to 
Spanish congregations ; 2 to Chinese congregations; 1 to Indian con- 
gregations ; 7 to French congregations ; and 3 to Mexican congrega- 
tions. 

The number of Sunday-school and Bible- class scholars is not far 
from 130,000. The organization of 323 new schools is reported, and 
the number under the special care of missionaries is 2,188. 

The contributions to benevolent objects, reported by 806 mission- 
aries, amount to $36,309.29. 

One hundred and seventy-eight missionaries make mention of 
revivals of religion during the year, some of them reporting 90, 76, 75, 
73, 65, 62, 60, 57, 52, 50 and 45 hopeful conversions. In 239 instances 
the number of reported converts exceeds 10, and the number reported 
by 670 missionaries is 8,056. 

The additions to the churches, as nearly as can be ascertained, have 
been 10,031 — viz.: 6,469 on confession of faith, and 3,562 by letters from 
other churches. 

One hundred and thirty-five churches have been organized, in con- 
nection with the labors of the missionaries, within the year, and 63 have 
assumed the entire support of their own gospel ordinances. 



92 



THE HOME MISSIONABY. ^Tlly, 



One hundred and twelve houses of worship have been completed ; 
170 materially repaired or improved, and the building- of many others 
commenced. Sixteen chapels are reported as having been built within 
the year, and 39 parsonages have been provided. Seventy-six young 
men, in connection with the missionary churches, are reported as in dif- 
ferent stages of preparation for the gospel ministry. 

THE TREASURY. 

Resoukces. — The balance in the Treasury, April 1st, 1886, was 
$27,165.08, including the Swett Fund of $25,000. The receipts for the 
succeeding twelve months have been $482,979.60 ; making the resources 
for the year $510,144.68. 

Liabilities. — There was due to missionaries, at the close of last year, 
$4,102.73. There has since become due $508,639.09, making the total 
liabilities $512,741.82. 

Payments. — Of this sum, $507,988.79 have been paid, leaving $4,- 
753.03 still due to the missionaries for labor performed. In addition 
to these past dues, appropriations already made, and daily becoming 
due amount to $51,631.51; making the total of pledges $56,384.54; 
toward canceling which there was a balance in the Treasury, March 
31st, of $2,155.89. 

COMPARATIVE RESULTS. 

This comprehensive survey shows that in many important respects 
the year's successes were such as call for special thanksgiving to him 
in whose strength the work was done. We cannot be greatly depressed 
even by the falling off of $41,565.33 in cash receipts — due to the very 
unusual decrease of legacies — when we see that the gifts of the living 
have exceeded those of the previous year by $70,612.69, showing that 
the practical interest of the Society's constituency not only abides, but 
is growing more rapidly than ever before. The number of commis- 
sioned workers is larger by 102 than last year. The number of years 
of labor is greater by 59 ; that of churches and preaching stations 
regularly served, is greater by 58 ; 941 more conversions are reported ; 
981 more than last year were added to the churches ; 827 more joined 
on confession of faith. Nearly 10,000 more scholars have been gathered 
into Sunday-schools and Bible-classes under the missionaries' care. In 
these and many other particulars surely there is matter for gratitude, 
for encouragement, and for quickening to still more earnest effort all 
those who pray and give and toil for our country's evangelization. 

THE WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT. 

Fifteen State Auxiliaries are now intelligently and actively at work, 
combining, systematizing and quickening the forces of hundreds of 
smaller local organizations in each of these States, in behalf of Home 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 93 

Missions. Other States are proposing soon to organize, the Christian 
ladies in their churches working, praying and giving with a zeal that 
is full of promise. The fruits of both the organized and unorganized 
work of women have been seen in their steady contributions through the 
year, and especially in their generous response to the Society's appeals 
when struggling under that oppressive load of debt, the lifting off of 
which has made the year so memorable. Among the sharers in that 
grand work are the names of "honorable women not a few"; and the 
amount of their individual and associated offerings, could it be known, 
with the personal sacrifice and self-denial that it cost in many cases, 
would humble the self-esteem and put to shame the giving of many a 
j>rospered giver from his abundance, while the humble sister at his 
side was putting into the Lord's treasury all her living. The furnish- 
ing of boxes of clothing, books, and other helpful supplies for mission- 
ary families still keeps its strong hold upon the sewing circles and 
other women's associations in city and country. As will be seen in its 
appropriate place, the number of " missionary boxes'' reported has 
been largely in advance of last year's supply, and enough for all reason- 
able needs. The contributions to the Woman's Fund for Foreign Work 
have been $5,674,16. This fact, among others, shows that the readi- 
ness to give directly to the treasury the cash needed for carrying on 
the general work, is stiil rapidly increasing. The Ladies' Missionary 
Association, having its office in Boston, has this year continued and 
largely added to its generous and timely help, furnishing $1,700 : — 
which paid the salaries of four lady teachers in Arkansas and the 
Indian Territory. 

We have again to gratefully acknowledge valuable help from women 
in many congregations in the circulation of The Home Missionary, 
" Our Country," and other publications of the Society. 

THE SUNDAY-SCHOOLS. 

Another year's experience has deepened that conviction of the 
untold value of Sunday-school instruction and care, which has so long 
spurred the missionaries of this Society to tireless efforts for the 
welfare of the children and youth. The number of new schools organ- 
ized within the year is 323 ; the number now under the direct and 
permanent care of our missionaries and their churches is 2,188; the 
number of scholars gathered in them is about 129,350. What large 
and blessed promise for the future of the newer States and Territories; 
what protection for the gathering thousands of the frontier ; what 
growing hope for the well-being of our whole land in coming centuries 
lie in these brief statements, they can best understand who have 
watched most closely the development of the Sunday-school work for a 



94 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

generation, and know how largely it has molded the character and 
shaped the career of the men to whom our country is most indebted. 
What has been shall be, only in ever-growing measure. With the 
faithful pastor to gather, watch, guide and nourish the children on 
every missionaiw field, with the fraternal aid of the Sunday-school and 
Publishing Society to supply all needed helps in the way of papers 
and books for teachers and scholars, are we not justified in making 
much of this branch of our work, and centering upon it the brightest 
hopes ? We earnestly ask in its behalf the prayers of all who care for 
the little ones, so dear to the heart of Christ. 

OUE PUBLICATIONS. 

No careful reader of the fifty-ninth volume of The Home Mission- 
ary can fail to see how greatly it has surpassed each and all of its 
predecessors. Facts within the knowledge of the officers of the Society 
amply justify the added outlay of time, labor, care and money devoted 
to this chief purveyor to the treasury. There can be no other so 
economical medium of communication between Eastern churches and 
Western missionaries, between givers and receivers ; no other so direct 
and easy channel for the facts and arguments essential to the securing 
of that praying and giving on which the whole work depends. 

While still rigidly holding to " this one thing," from which it takes 
its name, the magazine, in its enlarged form, with greater editorial care, 
by much greater scope and variety of treatment, has drawn to itself 
new interest and multiplied its influence for good in various forms, as 
many pastors are learning, to the profit of their people. A new feature 
added within the year, " Our Young People," is received with marked 
favor by the children and youth, and may be made still more attractive 
and profitable, if parents, pastors and teachers will give us their wise 
co-operation. 

Very large and useful additions have been made to our list of 
Leaflets, which pastors and others friendly to Home Missions, are 
finding quick demand for in most intelligent parishes. A list of thirty- 
six of these lively publications is given in The Home Missionary for 
June, 1887. The list will be republished quarterly, with such addi- 
tions as may meanwhile be made. We will gladly furnish (gratis) 
sample copies of any or all of these for examination ; also copies of 
The Home Missionary for July, in which number the Annual Report 
of the Society's work is given. 

The Society's remarkable book, " Our Country," by Rev. Josiah 
Strong, D.D., abates no jot of its popularity. Its careful compilation 
of statistics gives it permanent value ; the force of its argument for a 
vigorous prosecution of Home Missions cannot be evaded ; its spiritual 
impulse uplifts the soul of the Christian, and stirs the conscience of even 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 95 

the unbelieving reader. By its circulation friends of Home Missions 
can greatly help the cause. It can be had from " The Baker and Taylor 
Company," 9 Bond Street, New York (who are now about issuing the 
seventieth thousand), or at the Society's office, Bible House. Price fifty 
cents, bound in cloth, or twenty-five cents in paper covers. 

Of "A Wind from the Holy Spirit," Supt. M. W. Montgomery's 
book on the work among the Scandinavians, about 6,000 copies have been 
sold. It may still be had from the Society's office. Price 45 cents in 
cloth binding, with portraits of Drs. Waldenstrom and Ekman; 20 cents, 
paper, with portraits; 10 cents, paper, without portraits. 

FAMILY SUPPLIES. 

In no previous year since the work began has so much been done 
in this helpful line, though no call has been made for an increase of 
" missionary boxes." No less than 706 packages (101 more than last 
year), have been acknowledged in The Home Missionary, from Ladies' 
Societies and individuals, who have prepared and sent them for the 
comfort and cheer of home missionary households. The value of 642 of 
these packages is estimated by their donors at $64,658.18. Reckoning 
those unestimated at the same average rate, the total value is $71,103.62 
— more than $14,100 in advance of last year. 

A beautiful token this, of the appreciation of the work of the toilers 
in the field on the part of their Eastern sisters. This, in a year when 
so much more than ever before has been paid into the treasury in cash, 
by these same Christian women is a significant fact, most honorable to 
the zeal and self-denial of the givers. Blessed are they who do these 
things unto our Lord's " brethren," for his sake. 



96 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 

DISTRIBUTION OF MISSIONARIES BY STATES. 



July, 



Society's vear 


Eastern States. 


MiddleStates 


Southern States. 


4) 

Eh 


, n 

O O) 
































beginning 
1826. 


s 
'3 




> 
1 


QQ 


W 


- 



u 



120 


03 

1-5 

1 


- 
PH 

7 


°l 


1 


2 


"a 
St 

1 


> 


53 
O 

1 





'3 






X 



1 


< 


■d 



2 




03 

~ 
a 






<5 


1— '26-'27.. 






2— '27-'28.. 


i 


2 


2 








120 


1 


11 








2 




3 


2 




1 








1 










3— '28-'29.. 


40 


2 


29 


il.. 




117 




10 






2 


3 




6 


2 


3 


3 




2 




2 










4— '29-'30.. 


47 


29 


"7 


3 


1 


133 


i 


13 












4 


1 


2 






3 














5— '30-'31.. 


54 


31 


::;, 


i 3 


21 


148 


2 


in 








2 




3 


2 




2 


1 


1 




1 










6— '31-'32.. 


62 


40 


32 


li 3 25 


157 


2 


11 








2 




2 


1 


1 


3 


1 
















7— '32-'33.. 


66 


50 


3x 


55 4 26 


151 


3 


16 








2 




4 






4 




1 




1 










8— '33-'34. . 


83 


63 


12 


62 3 34; 


177 


3 


•2d 


1 






3 




a 






6 








1 










9— '34-'35.. 


87 


49 


12 


68 6 37 


185 


6 


22 


3 


1 




4 




3 




3 


4 


2 




1 




1 








10— '35-'36.. 


90 


59 


53 


71 6 


40 


183 


5 


20 


2 


1 




3 




1 




1 


1 


4 




2 












H_'36-'37.. 


107 


63 


50 


74 ■■ 


37 


186 


6 


34 


1 


1 




5 




1 




1 




3 




1 












12— '37-38.. 


71 


56 


52 


76 ■• 


33 


161 


7 


29 


1! 


■'. 




2 








3 


1 


3 
















13— '38-'39.. 


70 


4P 


!7 


80 5 


34 


1 148 


8 


41 


1 


3 




3 








1 


' 1 


1 
















14— '39-40.. 


71 


55 


51 


73 2 38, 


1 165 


12 


27 


1 







2 








1 




1 
















15_'40-'41.. 


74 


17 


50 


82 4 35 


167 


11 


35 


2 


1 




2 




















1 








16— '41-'42.. 


73 


50 


54 


83 '3 42; 


| 187 


11 


40 


2 


1 


i 


1 




2 




1 








1 




1 








17_ '42-'43.. 


68 


r 


53 


78; 3 39, 


1 193 


10 


47 


3 


1 


1 


1 




2 




1 








1 












18— '43-' 44.. 


75 


42 


40 


64 1 5 


42 


201 


10 


44 


2 


2 


1 


2 








1 


1 






1 




1 








1!)_ '44-'45.. 


82 


45 


39 


6fi 7 


46 


188 


10 


51 




1 


1 


1 




1 






1 






1 




1 








20— '45-'46.. 


80 


15 


45 


56 8 


49, 


211 


6 


53 


1 


1 


1 


4 




1 




1 


1 






1 


1 










21— '46-'47.. 


86 


11 


43 


or 6 


36 


198 


7 


47 


2 


3 


1 


3 




1 




1 


1 






1 












22— '47-' 48.. 


91- 


46 


45 


62 10 


41 


187 


4 


45 


1 


3 


2 


5 








3 


1 










1 








23— '48-'49.. 


89 


41 


50 


67 10 


45 


186 


4 


40 




4 


2 


7 








1 












1 








24— '49-'50.. 


92 


40 


58 


60 6 


45 


173 


6 


47 


2 


1 


2 


9 




2 




2 












1 








25— '50-'51.. 


91 


46 


61 


61 7 


45 


170 


11 


42 


1 


2 


1 


11 




2 




1 




















26— '51-52.. 


96 


U 


60 


54 7 


44 


157 


li) 


44 


2 


1 


1 


8 




























27— '52-'53.. 


101 


46 


58 


54 9 


45 


158 


9 


45 


3 




1 


7 








1 








1 












28— '53-' 54. . 


93 


U 


57 


46 10 


42 


154 


in 


44 


2 


2 


1 


6 








1 








1 












29— '54-'55.. 


92 


48 


45 


43 7 


43 


146 


11 


40 


1 


1 


1 


7 








1 








1 












30— '55-' 56.. 


97 


43 


43 


42 7 


44 


137 


13 


48 








8 




























31— '56-' 57.. 


91 


43 


53 


38 6 


40 


133 


12 


46 








6 




























32— '57-'58.. 


91 


45 


77 


34 8 


36 


133 


14 


40 


1 






3 




























33— '58-59.. 


92 


15 


97 


38 8 


39 


135 


12 


53 


1 


































34— '59-'60.. 


81 


52 


99 


43 8 


44 


138 


L2 


48 


1 


































35— '60-'61.. 


86 


5] 


75 


44' 8 


44 


121 


12 


47 


1 


































-36— '61-' 62.. 


88 


39 


64 


47; 8 


49 


80 


3 


4 




































37— '62-'63.. 


82 


39 


(in 


45 6 


49 


43 


2 


2 




































38— '63-'64.. 


77 


34 


58 


60 6 


54 


42 






































39— '64-'65. . 


77 


39 


(il 


59, 5 


5'2 


53 




5 




































40— '65-'66.. 


78 


39 


53 


61 7 


15 


I 58 


1 


5 












1 




1 






i 






1 








41— '66-'67.. 


82 


38 


65 


63 6 


30 


57 


2 


6 








2 




1 




1 












1 








42— '67-68.. 


94 


45 


t\f, 


61 4 


37 


57 


4 


12 








2 




1 








1 


1 






1 








43— '68-'69.. 


85 


48 


7:» 


70 6 


36 


57 


5 


11 








3 












1 


2 






1 








44— '69-'70.. 


89 


42 


65 


74 6 


34 


55 


7 


9 








3 












1 


1 






1 








45— '70-'71.. 


95 


38 


60 


64 6 


33 


52 


7 


10 








3 












1 








1 








46— '71-'72.. 


110 


85 


58 


61 8 


3fi 


49 


7 


6 








3 




























47— '72-'73.. 


102 


•'i:i 


57 


66 7 


411 


39 


7 


3 








2 


1 


























48— '73-'74. . 


110 


39 


51 


65 6 


39 


47 


5 


6 








2 


2 












1 






2 








49— '74-'75.. 


82 


45 


45 


66 6 


48 


53 


5 


9 








1 


2 












1 




1 


2 








50— '75-'76.. 


90 


47 


49 


73 6 


39, 


51 


8 


13 








1 


2 












1 




1 


2 








51— '76-'77.. 


77 


49 


48 


81 : 6 


42 


51 


9 


10 








1 


2 


















2 


1 






52— '77-'78.. 


83 


49 


57 


76| 7 


41 


57 


6 


7 








1 


2 


















2 


1 






53— '78-'79.. 


86 


49 


-,r, 


71 7 


44 


47 


6 


4 








2 


2 
















1 


1 


1 






54— '79-'80.. 


82 


55 


61 


76 8 


45 


45 


7 


5 








2 


1 
















1 


2 


1 






55— '80-'81.. 


82 


59 


53 


75 8 


4 4 


51 


6 


5 








1 


1 
















1 


2 


3 


1 


1 


56— '81-S2.. 


95 


59 


53 


75 7 


30 


43 


5 


7 




1 




1 


1 














3 


1 


4 


4 


2 


1 


57— '82-'83.. 


89 


64 


52 


72 10 


39 


46 


5 


15 




1 




1 


2 






1 








3 


3 


4 


5 


2 


2 


58— '83-'84.. 


94 


62 


53 


83 8 


111 


53 


4 


23 




1 




1 


2 






s 








6 


10 


13 


13 


7 


3 


59— '84-'85.. 


104 


66 


55 


88, 7 


40 


67 


8 


is 






1 


2 


3 






12 








10 


li; 


14 


16 


6 


5 


450— '85-'86.. 


103 


64 


60 


971 9 


4<i 


71 


4 


23 




1 


1 


1 


1 






9 








11 


26 


15 


16 





4 


61— '86-'87.. 


99 


65 


62 


97 10 

1 


50 


67 


7 


23 




1 
1 


3 


2 


2 






7 






1 


18 


26 


7 


15 


14 


4 



Each state is here given credit for services of minister, though lie may have served in other States 

Remarks on the Tables.— 1. At the organization of the A. H. M. S., in 182(1, the missionaries of 
the United Domestic .Missionary Society, whose responsibilities it assumed, were transferred to it, and 
the greater portion of them were in commission in the State of New York. 

2. The .Massachusetts Home Missionary Society, the New Hampshire Home Missionary Society, 
and the Vermont Domestic Missionary Society became integral parts of the National Society in the sec- 
ond year of its operations; the Maine Missionary society in the third year, and the Connecticut Mission- 
ary society, in the sixth year. 

. 3. In 1H45, the missions of this Society in Canada were, by an amicable arrangement with the Brit- 
ish Colonial .Missionary Society, transferred to the care of that Institution. 

4. tni he Table will be seen the progress which has been made, year by year, in the newer States 
of the West, as they have severally come into being, and presented fields of peculiar promise for mis- 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 

DISTRIBUTION OF MISSIONARIES BY STATES. 



97 



Society's 

year, 

beginning 

[82«. 



1— '20-'27. 
2— '27-28. 
3— '28-29. 
4_'29-'80. 
5— 'SO-'Sl. 
6— '31-32. 
7_'82-'83. 
8— '83-'84. 
9_'34-'35. 
10— '85-'36. 

11— '36-'37. 

12— '37-'38. 
13— '33-'39. 
14— '89-'40. 
15— '40-'41. 
16— '41-42. 
17— '42-'43. 
18—43-44. 
19— '44-45. 
20— '45-46. 

21— '46-47. 

22— '47-48. 
23— '48-'49. 
24— '49-50. 
25— '50-51. 
26— '51-52. 
27— '52-'53. 
28— '53-54. 
29— '54-'55. 
30— '55-56. 
31— '56-57. 
32— '57-58. 
33— '58-59. 
34-'59-'60. 
35— 60-'61. 
36— '61-62. 
37_'62-'63. 
38— '63-64. 
39— '64-65. 
40— '65-66. 
41— '66-'67. 
42— '67-68. 
43— '68-69. 
44— '69-70. 
45— '70-71. 
46—71-72. 
47— '72-73. 
48— '73-74. 
49— '74-'75. 
50— '75-76. 
51— '76-77. 
52— '77-78. 
53— '78-79. 
54— '79-80. 
55— '80-81. ■ 
56—81-82. 
57— '82-83. 
58—83-84. 
59— '84-'85. 
60— '85-'86. 
61— '86-'S7. 



South'n 
States. 



Wkstkkn States and Tkkhitokies. 



16 

27 
43 
64 
74 
74 
80 
68 
85 
80 
72 
64 
56 
54 
53 
66 
75 
93 
99 

UK! 
95 

L02 
94 
'.•7 
93 
93 
96 



6 110 
1 101 
80 



37 

33 

:;s 

43 

40 

34 

. 30 

. 32 

. 30 

. 37 

. 39 

. 27 

.! 21 

26 

23 

25 

21 

26 

33 

41 

39 

43 

38 



2 
3 
8 
12 
17 
20 
23 
24 
29 
32 
31 
27 
31 
39 
42 
50 
65 
87 
95 
98 
92 
liil 
110 
114 
59 ! 119 
63 117 
58 1118 
43 J 105 
35 102 



93 
88 
82 
93 
100 
89 
83 
83 
94 
95 
78 
78 
86 
86 
72 
71 
63 
59 
53 
51 
54 
45 



43 
55 
4s 
44 
9 45 



2 

2 

2 

2 

4 

l'.i 

25 

31 

32 

36 

12 

in 

35 

35 

33 

28 

30 

44 32 

28 

21 

30 

27 

36 



13 


51 


45 


13 


60 


51 


9 


54 


:,1 


8 


60 


54 



4 
5 
5 
in 
12 
16 
20 
16 
16 
17 
29 
22 
22 
24 
26 
36 
46 
63 
65 
67 
77 
80 
73 
74 
80 
77 
80 
76 
77 
72 
68 
65 
65 
68 
71 
59 
62 
62 
70 
67 
71 
73 
85 
77 
67 
69 
78 
80 
78 
76 
85 
85 
75 
87 
95 
93 
112 
L30 
135 
126 
123 



1 
1 
2 
3 
6 
8 
19 
28 
30 
:;i 
36 
44 
49 
58 
63 
72 
84 
83 
87 
100 
87 
84 
93 
102 
108 
100 
82 
76 
73 
68 
72 
71 
64 
68 
76 
77 
77 
70 
69 
67 
72 
69 
66 
56 
59 
54 
57 
57 
51 
64 
46 
56 



2 .... 
4 .... 

4 .... 
6 .... 
8 .... 
10 3 
14 3 
87 24 3 
96 33 12 
102 J34! 14 
115 41 17 
127 46 16 
103 



19 
23 
33 
39 
60 
62 
67 
49 70 
56 69 
60 75 
61 1 85 
55 91 
86 55 90 



45 18 
34, 12 
38| 15 
35 J 15 
35 17 



ia J i . 



3W|| 



-' * £ 



60102 
58 1(17 
7n 93 
62 71 89 
62 198 102 
74 87 105 

78 101 97 

79 102 105 



1 

2 

2 

■1 

5 

5 

4 

3 

5 

7 

9 
in 
12 
11 
14 
is 
25 
35 
44 
41 
40 
67 
52 
49 12 
52 17 
59 23 
56 37 
61 55 
83 102 
91|110 
87 U" 
113 120 



10 



6 

6 1 
10' 
11 . 
15 . 
23 5 
26 3 



2 

2 
1 

1 
2 
6 
6 

25 2 10 7 
24 5 6 12 

26 6 8 13 
26 11 5 3 



g a 
5 £ 



.. 12 

10 15 
13 25 
15 28 

12 32 

13 38 



sionary culture. When this Society was formed, Indiana and fiiiimis were in their infancy, Michigan 

was. at that time and for ten years subsequent, a Territory; in lsi> it had but one Presbyterian or 
Congregational minister,and he was a missionary. Wiscmtsin remained, eight years after the organization 
of this .society, the almost undisputed home of the Indian. Iowa was not organized as a Territory till 
1838. Oregon was reached by our first missionary there in the summer of 1848, after a voyage of many 
months by way of the Sandwich islands. Our first missionaries to California sailed from New York in 
December, bis. Our first missionary to Minnesota commenced his labors at St. Paul, in July 1849. 

J. It should be borne in mind that the number of missionaries in these newer States and Territo- 
ries, as well as those that have been longer cultivated, gives but an imperfect idea of the ground that 
has been occupied by missionary enterprise. Churches, every year, become independent, and others 
are taken up in their stead. 



98 



July, 



THE HOME MISSIONAKY. 

DISTRIBUTION OF MISSIONARIES BY SECTIONS. 

The following Table gives the number of missionaries, each year of the Society's 
operations, in the geographical divisions of Eastern, Middle, Southern, and Western 
States ; and also in Canada. 



Society's Year, be- 
ginning 1S26. 


New England 
States. 


Middle States. 


Southern and 

Southwestern 

States. 


VVest'n States 
and Terri- 
tories. 


Canada. 


Total. 


1— '26-'27 


1 


129 


5 


33 


1 


169 


2— '27-'28 


5 


130 


9 


56 




201 


3— '28-'29 


72 


127 


23 


80 


2 


304 


4— '29-'30 


107 


147 


13 


122 


3 


392 


5— '30-'31 


144 


160 


12 


145 


2 


463 


6— '31-'32 


163 


169 


10 


166 1 


509 


7— '32-'33 


239 


170 


9 


185 3 


606 


8— '33-'34 


287 


201 


13 


169 6 


676 


9— '34-'35 


289 


216 


18 


187 


9 


719 


10— '35-'36 


319 


219 


11 


191 


15 


755 


li— '36-';;7 


331 


227 


11 


195 


22 


786 


12— '37-'38 


288 


198 


8 


166 


24 


684 


13— '38-'39 


284 


198 


9 


160 


14 


665 


14— '39-'40 


290 


205 





167 


12 


680 


15— '40-'41 


292 


215 


5 


169 


9 


690 


16— '41-'42 


305 


249 


5 


222 


10 


791 


17— '42-'43 


288 


253 


7 


291 


9 


848 


18— '43-'44 


268 


257 


10 


365 


7 


907 


19— '44-'45 


285 


249 


6 


397 


6 


943 


20— '45-'46 


274 


271 


9 


417 




971 


21— , 46- , 47 


275 


254 


10 


433 






972 


22— '47-'48 


295 


237 


18 


456 






1,006 


23— '48-'49 


302 


239 


15 


463 






1,019 


24— '49-'50 


301 


228 


15 


488 






1,033 


25— '50-'51 


311 


224 


15 


515 




1,065 


26— '51-'52 


305 


213 


14 


530 




1,065 


27— '52-T)3 


313 


215 


12 


547 




1,087 


28— '53-'54 


292 


214 


11 


530 




1,047 


29— '54-'55 


278 


. 207 


10 


537 




1,032 


30— '55-'56 


276 


198 


8 


504 




986. 


31— '56-'57 


271 


191 


6 


506 




974 


32— '57-'58 


291 


197 


3 


521 




1,012 


33— '58-'59 


319 


201 




534 




1,054 


34— '59-'60 


327 


199 




581 




1,107 


35— '60-'6l 


308 


181 




573 


'.'. 


36— '61-'62 


295 


87 




481 




863 


37— '62-'63 


281 


48 




405 






734 


38— '63-'64 


289 


44 




423 






756 


39— '64-'65 


293 


58 




451 






803 


40— '65-'66 


283 


64 


4 


467 






818 


41— '66-'67 


284 


66 


5 


491 






846 


42— '67-'68 


307 


73 


7 


521 






908 


43— '68-'69 


327 


73 


8 


564 






972 


44— '69-'70 


311 


71 


6 


556 






944 


45— '70-'71 


296 


69 


5 


570 






940 


46— '71-'72 


308 


62 


3 


588 






961 


47— '72-'73 


312 


49 


3 


587 






951 


48— '73-'74 


310 


58 


7 


594 






969 


49— '74-'75 


292 


67 


7 


586 






953 


50— '75-'76 


304 


72 


8 


595 






979 


51— '76-'77 


303 


70 


6 


617 






996 


52— '77-'78 


316 


70 


6 


604 






996 


53— '78-'79 


312 


57 


10 


567 






946 


54— '79-'80 


327 


57 


9 


622 






1,015 


55— '80-'81 


321 


62 


9 


640 






1,033 


56— '81-'82 


328 


56 


17 


669 






1,070 


57— '82-'83 


326 


68 


61 


695 






1,150 


58— '83-'84 


334 


77 


63 


868 






1,342 


59— '84-'85 


349 


93 


123 


882- 






1.447 


60— '85-'86 


368 


99 


134 


868 






1.469 


61— '86-87 


375 


103 


143 


950 






1,571 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 

GENERAL COMPARATIVE RESULTS. 



1)9 



Society's 

3Tear, 
beginning 

1826. 



1— : 26-'27 
2_'27-'28 
3— '28 '29 

i— '•_)'. i '30 
5— '30 '31 
6— '31-'32 
7— '32-'33 
8— '33-'34 
9— '84-'35 
10— '35-'36 
11— '36-'37 
12— '37-38 
13— '38-'39 
14— '3.t-'40 
15— '40-'41 
16— '41-42 
17— '42-43 
18— 43-'44 
19— '44-'45 
20— '45-'46 
21— '46-'47 
22— '47-48 
23— '48-'49 
24— '49-'50 
25— '50-'51 
26— '51-'52 
27— '52-'53 
28— '53-'54 
29— '54-55 
30— '55-'56 
31— '56-'57 
32— '57-' 58 
33— '58-'59 
34— '59-'60 
35— '60-61 
36— '61-'62 
37— '62-'63 
38— '63-'64 
39— '64-'65 
40— '65-'66 
41— '66-'67 
42— '67-'68 
43— '68-'69 
44— '69-70 
45— '70-'71 
46— '71-'72 
47— ! 72-'73 
48— '73-'74 
49— '74-'75 
50— '75-'76 
51— '76-'77. 
52— '77-'78 
53— '78-79 
54— '79-80 
55— '80-'81 
56— '81-'82 
57— '82-'83 
58— '83-'84 
59— '84-'85 
60— '8o-'86 
61— - 86-'87 



Receipts. Expenditures 



$18,140 76 
20,085 78 
26,997 31 
88,929 44 
48,124 7:! 
49,422 12 
68,627 17 
78,91] M 
88,863 22 

101.565 L5 
85,701 59 
86,522 45 
82,564 63 
78,345 20 
85,413 34 
92,463 64 
99,812 84 

101,9(14 99 
121.946 28 
125,124 7(i 
116,717 94 
140.197 10 
145,925 91 
157,160 78 
150.94(1 25 
160,062 25 
171,734 24 
191,2(19 07 
180,136 69 
193,548 37 
178,060 68 
175,971 37 
188,139 29 
185.216 17 
183,761 80 
163,852 51 
164,884 29 
195,537 89 
186,897 50 
221,191 85 
212.567 63 
217,577 25 
244,390 96 
283,102 87 
246,567 26 

294.566 86 
267,691 42 
290.12(1 34 
308.V.I0 82 
310,027 62 
293,712 62 
284,486 44 
273,691 53 
266,720 41 
290,953 72 
340,778 47 
370,981 56 
385.(1(14 10 
451,767 66 
524,544 9:3 
482,979 60 



$13,984 17 
17,849 22 
26,814 96 
42,429 50 

47,247 60 

52, sum 39 

66,277 96 

80,015 7(1 

83,3! i 28 

92,188 94 

99,529 72 

85,056 26 

82,655 64 

7 1,533 19 

84,864 06 

94,300 1 1 

98,215 U 

104,276 17 

118,360 12 

126,193 15 

119,17(140 

1 3: i, •.:.;:: :;1 

143,771 67 

145,456 09 

153.817 90 

162,831 14 

174,439 24 

184,025 76 

177,717 34 

186,611 02 

180,550 44 

190,735 70 

187,034 41 

192:737 69 

183,762 70 

158,336 33 

133,843 39 

149,325 58 

189,965 39 

208.811 18 

227,96: 97 

254,668 65 

274,932 55 

270.927 58 

263,617 19 

281,182 50 

278,830 24 

287,662 nl 

296.789 65 
309,871 84 
310,604 11 
284.540 71 
260.330 29 
259,709 86 
284.414 22 
339,795 04 
354,105 80 
419.449 45 
460,722 83 

498.790 16 
507,988 79 



a 


CI 

.2 ^ 


A a 

t* . 

Aj •— CO 





CO <u 


E S — 


CO 

'Ji 

-. CO 

3 .2 


a * 

faca 


a g E 

8«i 



d 
ft 


ft 


No. of 
tlons an 
ary I 


169 


68 


196 


201 


89 


244 


304 


169 


401 


392 


166 


500 


463 


164 


577 


509 


158 


745 


606 


209 


801 


676 


200 


899 


719 


204 


1,050 


755 


249 


t,coo 


786 


232 


1,025 


684 


123 


840 


665 


201 


794 


680 


194 


842 


690 


178 


862 


791 


248 


987 


848 


225 


1,047 


907 


237 


1,245 


943 


209 


1,285 


971 


223 


1,453 


972 


189 


1,470 


1,006 


205 


1,447 


1,019 


192 


1,510 


1.032 


205 


1,575 


' 1,065 


211 


1,820 


1,065 


204 


1,948 


1,087 


213 


2,160 


1,047 


167 


2,140 


1,032 


180 


2,124 


986 


187 


1,965 


974 


201 


1,985 


1,012 


242 


2,034 


1,054 


250 


2,125 


1,107 


260 


2,175 


1,062 


212 


2,025 


863 


153 


1,668 


734 


155 


1,455 


756 


176 


1,518 


802 


199 


1,575 


818 


186 


1,594 


846 


208 


1,645 


908 


250 


1,710 


972 


246 


1,956 


944 


246 


1,836 


940 


227 


1,957 


961 


236 


2,011 


951 


217 


2,145 


969 


241 


2,195 


952 


214 


2,223 


979 


240 


2,274 


996 


234 


2,196 


996 


209 


2,237 


946 


199 


2,126 


1,015 


256 


2,308 


1,032 


255 


2,0:3 


1,070 


262 


2,L 8 


1.150 


301 


2,6 9 


1,342 


401 


2,93U 


i;447 


380 


2,999 


1,469 


372 


3,005 


1,571 


392 


3,063 



H 



110 
133 
186 
274 
294 
361 
417 
463 
490 
545 
554 
438 
473 
486 
501 
594 
657 
665 
736 
760 
713 
773 
808 
812 
853 
862 
878 
870 
815 
775 
780 
795 
810 
868 
835 
612 
562 
603 
635 
643 
655 
702 
734 
693 
716 
762 
714 
726 
701 
734 
727 
739 
710 
761 
783 
799 
817 
962 
1,017 
1,058 
1,117 



n't r'p 

1,000 
1,678 
L.959 
2,523 
6,126 
4,284 
2,736 
3,300 
3,750 
3,752 
3,376 
3,920 
4,750 
4,618 
5,514 
8,223 
7,693 
4,929 
5,311 
4,400 
5;020 
5,550 
6,682 
6,578 
6,820 
6,079 
6,025 
5,634 
5,602 
5,550 
6,784 
8,791 
6,287 
5,600 
4,207 
3,108 
3,902 
3,820 
3,924 
5,959 
6,214 
6,470 
6,404 
5.833 
6,358 
5,725 
5,421 
6,361 
7,836 
8,065 
7,578 
5,232 
5,598 
5,922 
6,032 
6,527 
7,907 
8,734 
9,050 
19,031 



a - 



CO CI 



not rep, 
306 
423 
572 
700 
783 
1,148 

Pupils. 

52 000 

... 00 

80,000 
67,000 
58,500 
S0,000 
54, LOO 
64,300 
68,400 
60,300 
60,000 
76,700 
73,000 
77,000 
83,500 
75,000 
70,000 
66,500 
72,500 
65. 100 
G4 00 
60,000 
62,500 
65,500 
67,300 
72,200 
70,000 
60,300 
54.000 
55; 200 
58,600 
61,200 
64,000 
66,300 
75,300 
75.750 
71,500 
76,500 
74,000 
74,700 
80,750 
85,370 
86,300 
91,762 
87,573 
96,724 
99,898 
104,308 
1 106,638 
116,314 
118,1 00 

129,350 



«-£ 



127 
134 
144 
155 
160 
146 
159 
172 
170 
169 
180 
19-1 
175 
162 
100 
159 
149 
157 
160 
166 
167 
180 
178 
179 
180 
189 
199 
212 
218 
241 
231 
240 
231 
222 
220 
259 
240 
248 
299 
325 
348 
364 
374 
390 
368 
369 
391 
395 
423 
422 
442 
385 
367 
341 
363 
425 
433 
436 
453 
471 
454 



1. The total receipts for sixty-one vears is $11,536,692.20. 

2. The total of years of labor is 40,976 . 

3. The w hole number of additions to the churches is 345,973. 

4. The average expenditure for a year of missionary labor includes the entire cost of the Society 
of obtaining the missionary, defraying his expense to his Meld, and sustaining him on it, as well as the 
average proportion of all the exrjeuses in conducting the institution. 



100 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

AUXILIAEIES AND MISSIONAKY FIELDS. 

MAINE MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Rev. John O. Fiske, D.D., President; Rev. Jonathan E. Adams, Bangor, Secre- 
tary; John L. Crosby, Esq., Bangor, Treasurer. Office in Bangor. 
The receipts of this Auxiliary within the year ending February 28th, were : 

From churches and individuals $8,102 25 

From Woman's Missionary Auxiliary 1,434 67 

From legacies 11,161 28 

Income from invested funds 3,341 27 

$24,099 47 
The National Society received from churches and individuals in Maine 

for the national work, within the year ending March 31st 3,649 41 

Total amount raised in the State, in cash, for Home Missions $27,748 88 

The Auxiliary expended in its own field, for missionary labor and ex- 
penses, within the year ending February 28th 10,709 91 

Special gifts 50 00 

Interest on trust funds 474 00 

The Auxiliary paid into the treasury of the National Society, in cash, 

for the national work, within the year ending March 31st 250 00 

Ninety-seven missionaries have borne the commission of the Society 
for the whole or part of the year, and have rendered over sixty-six years 
of service. Ninety-nine churches have received grants, while some of the 
pastors have supplied regularly other fields. Two have been ordained, 
and one has been installed. Three houses of worship have been dedi- 
cated, and two others are ready for that service. Several houses have 
been repaired. One parsonage has been purchased. The General Mis- 
sionary work continues to be of interest and value, and is better appre- 
ciated, every year. No extensive revivals are reported, but the churches 
visited are quickened. Some in each place are led to determine for the 
Christian life, and the aggregate returns of conversions and additions 
show good results. 

"This most Eastern State," says the Secretary, "must be missionary 
ground for years to come; first, because business changes, and once 
thrifty places are in part abandoned, the families leaving the State, or 
going to the newer settlements. So once self-supporting churches 
come upon the list of aided churches every year. Then Maine is not 
half developed. New and thrifty towns spring up in unexpected quar- 
ters, and demand the presence of the minister before society crystallizes 
sufficiently for it to care for his support, or even to desire his presence. 
For these and other reasons Maine will stand with Michigan and Kansas 
as a missionary State. So while we sympathize with the broader work, 
and give for its advancement, we are compelled first of all to regard the 
waste places within our own borders. The home appropriations must 
increase for years to come." 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 101 

NEW HAMPSHIRE HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Rev. Samuel C. Babtlett, D.D., LL.D., President; Rev. Edwabd E. Greeley, 
D.D., Secretary; Hon. Lyman D. Stevens, Treasurer. Ollice in Concord. 

The Receipts of litis Auxiliary within the year ending February 28th, were : 

From churches and individuals $4,676 06 

From legacies 2,!)!)5 64 

From N. II. Cent Institution 2,233 79 

Income from invested funds 2,834 00 

$12,739 49 
The National Society received from churches and individuals in New 

Hampshire for the national work, within the year ending March 31st. 9,292 08 

Total amount raised in the State, in cash, for Home Missions $22,031 57 

The Auxiliary expended in its own field, for missionary labor and ex- 
penses, within the year ending February 28th 11,946 72 

The Auxiliary paid into the treasury of the National Society, in cash 

for the national work, within the year ending March 31st 1,236 67 

This Society has had in commission sixty-three missionaries the- 
whole or a part of the year. Sixty-three churches and at least twenty- 
three out stations have been supplied, and over forty-five years of serv- 
ice performed. The church at Mason has assumed self-support. Seven 
houses of worship have been repaired, and three parsonages provided. 
The Secretary says : 

" Our churches our still spending and being spent for others — rais- 
ing up young men and women to go down into the cities and out upon 
the frontier, and they mean to continue doing so. Only rarely and under 
peculiar circumstances do any of them show signs of discouragement 
or of yielding in the struggle, often very severe, to sustain the institu- 
tions of the gospel. The last year has been characterized by more than 
usual religious interest and by comparative prosperity. In one respect 
the developments of the year have riot been so encouraging. An unu- 
sual number of churches hitherto self-supporting have called for aid. 
The demands of the work upon the benevolence of the churches are 
steadily increasing and are likely to continue to increase." 

VERMONT DOMESTIC MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Hon. Henry Fairbanks, Ph.D., President; Rev. Charles S. Smith, Secretary - T 
J. C. Emery, Esq., Treasurer. Office in Montpelier. 
The Receipts of this Auxiliary within the year ending February 28th, were : 

From churches and individuals $7,049 51 

From legacies 775 00 

Income from invested funds 377 79 

$8,202 30 
The National Society received from churches and individuals in Ver- 
mont for the national w r ork, within the year ending March 31st 11,334 69 

Total amount raised in the State, in cash, for Home Missions $19,536 99 



102 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

The Auxiliary expended in its own field, for missionary labor and ex- 
penses, within the year ending February 28th §10,718 48 

The Auxiliary paid into the treasury of the National Society, in cash, 

for thenational work, within the year ending March 31st 40 00 

The Secretary reports that sixty missionaries have been employed in 
sixty-three fields performing fort's -eight years of service. One of these 
has been a Missionary at Large, at work for the entire year, and another 
a county missionary for two months. These latter have performed labor 
for brief periods in several fields not included in the above number. 
One church has been organized, and one has assumed self-support. 

" The employment of a Missionary at Large who, as a minute man, 
can visit any locality, on short notice, explore wastes, spend a week or 
two with a discouraged and pastorless church and engage in evangelical 
work as may be needed is an effective help in strengthening the " things 
that remain that are ready to die" in our rural towns. Increased atten- 
tion is being given in the State to the evangelizing of tiie non-church- 
going communities. For two years past, as an experiment, we have 
aided a small church, with a large outlying territory, in employing for a 
part of the year a laborer who devoted his whole time in visiting from 
house to house, and holding meetings in school and private houses, with 
most encouraging results. We are striving to impress upon our mission- 
ary churches that it is a great mistake to concentrate their thoughts upon 
themselves and their own prosperity instead of making the salvation of 
the surrounding population the end of their aims and prayers. Their 
inquiry should be, not, how shall we continue to live? bat, how can we 
impart life to Our neighbors ? If others are made partakers of the new 
life the church will live also and have life more abundantly. 

" A good degree of spiritual prosperity has attended our work, but 
we have not experienced that general quickening and fullness of blessing 
for which we hope and pray. We have labored through the year with a 
feeling of poverty and under the shadow of a debt which has made us 
duly humble, but we are not reconciled to it, as our churches are well 
able to furnish the needed funds. 

"The problem of evangelizing the people in our country towns and 
keeping up churches in communities still depleted by emigration, grows 
no easier as the years pass away. It is a constant struggle, a work of 
faith and a labor of love. It requires self-denial, patience, heroism, on 
the part of missionaries and some resolute men and women. So it de- 
velops the best type of character in many families, and helps to train 
children for effective work in the kingdom of Christ all over the world." 

MASSACHUSETTS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 
Rev. Julius H. Seelte, CD., LL.D., President; Rev. Joshua Coit, Secretary; 

Rev. E. B. Palmer, Treasurer. Office in Boston. 
The Receipts of this Auxiliary for Home Missions, within the year 

ending February 28th, were $101,473 17 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 103 

The National Society received from churches and indi\ iduals in Massa- 
chusetts, for the national work, within t he year ending March :jl st $57,573 73 



Total amount raised in the State, in cash, for Home Missions $159,046 90 

The Auxiliary expended on its own field, for missionary labor and ex- 

penses, within the year .ending February 38th 43.070 71 

The Auxiliary paid into the treasury of the National Society, in cash, 

for the national work, within the year ending March 31s1 71.817 09 

This Society has had in its service ninety- five missionaries, the whole 
or a part of the year, performing seventy-nine years of service in con- 
nection with one hundred churches, and at least, sixty out-stations. Two 
churches have assumed self-support. Two houses of worship have been 
erected, and twenty repaired. The Secretary in his report says : " In 
general there has been no marked change in the character of the work 
done by this Societ} 7 . Year after year the feeble and faint churches are 
helped by gifts fiom their stronger sisters, and as the records are sur- 
veyed and results estimated it is only more and more plain as the years 
pass, that such gifts are absolutely necessary to the continuance of 
our churches in many places ; and further, that in no other way does 
money spent by our churches in building the Redeemer's kingdom on 
earth bring larger returns. So far as figures go it appears that, dollar 
for dollar, more is accomplished in the feeble, remote churches than in 
the strong churches of our cities. A thousand dollars given to three or 
four churches in back country towns insures a whole round of Christian 
activity in these churches for a year. Without this gift these churches 
■would either be closed altogether or occasional services would be held , 
uncertain in number and character. With the gift the church has a 
resident minister. The services of the sanctuary are maintained, a 
power in many ways for good. An extra thousand dollars given to a 
strong city church means, perhaps, a church missionary and perhaps a 
-quartet choir. 

" There is, we think, a growing appreciation in our State of the im- 
portance of home missionary work in our own borders, especially among 
our foreign population. The work of our General Missionaries has 
proved itself, as before, of great value ; several churches having been 
quickened and comparatively large additions made upon profession of 
faith, as results of their labors. 

" The work among the French Canadians has been growing in im- 
portance during the year. There have been three churches organized, 
one at Springfield, one at Holyoke, and one at Fall River. Each has 
grown and is likely to grow. In each instance the fact of a church 
organization, with its institutions and ordinances, has exerted an in- 
fluence among the people that could never be had by a mission, however 
vigorously worked. The Springfield church began with thirty-nine 
members May 28th, and has now over fifty. The enterprise has so com- 



104 THE HOME MISSION AEY. July, 

mended itself to the people of that place, that some $9,000 has been 
raised to build a church. In Holyoke the church was organized in July, 
with forty-one members, and some twenty have been added. In Fall 
River the church was organized in September, with thiity-eight mem- 
bers, and it now has a membership of sixty-three. In each case there is 
every prospect of further increase. In Ware, where there has been for 
some time a mission, it is probable that a movement toward a church 
will be made soon. Our French preach eis are about to issue a weekly 
newspaper in the interests of their work. Our French Protestant 
College at Lowell has had a successful year, and is only hindered by 
lack of funds from increasing greatly in the number of students. Many 
applications for admission have been denied because of lack of accom- 
modation. If money could be had for the building or hiring of suitable 
buildings, this great work would go forward rapidly to a notable success. 
The two Swedish missionaries have been warmly welcomed by their 
countrymen in their ministrations, and very hearty acknowledgments of 
the favor done and blessing received are made by the Swedish congre- 
gations in different parts of the State. The German preachers at Holyoke 
and Adams have faithfully held out the pure word of truth, and at Adams 
many have united with the Congregational church. 

" The Gospel Tent work in Boston was carried on by Rev. E. W. 
Bliss, as last year, and further effort in City Evangelization is made 
by sustaining regular services at Field's Corner, in Dorchester, where 
the success already attained warrants the expectation that a self- 
supporting church will before many years be established. 

" Rev. Wm. G. Puddefoot, of Traverse City, Mich., spent the month 
of February in this State making addresses in behalf of Home Missions 
with special reference to the burdensome debt of the National Society. 
His vivid sketches of the life and work of a Home Missionary, and graphic 
statements of the need of Home Missionaries, had a telling effect upon 
his audiences everywhere. His services were greatly in demand and 
were highly appreciated. The results were not so large in immediate 
contributions as they will doubtless be in permanent interest in the work 
to which, in its value and power, he opened so many eyes. 

" "While there is much yet to be desired in appreciation of the work, 
and the need of the American Home Missionary Society by the men and 
women in our churches, yet it is pleasant to notice from time to time 
an increasing heartiness in the welcome given to the appeals of this 
Society. Many prayers are to-day being offered that the year may yet 
be closed without debt. The gifts, even when small, that accompany 
these prayers seem somehow to contain a sort of promise of and almost 
potency toward this desirable result." 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 105' 

RHODE ISLAND HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Hon. Rowland Hazard, President; Rev. Secretary; 

Edwin Barrows, Esq., Treasurer. Office in Providence. 

The Receiptsof this Auxiliary within the year ending February 28th were: 

From churches and individuals .$3,703 87 

Income from invested funds l:;i; 50 

-13,840 37 
The National Society received from churches and individuals in Rhode 

Island for the national work, within the year ending March 31st.... 6,!)N7 78 

Total amount raised in the State, in cash, for Home Missions $10,828 15 

The Auxiliary expended in its own field, for missionary labor and ex- 
penses, within the year ending February 28th 3,011 74 

The Auxiliary paid into the treasury of the National Society, in cash, 

for the national work, within the year ending March 31st 753 00 

Nine missionaries have been in the service of this Society, during the 
whole or part of the year, in connection with eight churches and four 
out- stations. Forty-one have been added to the churches on confession, 
and eighteen by letter, making a total membership in the churches of 
nearly 570. Eight Sunday-schools report a membership of 918. 

MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF CONNECTICUT. 

Rev. William II. Moore, Secretary; Ward W. Jacobs, Esq., Treasurer. Office 

in Hartford. 

The Receipts of this Auxiliary within the year ending February 28th were : 

From churches and individuals .$15,017 80 

From legacies 224 54 

Income from invested funds 60 00' 

$15,302 34 
The National Society received from churches and individuals in Con- 
necticut for the national work, within the year ending March 31st. 46,588 44 

Total amount raised in the State, in cash, for Home Misssions.... $61,890 78 
The Auxiliary expended in its own field, for missionary labor and ex- 
penses, within the year ending February 28th 14,057 02 

The Auxiliary paid into the treasury of the National Society, in cash, 

for the national work, within the year ending March 31st 2,864 84 

The Secretary reports that fifty men were commissioned, including 
five licentiates, and that their service amounted for forty years. 

" The aided churches are in general in a good condition. 

"We regard the five General Missionaries as quite an important 
accession to our forces. Mr. Hanbroe works for nothing, and seems 
glad to follow the service under the encouragement he gets from us 
toward meeting his expenses. Mr. Ahnstrom is now pastor of the 
Swedish Church in New Britain and is also, so far as he is able, a Gen- 
eral Missionary. No member of his church or congregation has a dollar 
of taxable property, but they pledge $425 for his support. Mr. Erixon 



106 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

is useful in about twenty-five places which he visits in Connecticut. Mr. 
Hantel finds all the work he can manage among the Germans. Mr. 
Reed is in constant demand, and, while no revival of marked extent has 
occurred under his labors among us, he seems to be acceptable and use- 
ful everywhere. In addition to the salaries of these General Missiona- 
ries, we pay their official expenses. The sympathy of our people is so 
largely with the National Society in its indebtedness, that we shall not 
be surprised if we find ourselves in debt to our own missionaries at the 
close of the first quarter of our year." 

NEW YORK HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Rev.Wn. A. Robinson, D,D., President; Rev. Charles C.Creegan, D.D., Syracuse, 
Secretary; Rev. Alexander H. Clapf, D.D., New York, Treasurer. 

The Receipts of this Society from New York and that part of Penn- 
sylvania under its care were $16,622.85. Seventy-five missionaries have 
been in commission, during the whole or a part of the year, in connec- 
tion with 155 churches and stations. One missionary has been supply- 
ing a congregation of colored people ; eleven preach to two Welsh con- 
gregations; and one is now engaged in a general missionary work 
among the Spanish- speaking population. Two churches have reached 
self-support, and three have been organized. Seven houses of worship 
have been built, and thirteen repaired. Eight Sunday-schools have been 
organized. 

The following are extracts from the annual report of the Trustees : 

" We observe that many of our churches have been visited with the baptism of 
the Holy Spirit which has greatly quickened the membership, and in some cases large 
numbers have been added on confession of faith. It is a significant fact that almost 
without exception the giving churches have been visited with revivals, while those 
taking but little or no interest in the work of missions have had no conversions. So 
nearly do these two things run parallel that it can be considered a law, admitting 
of but few exceptions, that the church which takes a deep interest in the work of 
savino- the world at home and abroad — the church which consecrates its money to 
Christ will see the conversion of souls — while the organization having the name of 
a church which lives only for itself is sure of a speedy death. 

" Some of our missionary churches make too low an estimate of their own abil- 
ity to support the church. Where the number of givers is small there must of 
course be a burden in raising the minister's support which somebody must feel, and 
it is very natural for men to get clear of what is burdensome. Often the assump- 
tion is made that aid must be received from the Home Missionary Society or the 
church will perish, when the fact is, that if a faithful effort were made, the church 
would not only be self-supporting but able to contribute considerable sums to the 
several missionary societies. 

" Some of the dependent churches have made no progress in strength, have 
had no revivals for years, and are as weak and helpless to-day as they were when 
they first came to the conclusion that they were unable to support themselves. If 
the people can support the gospel with a reasonable amount of self-sacrifice, then it 
is their duty to do so, and a call for aid under such circumstances is a sin and 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 107 

shame. Let such churches remember that the money which comes into our treas- 
ury is often given by those who are making severe self-denial. Then, too.it should 
be borne in mind thai the money wasted in such fields means just so much less for 
those rapidly growing communities on the frontier where, in human view, far more 
Important results would be obtained. 

"The Trustees have under consideration the question of employing a trust- 
worthy Evangelist, and are now in correspondence with a gentleman of large and 
successful experience who will probably lie engaged for this work. Such a man 
as we have in mind will be in demand by the self-supporting churches at least half 
his time, and the remainder of the time he will give to work among pastorless 
■churches and other fields in special need of such services. 

"As a. denomination we have always insisted upon unity of effort among 
Christians of every name and have been opposed to the needless multiplication of 
churches. During the year we have had several examples of the practical work- 
ings of our theory. In a little village in Central New York there are two churches 
which have been in existence for many years. One of them is a Congregational 
church, the other is a church of the Lord Jesus Christ having another name — 
neither Society was provided with a suitable place of worship, and neither was 
able to erect a church home without outside help. God put it into the heart of a 
•Congregational deacon in New York city, who had spent his boyhood in this com- 
munity, to give a helping hand to these worthy people whose means were limited, 
lie offered to be responsible for one-half the entire costof a new church, provided 
the two societies should be permitted to use the house. The edifice was built and 
dedicated free from debt, and in the mean time the people had come to love each 
other and the minister preaching to them, so that they were led to say, ' What need 
is there of two preachers in this community?' As no satisfactory answer could be 
given to this question they have gone on together in the spirit of brotherly love 
and are likely to do so for years to come, although neither denomination has given 
up its organization. The spirit manifested in this little community is wise — in 
every sense of the word Christian. Would that it might become contagious and 
sweep over the whole countrj', reducing by scores and hundreds the weak and use- 
Less churches and leaving only those which are strong to do the Master's work. 

'• We see in the rapid growth of the foreign element among us, perils which 
threaten the stability of our free institutions. It is becoming more and more aliving 
•question, which must receive the attention of all thoughtful Christians : ' How can 
we Christianize and Americanize these elements ?' Some say they can all be Ameri- 
canized if we will only give them a hearty welcome when they come to our land. 
It is difficult to see that we have in any way failed to welcome them. Upon the 
other hand, have we not been too ready to make them a part of the body politic, to 
give them positions of power and influence before they had caught the spirit of 
our institutions. It is a fair question if it would not be best to require every man 
to wait twenty-one years after making his home in this country before he is per- 
mitted to exercise the privilege of suffrage. We who are born in America are 
obliged to wait that period of time, and it is a fair question why the foreigners 
should have any better opportunities in this direction than we enjoy. Let us do 
what we can to gather them into our churches, to make them welcome when they 
come; let us try to bring them to Christ, to build them up in him through the 
Christian agencies already organized, and let us organize others when necessary. 
It may be we shall not have remarkable success with those who are of adult years, 
-and who, perhaps, have already embraced views that are directly contrary to the 
teachings of the Bible ; but we may have large success with the young people and 
especially with the children. There is a wonderful economy in the work of evan- 



108 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

gelizing the masses when we take hold of the children, gathering them into our 
churches and Sunday-schools, and teaching them the way of life. In many cases 
we shall labor in vain unless we have missionaries especially prepared to preach to 
these people, and when necessary in their own language. 

" We have twenty-five missionaries preaching to Welsh congregations in New 
York and Eastern Pennsylvania. We have a missionary laboring among the 
Spanish-speaking people in New York city and Brooklyn, and recently a very 
flourishing church composed of Swedes has been organized in Brooklyn. This is 
all that has been done thus far in our field. 

"When we consider the following facts we can see the need of greatly enlarg- 
ing our work in this direction. In this State 24 per cent, of the population is 
foreign-born, and when the children are included we find the foreign element is 53 
per cent, of the entire population. In New York city 40 per cent, of the people 
are foreign-born, and including the children we find the foreign element in that 
great city to be 87 per cent. In Albany the foreign element is 57 per cent., and for 
all the large cities of the State the figures would be almost the same. He must be 
blind who cannot see that the influences for evil at work among them, intemper- 
ance, Sabbath breaking, superstition, vice, infidelity, anarchism, are vastly more 
active and influential than any influences for good which the Christian church has 
thus far brought to bear. 

" We must save these people or they will ruin us, or if not us, our children. 
We must go to them in the right spirit, our hearts on fire with love for them and 
with strong faith that there is power in the gospel of Christ to save them. 

"With one-half of the population of the Empire State in cities of over eight 
thousand inhabitants, one-fourth of our people in the United States in cities, one- 
third of our population foreign-born, or the children of foreign-born parents, and 
the large portion of this foreign population in the great cities — from these facts we 
can see the importance of this department of the work. This tendency to cen- 
tralization of population is sure to continue until we have a very much larger 
percentage of our population in cities than we now have. 

" Three years ago at the meeting of. the American Home Missionary Society at 
Saratoga, the following resolution was adopted : 

" ' Resolved, That the Executive Committee be instructed to consider the ad- 
visability of making a special appropriation for an enlarged work of evangelization 
in our great cities, and to report the result of their deliberations and of their exper- 
iments, if they inaugurate any, to the next annual meeting of the Society.' 

"As one of the Auxiliaries of the National Society we can report some progress 
in the matter of city evangelization. During the last five years this Society has 
given special attention to work in cities and growing villages, and although we 
have only begun to do this work, yet the success we have had is very encouraging. 
Churches have been started in New York, Brooklyn, Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, 
Ogdensburg, Watertown, and several other places. These movements, with 
scarcely an exception, have been very successful. 

" Of the twenty -five churches formed in the State during the last five years 
almost all of them are located in cities or large and growing villages. The present 
membership of these churches is nearly 2,000, an increase of 92 per cent, since 
their organization, and the aggregate of the congregations in connection with these 
new churches is about 2,500, and there are 3,300 pupils in the Sunday-schools. 

" These new societies own property worth $150,000. Surely the experiment 
which we have made in this State during the last five years should encourage us to 
enter upon this work on a wider scale and with better methods. Is it not time for 
us to cease holding before us, as the chief end of our work, the establishment of 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 109 

flourishing churches which will soon reach self-support? There are wards in all 
our large cities where self-supporting churches are an impossibility. Whal -hall 

he done for these?" 

I : A STERN PENNSYLVAN I A . 

Rev. Cii.uu.es C. Creegan, D.D., Syracuse, N. Y., Superintendent. 

Nineteen missionaries have been in commission, during the whole or 
a part of the year, ministering to thirty-six churches and stations. The 
Welsh people are largely represented in the membership and attendance 
at service. In some instances, they comprise the church and congrega- 
tion. Two hundred and forty-one additions on confession, and fifty- 
eight by letter, have been reported. Thirteen missionaries report 198 
hopeful conversions. One Sunday-school has been organized, and twen- 
ty-six schools report a membership of 2,465. The receipts from the field 
have been $4,584.69. 

'•In regard to Eastern Pennsylvania," says the Secretary, "it is pleas- 
ant to report an encouraging degree of progress. During the last five 
years there have been eighteen churches organized in Eastern Pennsyl- 
vania. Their aggregate membership is 1,387; aggregate in congrega- 
tions 2,768, with 1,755 in the Sunday-school. These new churches 
own property worth $58,000. Taking into consideration that all of 
these people are wage-workers, most of them working in the mines, we 
are greatly encouraged by the result. 

" It is doubtful whether there is a more fruitful missionary field, so 
far as our denomination is concerned, to be found in this country. These 
Welsh people are largely Christians, and a goodly number of them Con- 
gregationalists, before they come to this country. All they need is a lit- 
tle encouragement, and they will soon fall in line." 

OHIO HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Rev. Henry M. Texxey, President ; Rev. John G. Fraser, Cleveland, Secretary ; 
Rev. Alexander H. Clapp, D.D., New York, Treasurer. 

The field of this Society includes Ohio and such portions of Western 
Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Kentucky, as are within the limits of 
the General Conference of Ohio. 

The Treasurer reports that the amount raised for Home Missions, in- 
cluding the " Bohemian Mission work " in Cleveland, in this field, during 
the year ending March 31st, is $11,277.87. (Individuals and churches, 
$10,131.86. Legacies, $1,146.01.) The expenditures have been (includ- 
ing the *' Bohemian Mission work ") $11,698.58. 

Forty- one missionaries have been in commission within the bounds of 
this District, during the whole or a part of the year, performing twenty- 
nine years of service in connection with seventy-nine churches and out- 
stations. Twenty-five of them have labored in Ohio, four in Western 



110 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

Pennsylvania, and two in West Virginia. Twenty-one missionaries re- 
port 229 hopeful conversions. In all, 196 have been added to the 
churches on confession, and eighty-six by letter. 

"Home Missionary work in Ohio," says the Secretary, "has outgrown 
that first stage of romance which attaches to frontiers and new begin- 
nings, and which still belongs to Northern Michigan and Dakota and 
Utah, and has not yet fully entered into that sadder second stage in which 
the old ruins are carefully tended and rebuilt, with tears that the glory is 
not as at first. The Ohio work is pre-eminently prosaic and matter of 
fact. To this, its general characteristic, must be added the uncomforta- 
ble fact that for some reason, over the philosophy of which wise men dis- 
agree, the Ohio churches have never taken upon them the full burden 
and blessing of their heritage, but still linger far behind their neighbors, 
East and West, in the average of their offerings for Home Missions. The 
faithful work the late Secretary bas done, in striving to make the Congre- 
gational churches and Christians of Ohio understand their mission and 
their opportunity, his successor seeks to continue ; and will count it his 
best token of success, if it shall appear through their offerings that they 
have taken the work upon their hearts. 

" The year has been in the main uneventful, with about the usual 
amount of quiet and unheralded work, One faithful missionary of the 
Society, Rev. Albert M. Wheeler, for five years paetor of the Second 
church, Toledo (his first and only pastorate), died just at the opening of 
the year, of consumption, in his thirty-first year. He was a devoted and 
successful pastor, and continued his work far beyond the limit of his fail- 
ing strength. His church cherishes his memory. 

"A year ago the Society was just making experiment with the services 
of a General Missionary, Rev. Robert Quaife. He has now been over a 
year in this service, and results already fully justify the wisdom of his 
appointment. During the summer he did pastoral service for a small 
city church in a trying and critical stage of its history, and prepared it 
for the coming of a pastor who has since lifted it out of the slough of 
debt, and put new life into it. Mr. Quaife has served other churches for 
briefer periods, in aid of the pastors, with equally happy, though differ- 
ing, results. One which was reported a few years age, as having lost 
sixty- one members by death and removal in thirteen years, and which 
was reduced to a handful of members, and an afternoon preaching service^ 
for which it could raise only $100, has received over twenty- five mem- 
bers, quadruples its offering for ministerial support, adds a house to it, 
and with a little aid from the Society has a pastor to itself. In a church 
just organized in the suburbs of Cleveland, with fifteen members, neai'ly 
fifty conversions are reported, and more than half that number of acces- 
sions to the church. Much work, for future years, has also been done 
among children and young people. 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. Ill 

"The work of the Cleveland Bohemian Mission, which sustains to 
the Society the relation of a church, has been deeply interesting during 
the past year, and is constantly enlarging." 

ILLINOIS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Hcv. Edward P. Goodwin, D.D., President ; Rev. James Tompkins, Secretary; 
Aaron B. Mead, Esq., Treasurer. Office in Chicago. 

The Receipts of this Auxiliary for Home Missions, within the year 

ending March 31st, were 613,301 03 

The National Society received from churches arid individuals in Illi- 
nois, for the national work, within the year ending March 31st... 2,255 02 

Total amount raised in the State, in cash, for Home Missions.^. $15,646 05 
The Auxiliary expended on its own field for missionary labor and ex- 
penses, within the year ending March 31st 14,509 35 

The Auxiliary paid into the treasury of the National Society, in cash, 

for the national work, within the year ending March 31st 200 00 

Sixty missionaries have been under commission, during the whole 
or a part of the year, in connection with seventy churches and thirteen 
out-stacions. The Secretary in his report says : 

" The labors of evangelists employed have been blessed to the con- 
version of many souls, and the strengthening of a number of churches. 
The results of evangelistic labor more and more clearly demonstrate 
that this is the best method of quickly bringing churches to self-sup- 
port. The wisdom and duty of employing men for this special line of 
work, can no longer be questioned. The communities in which our 
evangelists have labored the past year may be classified as follows : 
Churches aided, 15; churches not aided, 41; fields destitute of 
churches 11 ; total 70 — of which 18 churches were pastorless. One 
of the evangelists was commissioned for special work, as General Mis- 
sionary in Southern Illinois. This is the part of the State first settled. 
The pioneers were from the so-called Southern States. Most of the 
churches and other institutions were of the southern type. But the 
present generation has a determined spirit of progress. Even in the 
more neglected portions of that region (and there are thousands in 
some localities where there are neither churches nor Sunday-schools) 
the people are eager for the gospel of Christ in its purity and power. 
Especially do they desire churches organized on the New Testament 
plan, self-governing under the one Master. The people who have been 
accustomed to different polities come together on this broad, evangeli- 
cal basis. So in this part of our State we find a large ' Congregational 
element,' not only ready but anxious to be organized into aggressive 
churches. One church recently organized sustains four Sunday-schools 
in the region around. 

'' To meet the emergency which is so often occasioned by the 



112 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

diminished contributions of the summer months, our treasurer pro- 
posed to the churches of the State the raising of a permanent fund, 
of at least $5,000, to be invested in first class securities, and to be 
used as collateral in borrowing money to pay missionaries, the interest 
of the same being used to pay the interest on the borrowed money, 
the fund itself to remain intact. The above-named amount has not all 
been secured; but it is hoped that it will be before the meeting of the 
State Association and the annual meeting of the Society. 

" The Board of Directors had planned for an enlargement of the 
work in the State, the vote of the churches warranting such a move- 
ment. But the contributions did not correspond with the votes ; 
hence but little enlargement was made. The receipts are less than for 
the preceding year, and so we close with a deficit of $1,272.03. 

" The work of our State evangelists, which has been carried on so 
successfully for the past five years, has been somewhat interfered with 
by a change of laborers. Rev. Hiram D. Wiard, the senior evangelist, 
was appointed Home Missionary Superintendent for Southern Dakota, 
and entered on duty, June 1st, 1886. Rev. John D. McCord was called 
to take charge of the Armour Mission, in connection with Plymouth 
Church, Chicago, May 1st, 1886." 

WISCONSIN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Rev. Chaeles H. Riciiaeds, D.D., President; Rev. Thomas G. Geassie, Milwau- 
kee, Secretary; R. A. McCuxlotjgh, Esq., Milwaukee, Treasurer. 

The receipts of this Auxiliary for Home Missions, within the year 
ending February 28th, were : 

From churches and individuals $16,094 02 

From legacies 100 00 

From invested funds 133 20 

From other sources 348 33 

$16,675 55 
The National Society received from churches and individuals in Wis- 
consin, for the national work, within the year ending March 31st. 2,732 64 

Total amount raised in the State, in cash, for Home Missions... $19,408 19 
The Auxiliary expended on its own field, tor missionary labor and ex- 
penses, within the year ending February 28th 10,893 02 

In this State there have been seventy one churches, and at least forty 
out-stations supplied. Fifty- four missionaries have been in commission 
during the whole or part of the year. This is an increase, compared 
with last year, of seventeen churches and eight missionaries. One new 
church has been formed, and several fields occupied by our missionaries 
are nearly ready for the organizatisn of others. The Secretary reports 
that " Much of the work of the past year has been the restoring of 
churches long dismantled and pastorless, rendered so for lack of home 
missionary funds to sustain them. This is as expensive a work as the 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 113 

forming of new churches. It is as valuable, since a dead man restored 
to life is worth as much as a child new-born, and it requires as much 
divine power to effect it. This work of resurrection has been prosecuted 
to such a degree that we have now in the State fewer abandoned 
churches than we have bad for many years. 

" Before the beginning of last year the necessity for a great enlarge- 
ment of our work so pressed the Society that it passed and published a 
strong appeal to the churches calling for a large increase of contributions. 
To enforce this appeal unusual efforts were made to engage the interest 
of the churches, by printed information, by conventions, and by appeals in 
the pulpits. A special home missionary conference of the State was 
called at Madison, which was largely attended by both ministers and lay- 
men. At this important meeting the special problem of our State was very 
thoroughly considered and it manifestly had a great influence. In re- 
sponse to these efforts the churches came to realize with new vividness 
the greatness and difficulty of the home missionai'y problem in Wiscon- 
sin, the more than forty churches pastorless and sinking, the wide tracts 
in thickly settled regions, township after township, wholly destitute of 
churches, and especially the sudden and surprising development of 
North Wisconsin, into which people are crowding with great rapidity. 
Perhaps there is, at present, no section of the United States where pop- 
ulation is so fast increasing, where towns, cities, railroads, docks, eleva 
tors, saw mills, mines, spring into being with such magic rapidity, and 
where the beckon of God's hand so commands the church to enter at 
once. 

" These considerations have impressed our churches as never before 
with a sense of the utter inadequacy of the paltry $10,000 which was all 
we have had to expend on our great and important State. It was the 
unanimous decision that we must enlarge our plans, redouble our efforts, 
and consequently redouble our expenditure of money. It was deter- 
mined to increase largely our own giving and at the same time, in order 
to save the New North so suddenly thrown upon us, to ask the National 
Society to relieve us for the present of that unexpected increase of our 
burden. This request the National Society acceded to and co-operated 
heartily in the formation of the sub- district of North Wisconsin — the 
territory included in which remains still under the direction and purview 
of the Wisconsin Society, while commissions and funds are supplied by 
the National Society. This was a wise change and the urgent necessity 
of it is now fully demonstrated. The Rev. Geo. A. Hood was appointed 
to the superintendency of the sub-district and under his enterprising 
direction the work is efficiently carried on. To get the needed increase 
of funds from our own churches a strong appeal was sent out, and in re- 
sponse an unusual enthusiasm was roused throughout the State. The 
ministers stirred up the churches. The result was an increase of contri- 



114 THE HOME MISSIONAKY. July, 

butions twenty-five per cent, above oar previous high rate, reaching, for 
the fiscal year of our State Society, the sum of $1.01 per resident mem- 
ber. 

" Besides these contributions from the churches a generous friend of 
the Society gave $5,000 to be funded and used as collateral on which to 
borrow, if ever the Treasury ran empty, and so relieve our missionaries 
from bearing the sole brunt of the evil. It is also the hope of the donor 
'that it may prove a nucleus to which other sums maybe added by benev- 
olent Christians in our State, and thus in time an endowment fund be 
formed.' 

' fc A most valuable adjunct to the usual work of the Society the past 
year has been the employment of State Evangelists working under the 
direction of the Society. Two have engaged in this work, Rev. Geo. W. 
Nelson, for the whole year, and Rev. T. W. Cole for some months of it. 
Their work has proved the exceeding efficiency and economy of this 
agency in home missionary operations." 

NORTH. WISCONSIN. 
Rev. George A. Hood, Ashland, Superintendent. 
Mr. Hood reports that eight fields have been worked by eight differ- 
ent missionaries, including three students. The contributions to the So- 
ciety have been $65.65, and the expense of the work, since June 1st, is 
$2,137.06. Washburn church has assumed self-support; Rhinelander has 
built a church ; Bloomer and Rhinelander have had revival interest. 

"The Society has begun work in this new field none too soon. The 
necessity reported last year has increased. This report covers only six 
months of the Superintendent's work, and for four months of that time 
not a single suitable man could be found for the vacant fields. I have 
been saving what was begun, and preparing for the new. But begin "3 
nings do not show in statistics. Let me restate the urgency of this 
work by calling it " a model home missionary field." 

" 1. It is the nearest and newest frontier. The continent has been 
explored by the Pacific Railroads, and the ' ground floor ' chances taken. 
Now, investors are hunting out the corners which have been skipped in 
the westw T ard rush. In North Wisconsin they find the untasted oppor- 
tunities of the Far West, and all are the more eager because the 
opportunity is so near home. 

" 2. The rapid increase of population in three or four years from al- 
most nothing to one-eighth of the whole State. The most rapid growth 
of Dakota is being repeated here. Four railroads are here, and five 
more are being built now, among them the strongest companies of the 
Northwest. 

" 3. Permanency. Other States are imperial and famous for their 
specialties — for timber, or mines, or stock raising, or grain, or scenery^ 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 115 

but North Wisconsin lias each of these with an abundance which would 
mark it as a specialty. The Gogebic iron mines are called inexhausti- 
ble, and the ore is of the very best. Pine covers the north half of the 
State, and mills, said to be the largest in the world, are built here to 
saw it up. Our hardwood timber, mixed in with the pine, is carried off 
by logging crews from Wisconsin factories. Wherever a clearing lets 
the sun in, good crops of oats are raised by merely harrowing among 
the stumps ; timothy grows rank without even this care ; vegetables 
yield amazingly. Fancy stock farms are begun. So, if ever the lum- 
bering towns saw all the pine, or the hardwood is all manufactured into 
woodenware and charcoal, or the mining towns exhaust their ore, there 
is still a fourth crop of riches in the soil itself, and these towns will 
become prosperous centers for the model life of a rich farming com- 
munity. 

''Lakes Superior and Michigan, with their cheap shipping and fish- 
eries, are no small item in our future. Beautiful brooks of speckled 
trout, and lakes full of other fish, hidden in woods where bears are 
found and deer abound, make this our Western Adirondacks. 

" 4. It will pay. This is a paradise for the capitalist, and for the 
poor man, too, who can make more wages in the woods in winter than 
by farming in summer. Immense fortunes have been made in a year. 
Investors from Boston to Montana, especially from Chicago, Milwau- 
kee, and Minneapolis, swarm here. The ear wearies of mines, stocks, 
acres, and blast furnaces., corner lots and brick blocks, railroads and 
timber, ties, piles, docks and elevators. Gain the whole world — never 
mind the soul. But tee mast mind their souls. These 'rustlers' seem 
to be natural Congregationalists. They like our style of work — evan- 
gelistic, business-like. Everywhere I go they want a Congregational 
minister. Not much will be required for each church here, if we can 
get ministers worthy of the opportunity. We cannot be too quick 
about it, either. ' The nick of time ' applies here. It will only need a 
good stock of men and money, and we can do much toward securing 
these strong souls for the kingdom, and their treasures for heaven." 

IOWA HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Rev. Teuman O. Douglass, Grinnell, Secretary; J. II. Merrill, Esq., Des Moines, 

Treasurer. 
The Receipts of this Auxiliary for Home Missions, within the year end- 
ing February 38th, were: 

From churches and individuals -*10,464 71 

From legacies 400 00 

$10,864 71 
The National Society received from churches and individuals in Iowa, 

for the national work, within the year ending March 31st 1,501 17 

Total amount raised in the State, in cash, for Home Missions $12,365 88 



116 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

The Auxiliary expended on its own field, for missionary labor and ex- 
penses, within the year ending February 28th 10,953 56 

This Auxiliary lias bad in its service seven ty-nine missionaries dur- 
ing the whole or a part of the year, performing 1 forty -nine years of 
service, in connection with eighty-one churches and about forty out- 
stations. The Secretary reports : "During the year we have organized 
eleven churches, as follows : at Bethel, Berwick, Castana, Elk Creek, 
Ellsworth, La Moille, Larchwood, Number Five, Pieasant Prairie, 
Prairie Hill and Washta. Five missionary churches dedicated houses 
of worship, viz.: Baxter, Bethel, Jewell Junction, Pleasant Prairie and 
Sioux City (Pilgrim). Six self-supporting churches also dedicated 
houses of worship. Home missionary parsonages were secured at 
Arlington, Berwick, Clarion, and Sioux City (Pilgrim Church), and the 
parsonage at Sherrill's Mound was greatly improved and erlai-ged. 

" The names of the churches, and of their pastors that have come to 
self-support, should be written large so that other pastors and churches 
may ' see their good works? Our 'Calebs and Joshuas' this year are : 
Rev. John M. Cummings, of Anita; Rev. G. M. D. Slocum, of Gilrnan and 
Newburg; Rev. Robert "W Jamison, of Cromwell: Rev. Oliver P. Champ- 
lin, of Emmetsburg, Rev. John F. Home, of Independence, and Rev. 
Robert W. Hughes, of Polk City, Berwick, Crocker Center, and Prairie 
Hill. 

" The Society has had in the field three Evangelists. Rev. J. S. 
N orris was engaged the whole year, Rev. H. M. Skeels four months, and 
Rev. Jacob Klossner (German) three months. It is safe to say that 
under the labors of these brethren there were not less than one thou- 
sand hopeful conversions and six hundred additions to our churches. 

"The foregoing figures certainly show that the year has been a fruit- 
ful one. Enlargement has come to our denomination and to the King- 
dom of God within our borders. These fifty years of home missionary 
service packed into this one year have had something to do with the en- 
largement, and we have done something with the regions around and 
beyond us. For the abundant harvest of the year, thanks to the faith- 
ful workers, and thanks to the Lord of the harvest ! 

" But the end is not yet. The Society carries a heavy burden. Of 
all our 260 churches there are scarcely 100 that are really self-support- 
ing. Any one of 150 churches rnay at any time send in an application 
for aid. Some of them are doomed to slow growth and smallness, but 
are doing good work, are giving of their strength to the stronger 
churches, and ought to be sustained. Our mottoes are ' Let no candle- 
stick be removed out of its place,' and, whenever possible, ' Rebuild the 
old altars and rekindle the fires thereof.' New work also presses. The 
population thickens. New railroads are being built and new towns are 
springing up. Portions of Iowa are as new as Dakota. We do not need 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 117 

to seek work nor to ' elbow' our way through the denominations. More 
work comes to our hand than we know how to take care of. Many calls 
must go unheeded. The work, so laid upon us by the providence and 
Spirit of God that we dare not refuse it, that alone do we accept. Oh, 
for more money and more 'men for this home missionary service !" 

MARYLAND, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, AND 

GEORGIA. 

Sixteen missionaries and teachers have been under commission 
during the whole or a part of the year, viz : 

Maryland. — Rev. "William C. Jones, at Frostburg, with Ocean Mines 
and Allegany as out-stations, labored through the year. He reports 
sixty church-members, including thirteen additions. Seventeen conver- 
sions, and 158 in the Sunday-school. 

District of Columbia, — Rev. Robert Nourse, at Washington, D. C, 
labored for three months as pastor of the Tabernacle Congregational 
Church. His successor, Rev. William C. Scofield, performed six months' 
service and reports fifty-three church-members, and 200 scholars in the 
Sunday-school. 

Rev. Charles H. Small, at Mount Pieasaut, where a Congregational 
church has been organized, reports twenty-nine church-members and 
10 J scholars in the Sunday-school. 

Virginia. — Rev. Frederick W. Tuckerman, at Falls Church, with Mer- 
rifield as an out-station, reports sixty-one church-members, and two Sun- 
day-schools with fifty five scholars. 

Rev. Javan K. Mason, at Herndon, reports seventy-two church-mem- 
bers and 105 scholars in the Sunday-school. 

Tennessee. — Rev. J. H. Frazee, at Knoxville, labored part of the year 
with the newly organized Pilgrim Congregational Church. Rev. Ed- 
mund L. Hood succeeded him, in October, 1886, and reports twenty- three 
church- members and seventy scholars in the Sunday-school. 

Rev. Lewis Morgan, in service with the Welsh churches at Soddy and 
Rock Creek, reports seventy-six church-members, including twenty-seven 
additions ; sixteen conversions, and 130 scholars in the Sunday-school. 

Georgia. — Rev. Zachary Eddy, D.D., in connection with the Church 
of the Redeemer, at Atlanta, reports 127 church-members and eighty- 
five scholars in the Sunday-school. Rev. William Shaw, in service 
with the Berean Church, Atlanta, reports 142 church-members, 250 
scholars in the Sunday-school, and a season of revival with fifty conver- 
sions. Rev. Jacob Fiook supplied the Grace Congregational Church in 
the same city, which was organized within the year, and reports thirty- 
nine church-members and 100 scholars in the Sunday-school ; house of 
worship built. 



118 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

Mr. H. B. Smith labored part of the year as a missionary teacher at 
the Immanuel Mission ; forty-seven scholars attended the school. Dr. 
A. C. Denham, in service as missionary teacher with the Berean Mission, 
reports eighty scholars as attending the school. Mrs. J. F. Robie and 
Miss M. B. Gaston labored part of the year as missionary teachers in 
connection with the Berean and West End Sunday and day schools, and 
report an average attendance of over 130 scholars. 

FLORIDA. 
Rev. Sullivan F. Gale, Jacksonville, Superintendent. 

Twenty-six missionaries have labored in this State, during the whole 
or a part of the year, ministering to fifty-seven churches and out-stations, 
and reporting a membership of 539, including additions of fifty-eight on 
confession and sixty-four by letter. Eight churches, and four Sunday- 
schools have been organized. Thirty- two schools report a membership 
of 1,114. The Superintendent writes : 

" This is the third full year reported, a fractional year having been re- 
ported three years ago, and this report is the first since tae general mis- 
sionary work of Florida became independent of the pastorate of the 
Jacksonville church. 

"But at the very time when a more aggressive movement was thus 
made possible, came the orders not to undertake any new work whatso- 
ever, but to economize and retrench. The result in this field has been 
that, as against the thirteen new men who entered the State last year, 
not a new missionary has been employed ; that churches already organ- 
ized, with others since organized on fields that had been occupied prior 
to the orders referred to, have been served, some of them at least, in a 
temporary manner, and that the superintendency has been not a little 
diverted from much of the general care of work already undertaken, to 
say nothing of the exploration of new fields that have been offering the 
Macedonian prayer. 

'•But, as it is, the year has been one of some progress. The number 
of churches now in connection with the State Association is thirty-four, 
as against twenty-six a year ago. The gain of churches, all organized 
durino- the year, is eight. Last year it was thirteen. These churches, in 
membership, in strength of every kind, and in present and prospective 
usefulness, are similar to those organized at an earlier date, and in every 
instance they well illustrate the acceptableness and efficiency of the sim- 
ple Congregational way. They are the only evangelical churches in their 
several communities and happily unite in their organizations almost all 
the Christian forces of the vicinage. 

" The church in Jacksonville has joined the church in Winter Park on 
the independent list. Some others have made good progress towards 
this consummation. Interlachen, Port Orange, Pomona and Oak Hill 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 119 

have dedicated beautiful and commodious houses of worship. The year 
has been remarkable for the work of church erection. Besides the 
churches in the above-named places, no less than eight have been engaged 
in this necessary work. The fact that the Congregational churches of 
Florida now hold more than $50,000 of property is one of the evidences 
that Congregationalism is not experimenting here. 

"The State Association, composed almost exclusively of home mis- 
sionary churches, may be mentioned here as having prospered generally. 
At the annual meeting, held in Daytona last January, the Association was 
legally incorporated, it being desirable that it should be able to hold and 
administer property. The greatest pains was taken to do this work 
thoroughly and comprehensively, and it is believed that the Association 
and its annual meetings are perfectly guarded from secularization. The 
Congregational body of the State seems to have already well taken its 
place alongside of the general organizations of denominations which have 
been longer established here. At the last annual meeting a minute on 
'Comity' was adopted, and proposals on that subject were made to all 
other bodies in the State. This is wholly in the line of Christian wis- 
dom, good fellowship, and missionary efficiency, as set forth in the anni- 
versary paper on 'Denominational Co-operation.' The Sunday-school 
Assembly, mentioned in the last report, is now completing preparations 
for the first annual session. Grounds and buildings are being put in 
readiness. A ten days' programme has been announced, on which appear 
some of the best leaders, lecturers and workers in the country. The 
Executive Committee are likely, by their opening session, to establish at 
Mount Dora, in Orange County, the Chautauqua Assembly of South 
Florida. 

"The material development of Florida has not been so rapid during 
this as in recent years. The bad freeze of 1886 and the lighter tourist 
travel and sojourning cf this season have had something to do with 
this temporary retarding. Yet the year past has shown a large increase 
of railway building. There evidently is a great strife to secure the best 
Gulf ports, with a view to closer commercial relations with countiies 
reached by water to the southward. The railway development of the 
interior of the peninsula also, has been remarkable. This has a meaning 
for every missionary society. Great progress has been made in public 
education, a large increase being recorded for the year in the number of 
school-houses erected and of new schools instituted. A considerable ad- 
vance has been made in work intended to raise the standard of teachers' 
qualifications. The new State constitution is more favorable to generous 
provisions for education. The grand success of Rollins College, at Win- 
ter Park, under the presidency of Rev. Dr. E. P. Hooker, should be 
noted. With about $30,000 invested in the 'plant,' more room is 
needed and new buildings are to be erected. The beautiful site of ten 



120 THE HOME MISSIONAEY. July, 

acres is about to be increased by several acres more. This institution 
stands prominently at the head of Christian education in the State. With 
more extended acquaintance with this large field comes the profounder 
conviction that the missionai-y opportunity offered in Florida is grand, 
urgent, and, if improved, will be of far-reaching results to a degree not 
now understood or anticipated." 

MISSOURI, ARKANSAS, AND INDIAN TERRITORY. 
Rev. Franklin B. Doe, St. Louis, Superintendent. 
The total number of ministers bearing the Society's commission in 
the Southwest missionary district was seventy -three ; teachers fifteen. 
Two churches were organized in Missouri ; one in Curry, of twelve 
members, to yoke with Thayer; also Unity Church, in Miller County, 
of twenty-three members, to yoke with Iberia. Two houses of worship 
have been completed; several have been enlarged and repaired, and 
several parsonages secured. Two churches have become self-support- 
ing — Hyde Park, in St. Louis, and . Clyde, in Kansas City. These are 
marked cases of growth and success. One also in Arkansas (Little 
Rock) — the most signal example of rapid progress. Two young men 
were ordained; five ministers have been installed. Missouri gained 
438 in membership, and §3,675 in benevolences. Arkansas has gained 
about seventy-five in membership ; Indian Territory about forty. The 
improvement in quality all around is more evident than that in quan- 
tity. A spirit of harmony and mutual helpfulness prevails to a degree 
worthy of note. 

" Arkansas. — Eight churches ; nine missionaries commissioned, some 
for short periods. One church reached self-support. Six teachers have 
been commissioned. Little Rock carries off the palm ; a rare instance 
of success anywhere, especially in Arkansas. It is due in large measure 
to the popularity of the missionary. Knowing, as I do, how almost im- 
possible it was to make a start, owing chiefly to former abortive attempts, 
the result of the faith — or presumption, as some called it — is very grati- 
fying and encouraging. The church lot is now worth $7,500. To begin 
with nothing and in three years reach self-support and pay a salary of 
$1,800 — that is good enough. Eureka takes on new life and courage, 
pledging $110 per month toward the support of the pastor, buying 
a church lot for $450, and paying $340 of it. It has the largest congre- 
gation in the city and a Sunday-school of 110 members, and is growing. 
The Union should put $1,000 in that enterprise before next winter. 
Health seekers come there from all parts of the country. They now 
worship in Opera Hall and pay three dollars per month for the use of 
it. 

" The Rogers church has made substantial progress. They now have 
a Congregational minister, and are building a parsonage. The Academy 
reports the best year of its existence. ' 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 121 

"Rev. Victor E. Loba lias gone to Siloam, to take that and Cherokee. 
Not a very hopeful field, but one that we cannot abandon now. 

"Indian Territory. — Denominationally, this is our least promising 
field. But the work we have is doing well. We have eight churches, 
two of which are colored, and ouly four missionaries have been employed 
as pastors. The white work in McAllister and vicinity warrants a fair out- 
lay. The work among colored people, including the Sunday-schools and 
Wilberforce Iustitute, is of real value in elevating that people. Worcester 
Academy has made the best year in its history. The two terms just 
closed enrolled li>l members, eighty-five percent, of whom are of Indian 
blood. The work has required the entire time of six persons. The 
principal writes : ' I am confident that we have done better work than 
ever before in nearly every department.' 

" There are some obstacles," says Mr. Doe, " peculiar to this district, 
which endanger the work and make it difficult to manage. In some 
cases much patience is required. But there is much to work for and to 
hope for. Great progress will be made, the next twenty years, in our 
line. We are to have a substantial part in making Missouri what she is 
capable of becoming. The same is true of Arkansas, only the work must 
be slower. The slowness comes largely from the ignorance of the peo- 
ple. The vast timber regions have immense wealth in them and will at- 
tract Northern capital and industry. Railroads and schools will trans- 
form this State. I believe in the future of Arkansas. 

" While we have made considerable gain in the amount raised toward 
the support of pastors, there is still room for improvement in this line, 
and especially in the contributions to the Home Missionary and Union 
treasuries. Not less than $5,000 should be contributed to the former, 
and the contributions to the latter should be at least doubled. To se- 
cure this it is needful that missionary pastors, as well as others, edu- 
cate then- congregations in this grace and blessing. Some have done 
nobly the past year. Others are far behind their duty and privilege in 
this respect. We hope for a better record the coming year." 

With this brief summary, Mr. Doe calls attention to some details of 
each portion of the wide field: 

" Missouri. — Fifty-three missionaries have been in commission dur- 
ing the whole or a part of the year, ministering to eighty-six congrega- 
tions. The two churches organized are in the country, where there is 
no other church, and to yoke with existing churches, so that no addi- 
tional outlay is required. The two houses of worship, also, are in coun- 
try places where no others are within several miles. An unusual num- 
ber of sanctuaries have been enlarged and otherwise improved, such as 
Clyde, in Kansas City, Kidder, etc. There is a growing disposition to 
secure parsonages, which indicates a desire for more permanence in the 
pastorate. 



122 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

"The year has been one of substantial gain; not so much in start- 
ing new churches as in improving existing ones, end in gradually se- 
curing a higher grade of ministers." 

TEXAS AND LOUISIANA. 

Rev. Cyrus I. Scofield, Dallas, Texas, General Missionary. 

Eight missionaries have been in commission during the whole or a 
part of the year, in connection with fourteen churches and out-stations. 
Mr. Scofield reports : 

"Perhaps no part of the great home missionary field has suffered 
more from our inability to enter upon new work, than Texas. Just when 
the patient seed-sowing of many years, and the wise and far-seeing pol- 
icy of the late veteran Superintendent for this State, had borne the fruit 
of a wide and favorable knowledge of our polity, so that at least five of 
the larger and growing cities were ready for us, the discouraging com- 
mand came, ' No new work.' This is the more to be regretted, as Texas 
is just now in a greater degree than any other portion of the ' New 
South' in a malleable and formative state. Fifty-four Connecticuts in 
area, and already six Connecticuts in population, the estimates of the 
soberest statisticians as to her population and wealth in twenty years 
seem incredible, and it is certain that very largely what is left undone 
now cannot be done hereafter. 

" Still, the things which remain have been materially strengthened. 
One church — that in Dallas — has reached self-support and added fifty 
to its membership. The Palestine church, sorely tried last year by the 
removals and divisions incident to the great strike, is now stronger than 
ever. Paris has secured a pastor and is moving forward with courage 
and success. The great ' Panhandle,' larger than Indiana or Wisconsin, 
is receiving a large immigration from the North, and is already calling 
for our work. We ought at once to enter ten important fields. May 
the Lord send men and means !" 

In conclusion he says : 

"No part of the South is undergoing a more interesting or important 
development than Southwestern Louisiana. Lying beyond the flat allu- 
vial region adjacent to the Mississippi and its bayou system, is a rich 
prairie region, until recently sparsely settled with unprogressive Aca»- 
dians. The larger part of the land belongs still to the United States and 
State governments, and is attracting a large Northern immigration of 
the very best quality. 

" At Jennings, in this region, Superintendent Doe, while in charge of 
this department, stationed a missionary. As the result of his labors a 
church has been gathered, and a fine chapel (erected without outside 
aid) has been dedicated. To-day we have openings for five more 
ehurches in that region, and plans are far advanced for the erection of 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 123 

an academy at Lake Charles, to cost $20,000, which will be under con- 
trol of the Congregationalists of Texas and Louisiana. The enterprise 
is in strong hands and will not be suffered to fail." 

NEW MEXICO AND ARIZONA. 
Rev. Charles B. Sumneb, Las Vegas, New Mexico, Superintendent. 
Seventeen missionaries have been in commission during the whole 
or a part of the year, supplying thirty churches and out-stations. Over 
forty additions have been made to the church-membership. Eleven Sun- 
day-schools report GOO scholars. The Superintendent, Rev. G. B. Sum- 
ner, has resigned, and his successor has not yet been appointed. 

INDIANA. 

Rev. Ltjman P. Rose, Indianapolis, Superintendent. 

The receipts of tlieSociety from Indiana have been $352 56 

Seven missionaries have been under commission ; three only serving 
the whole year. The other four labored from four to ten months each, 
making a little over five years of service rendered; at a cost to the 
Society of $1,092. Their average salary was $188.57. They have sup- 
plied, wholly and in part, fourteen churches and four out-stations. Su- 
perintendent Rose writes: "The missionary work of the State, com- 
mitted virtually to six missionaries, including the Superintendent, em- 
braces twenty-nine churches and four out- stations. Special revival 
meetings have been held with eleven churches, at some of which there 
were remarkable evidences of the presence and power of the Holy Spirit. 
Others were greatly blessed, but the wide-spread influence and the im- 
mediate ingatherings to the church were not so manifest. It is just- 
to mention that two non-commissioned local missionaries have rendered 
valuable service by their voluntary assistance in the work. 

'• We gratefully acknowledge the merciful visitation of God's grace in 
giving to the missionary churches of Indiana 169 hopeful conversions ; 
and that 112 on confession and forty-two by letter (181), have been 
added to their membership. 

" With this special Divine blessing, renewed obligations and multiplied 
responsibilities come upon the churches. At least eighty converts 
begin the Christian life in churches without a pastor. Some will find 
homes elsewhere; most of them, however, should unite with our 
churches, but with what poor encouragement for religious culture and 
spiritual growth. Lambs without a shepherd! Some changes have 
occurred. Ridge church, 111., has been dismissed, by letter, to its 
own State Association. West Yigo church has consolidated with the 
Bethany church at Macksville. One church, at Hosmer, has been 
organized, making the present number of churches on our roll thirty- 
six, with an aggregate membership of 2,275, of which twenty-nine 
churches with a membership of 913 are more or less dependent. 



124 THE HOME MISSI0NAKY. July, 

" A review of the work and workings of the Home Missionary cause 
in our State confirms the conviction that Indiana should and might rank 
"with the other great States of the Interior in propagating churches and 
evangelizing the people upon the Congregational- Apostolic idea. When 
the flow of men and money to the great West shall begin to react, we 
may expect the shrubs planted here, if kept alive during this withering 
drouth, to take deeper root in our apparently barren soil, and grow to 
trees of beauty and fruitage. To let these tender plants die, whose 
fragrant flowers have sweetened the air in communities where they are 
located, is to let so much of Christ's kingdom go down. 

" In submitting this my last annual report, many reflections impress 
my mind deeply with reference to the work in Indiana, upon which so 
much thought has been bestowed, so much interest awakened and so 
much labor expended ; a few of which may deserve mention. 

"1. The crushing disparity between the magnitude of the work and 
the resources to accomplish it, by which the mind of the worker, when 
the burden is fully realized, is turned in other directions. Hence constant 
changes. 

" 2. Inadequate support does not long retain competent men. 

'•3. Limited aid will accomplish more when concentrated than when 
scattered ; by growing one church to a healthy self-support, rather than 
keeping five perpetual, half-starving dependencies. 

'• 4. Local missionaries with competent support in centers of popula- 
tion and where self-sustaining churches will soon develop ; and evangel- 
ists for field work, who would be known as pastors at large.' 1 

MICHIGAN. 
Rev. Lekhy Wabben, Lansing, Superintendent. 

The contributions to the Treasury from this State have been : From 
congregations and individuals, $17,002.40; from legacies, $.5,169.24; in 
all $22,171.64; a gain of $7,746.90 over last year. One hundred and 
twenty- two missionaries have been in commission, during the whole or a 
part of the year, supplying 197 congregations. Ten churches have been 
organized during the year. Of 290 churches in the State 134 are now 
on our list as home missionary churches, though not all of them are at 
present supplied with pastors. Eleven Home Missionaries have been 
ordained during the past year. Twenty-three churches have reported 
revivals of religion of more or less power. Ten churches have built 
houses of worship. The church in Athens has acquired title to its house 
of worship, by discharging the indebteduess upon it. The value of 
these eleven meeting-houses is $27,500. Five churches have assumed 
the entire support of their pastors ; five more, also, by yoking are able 
to do without aid. 

" Rev John Jones died at the close of three years of missionary serv- 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 125 

ice in connection with our church at West Branch. He was a good 
man, ami highly esteemed by the people among whom he labored. 

" A new feature in our work the past year has been the employment 
of a State Evangelist. Rev. C. F. Van Auken entered upon this work 
late in the autumu, and his labors appear to have brought a large bless- 
ing to every church he has been able to visit. We hope for larger and 
more blessed results of his work the coming year. This form of home 
missionary effort seems like]y to prove of the greatest value. 

"By the State census of 1881 the population of Michigan was 
1,853,658 ; and the annual increase from 1880 to 1884 was 54,180. At 
the same rate of increase the population in 1887 must be 2,01(5,198. In 
1884 we had a foreign-born population of 486,908, increasing at the rate 
of 24,615 per annum. Adding the increase for the last three years 
(73,845) our foreign born population in 1887 is 560,813. Michigan has a 
larger number of foreign-born than any other State of not more than 
equal population. Only four States in all, New York, Pennsylvania, 
Illinois and Massachusetts, have a larger foreign-born population than 
Michigan. If we count also the children of our 560,813 foreigners — 
reckoning according to the basis afforded by the United States census 
tables, that is, 121 children of foreign-born parents for every 100 foreigners 
— we have in Michigan a virtually foreign population of 1,256,221. The 
foreign population is especially predominant in the new counties of the 
North. In the entire upper peninsula, as well in some of the northern 
counties of the lower peninsula, the foreign-born constitute a clear 
majority. Our missionaries in Northern Michigan frequently preach to 
congregations in which there is scarcely a single native American. This 
fact of the large foreign population gives additional importance to our 
work in Northern Michigan. 

" Our upper peninsula, first occupied by Jesuit missionaries in 1641, 
has waited long for its development. The present year will be the most 
important ever known in its history. The bridging of St. Mary's River 
and the opening cf the Duluth, South Shore and Atlantic Railway will 
give that part of the State direct communication with the Atlantic sea- 
board. Several other important lines are also building. A thousand 
miles of new railway will be completed or begun the present year. 
Scores of new villages will spring up along the lines of these new rail- 
ways, which should have at once the church, the house of worship, and 
the Sunday-school. The gospel is the only power that can bring order 
and peace out of the Babel of nationalities. We have never had so 
grand an opportunity as now for home missionary work in Northern 
Michigan, and the opportunity will not wait. We must bend every 
energy to give this region Christian influences while society is forming. 
" The vastness of our home missionary field, larger hitherto and now 
than that presented by any other State or Territory, and the rapidity of 



126 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July 

our growth in recent years, involving an unusual number of dependent 
churches, make it impossible for Michigan this year to assume self- 
support. Bat our churches here are feeling more than ever before that 
the evangelization of the State belongs to ourselves first of all. Our 
resources are increasing. A larger number of men of means in our 
churches are appreciating the importance of the work and giving more 
liberally for it. Not many years hence the Michigan churches will cease 
to ask help from abroad and will rejoice to be helpers of the American 
Home Missionary Society in the work for all our land." 

MINNESOTA. 

Ret. John H. Moeley, Minneapolis, Superintendent. 

The receipts from Minnesota during the Society's fiscal year were 
$9,723.52. One hundred missionaries have been employed during the 
whole or a part of the year. They supplied 131 churches and 104 out- 
stations. Forty-four churches report revivals of religion, with over 450 
conversions. Two hundred and eighty have been added to the chuiches 
on confession, and 193 by letter. Six churches have reached self-sup- 
port. Nine houses of worship have been built, and thirteen repaired. 
One hundred and thirty-one Sunday-schools report a membership of 
over 7,900. 

The Superintendent in his report says : " The financial stringency of 
the Society has compelled retrenchment which has caused suffering 
but has not yet seriously impaired ths work. Some new openings have 
been neglected, some churches have gone pastorless. The pressure of 
the debt in stimulating our people to generous giving and our churches 
to self-support is welcome. But the debt as causing suffering among 
our poorly paid missionaries, some of whom cannot remain on. their 
fields unless enlargement comes, as well as in contracting our work 
which ought to advance with our growing population and wealth, is an 
unspeakable calamity. 

'"A series of home missionary conventions was held in the autumn 
for the purpose of giving information as to the needs of the work and 
stimulating our churches, both the independent and the aided, to more 
generous giving. Messrs. Maile of Nebraska, Wiard and Simmons of 
Dakota, and Albrecht of the German work assisted the Superintendent. 
The weather was adverse, winter setting in earlier than common. But 
the results were so satisfactory that the conventions were renewed in 
connection with the sessions of the district conferences in the spring. 
We expect during the Association year to raise at least $10,000 for 
Home Missions. Partly from the pressure of the debt, but partly from 
their own generosity, we can rej^ort six churches as assuming self-sup- 
port : Mankato, which also increased the salary of its pastor $200 and 
is planning for a parsonage; Union, Minneapolis, which built a fine par- 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 127 

sonage; Como Ave., Minneapolis, which erected a church costing with 
lots $13,000; Atlantic, St. Paul, which raised money to pay a debt and 
finish their new church building ; Wabasha and Glencoe, both of which 
gave at great sacrifice. Other churches will be added to this roll of 
honor soon. 

"Our State Evangelist resigned in November. Partly because of 
financial considerations and partly because we could not find the right 
man, his place has not been filled. Mr. Henry Plant has done invalu- 
able service in many eh arches, this winter, in revival meetings. Some 
of our pastors have done evangelistic work in neighboring churches, 
and the reports of conversions and revivals are encouraging. 

"We have engaged in no new work for the past year. Th. s is signi- 
ficant in a growing State like Minnesota. If it long remains true it will 
be disastrous. In St. Paul there are several new openings ; in Minnea- 
polis there is at least one ; in Duluth there is one ; in Winona there are 
two missions formed which have not yet asked for help but must have 
it when the call comes ; in various parts of the State there are similar 
opportunities. With the record of progress which our new missions in 
the cities have made, it seems suicidal to abandon the aggressive policy. 

" We can report eight new churches, all of them organized in connec- 
tion with established work, so that they are not to be classed as new 
work distinctively; six new meeting-houses, with three more commenced 
and two new parsonages. 

" Our work is hopeful. If the Society can aid us a little longer and 
as generously as in the past, we can soon show a group of churches in 
Minnesota, strong, apostolic, and ready to do their part for ' the regions 
beyond.' " 

KANSAS. 
Rev. Addison Blanchard, Topeka, Superintendent. 

The contributions from this State have been $4,029.08. Missionaries 
employed during the year, 101. They have supplied 143 churches and 
seventy-five out-stations. Number of churches organized, twenty-four. 
Number of Sunday-schools for the same time, twenty- eight. Sixty-eight 
churches rej>ort having held special evangelistic services, and some 
ninety have held more than the usual Sabbath services, with some 
unusual interest. In fifteen of these the work of grace has been 
noteworthy for extent and power. Four churches have become 
self-supporting. Fifteen houses of worship have been built and 
twelve repaired. Seven parsonages have been provided. 

The Superintendent writes : " The year has thus been one of great 
blessing on our work. The revival interest of last year has continued 
in a good degree. We have not had the assistance of noted evangelists, 
but neighboring pastors have assisted each other with great blessing. 
The calls for help in special work have been many and very urgent and 



128 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

the help of several wise and efficient Evangelists could Lave been used 
to very great advantage. We believe that the employment of such men 
would be a wise economy even in a financial point of view, and that 
times of debt and depression are times when such work on the mission 
field is especially necessary and peculiarly likely to be fruitful in many 
ways. We have been specially gratified that our missionary churches 
and our pastors over the State have so promptly responded to the ap- 
peal for special collections to aid in canceling the indebtedness of the 
Society. The response was general and many took special pains to can- 
vass the field, going from house to house. Some churches raised the 
whole amount due that quarter from the Society. Others were ready 
to assume self-support when the need was apparent and the great work 
of the Society was understood. 

" The immigration to the State has been as great as was anticipated 
at the time of our last annual report. It bids fair to continue and to 
increase during the coming year. If members of our churches in other 
parts of the land who purpose coming to Kansas would correspond 
wfith us, we might direct them to places where they w r ould not only find 
churches already founded, but where they could be at once of great serv- 
ice. 

"The 1,200 miles of railroad spoken of last year as planned for be- 
came 1,500 miles, and the coming year bids fair to greatly exceed that. 
The roads now building are not only branches of original lines but new 
trans-continental lines that are for the first time seeking to traverse the 
State. All this means unusual activity of every kind, and it means that 
our work cannot be postponed to future years. Home Missions in Kansas 
must be pushed now. The intelligence of the people, the absence of 
the saloon, the vast number of young men and women, the general read- 
iness to attend church and to listen to the gospel when presented with 
plainness and by devoted men, make our State one that should be at- 
tractive to those who are sincerely devoted to the one work of winning 
souls. We want no men who come or seek to come simply to find land 
or to join the general 'boom.'" 

NEBRASKA. 

Rev. John L. Maile, Omaha, Superintendent. 

The contributions to the Treasury from this State have been, from 
churches and individuals, $3,102.41. One hundred and twelve mission- 
aries have been employed during the whole or a part of the year, sup- 
plying 147 churches and 87 out-stations. Sixty-eight years of service 
have been performed on missionary fields reporting a church-member- 
ship of over 4,156. Forty-four churches report over 510 conversions. 
Sixteen churches have been organized, 21 houses of worship erected 
and six repaired. The additions to the churches have been 461 on con- 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 129 

fVssion, and 236 by letter. Sixteen Sunday-schools have been organized 
and 13-1 schools report ;i membership of 7,712. Fifteen churches have 
become self-suppo] ting. 

The Superintendent in his report says : 

"Two evangelists have been employed during a part of the year, 
and it is the unanimous sentiment of pastors and churches that this 
form of ministerial labor should be systematically provided for and 
constantly maintained. Additions to the churches by profession have 
he u larger than ever before. The revival spirit is rapidly increasing, 
and with efficient evangelistic work the coming year will mark an im- 
portanl epoch in the spiritual history of our churches. The home 
missionary emergency has an important effect upon the spiritual as well 
as the financial interests of our churches. 

'• The straitness of financial resources has caused the holding of an 
extended series of sixteen home missionary conventions ' for the presen- 
tation of the issue now upon us, followed by discussions, exhortations, 
and, as far as possible, a baptism of the Holy Ghost, that each person 
present and participating may return to his church quickened for new 
endeavors in his work, and that this emergency, which seems a disaster 
to us, may be turned by our communing and faith into a mighty- 
blessing.' Some seventy-five churches have been represented in these 
conventions, and upon some of the meetings great spiritual blessing- 
has descended. 

"The outward and immediate results may be summarized as fol- 
lows : Cash contributions, $1,492; churches quickened to self-support, 
four ; churches encouraged to ask for less aid, eight ; churches quick- 
ened in faith, courage and trust in God about 150. 

" The coming season is to witness unprecedented activity in rail- 
road extension and expansion of cities. Many new towns are forming. 
Urgent calls for new work come unsolicited. Opportunities which 
signify great blessing or most humiliating defeat are before us, bless- 
ing if we can utilize them, defeat if we are compelled to halt for want 
of means. May God anoint individuals and churches throughout our 
Zion with a great enlargement of faith and liberality." 

NORTH NEBRASKA, BLACK HILLS (DAKOTA TER.) AND NORTHEAST 

WYOMING. 
Rev. Harmon Beoss, Chadron, Neb., General Missionary. 

" As the results of the work in Northern Nebraska will be included in 
the report of Superintendent Maile," Mr. Bross writes, "there is no need 
for me to dwell upon that in detail. The work has been, as heretofore, 
helping to gather, organize, encourage, assist in securing pastors, erect- 
ing houses of worship, supplying churches when vacant, and assisting in 
special meetings. Our work in Northern Nebraska has been crippled by 



130 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

the embarrassments of the Society. In some cases where students dur- 
ing the summer had made a good beginning, it seemed doubtful about 
pledging to ministers such support from the Society as was really needed 
in order to secure such men as were demanded by these field?. In 
some cases, where the condition of the treasury was well known, men 
feared to enter new work lest they should fail of support. We have 
lost ground from this cause along the Burlington and Missouri extension, 
from the Grand Island northwest. Along this line are seveial bright, 
promising towns, notably the city of Broken Bow, which will no doubt 
number 5,000 people within three or four years. At these points others 
have gone in and organized to hold the ground, but are doing very lit- 
tle work. We have but a single church on the whole Grand Island ex- 
tension, that at Ravenna. This is a promising field. Along the 200 
miles of this extension, to be pushed this summer, we ought to have at 
least eight or ten churches." 

THE BLACK HILLS AND EAST WYOMING DISTRICT. 

" There are now nine churches in this district, four having been 
organized during the past year : at Lusk, Wyo., and at Buffalo Gap, Her- 
mosa, and Lower Battle River, in Dakota. Including the minister to 
the one self-supporting church,that at Dead wood, there have been, besides 
the general missionary, twelve missionaries at work during the whole or a 
part of the year. Rev. W. H. Atkinson closed his five years' pastorate at 
Rapid City, the last of July, and Rev. E. H. Martin laid down his work 
at Deadwood, August 1st. The church at Rapid secured Rev. J. N. 
Lewis to begin work September 1st. The Deadwood church, after waiting 
some months, were made happy in welcoming Rev. W. H. Buss from 
West Burlington, Iowa. Mr. Hulett's six months at Spearfish expired 
on the last of June, and Rev. H. S. Goodwin has nearly completed his 
six months of work there. Rev. W. D. J. Stevenson left Custer at the 
expiration of his year of service, last November, and they have been 
without supply since, except that for a time now Mr. France has driven 
upon alternate Sabbaths from Buffalo Gap, and I have also spent a Sab- 
bath or two. 

" The church people at Custer have kept at work, have been improv- 
ing their church property, putting in pews, lamps, etc., maintaining so- 
cial gatherings, Sunday-schools, prayer-nieetings, meetings of little 
' Busy Bees,' etc. I have written to them from time to time, when I 
could not visit them, and tried to keep them in good heart. The church 
is probably in better spirit to go forward under the lead of a good pas- 
tor than ever before. Mr. Fiance, at Buffalo Gap, has been doing faith- 
ful and successful work, and their church building will soon be com- 
pleted. The churches lately organized at Hermosa and Lower Battle 
River form a very promising field, and Mr. Shaver, a licentiate of the 
Black Hills Association, is much beloved. They are to live at Her- 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 131 

mosa. With the extension of the road farther toward Deadwood this 
summer, two new points at least will be open for occupancy. 

" In East Wyoming the railroad brought us two new important 
towns, Lusk and Douglas. At Lusk we have a church organized and 
shall soon take steps to build. The only preaching had since last Sep- 
tember, when Mr. Goodwin left, I have supplied. There is no other 
church work at Lusk. A Sabbath-school and prayer-meeting are main- 
tained. An efficient Ladies' Aid Society has money in the bank, toward 
a church-building fund. The condition of our work in the Black Hills 
region furnishes occasion for rejoicing and thanksgiving. The two 
strong growing churches at Deadwood and Rapid mean to interest them- 
selves in neighboring churches, and I lcok for substantial progress all 
along the line during the year to come. You will agree that the admin- 
istration of affairs in the district has been economical, but I hope that 
next year we may have more funds with which to work. Personally, it 
has been a year of very hard work, especially the trips into the Hills, 
but now that the severity of winter is over, the work can be prose- 
cuted with less of peril and discomfort." 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 
Rev. Hieam D. Wiakd, Mitchell, Superintendent. 

Tha churches of this district contributed $1,176.86 to the treasury 
of the Society. Eighty-seven missionaries have been, during the whole 
or a part of the year, in connection with 101 churches and 85 stations. 
Thirty churches report over 390 conversions. Two hundred and twen- 
ty-two have been added to the churches on confession, and 193 by 
letter. Twenty-one churches and twenty-six Sunday-schools have been 
organized. Fourteen houses of worship have been erected, and seven 
repaired. Eighty-two Sunday-schools report a membership of over 
6,100. 

"Our churches," says Mr. Wiard, "have looked hard times, misfor- 
tunes, and calamities in the face, and moved steadily forward. Our 
German missionaries are doing grand work. Six of them occupy twen- 
ty-two organized churches, and seven out-stations. None of our 
churches have come to self-support during the year, but Milbank 
promises to go alone when the right man is found for pastor. I hope 
Ipswich and Watertown will soon follow. 

" The churches of South Diikota, I believe, are anxious to do all 
they can for others, and our Ladies' Home Missionary Unions are do- 
ing much to educate the churches aright. Gracious revivals have been 
enjoyed by a number of the churches. Ipswich and Webster have been 
specially helped. The severe storms and snow blockades have pre- 
vented many of ths churches from contemplated special services. 

"I have had but little troable in getting men for my field; only 



132 THE HOME MISSIONAEY. July 

four or five of our churches have been vacant for any considerable time. 
But I could use twenty good men this spring. Several hundred miles 
of railroad are to be built this summer. This will open more than one 
hundred new towns, centers of influence, to be occupied for Christ. 
We must do our part. 

" The heavy snows of the past winter promise us a bountiful har- 
vest, and if we get it we shall need less help. We shall need an in- 
creased supply of both men and money to do our part in taking this 
field for our Lord Jesus Christ ; and to the young men of our semina- 
ries we can offer the best of privileges of growth and work." 



NORTH DAKOTA AND EASTERN MONTANA. 

Rev. IIexhy C. Simmons, Fargo, North Dakota, Superintendent. 

The contributions from this District to the treasury of the Society 
have been $461.49. Thirty-nine missionaries have supplied, during the 
whole or a part of the year, fifty churches and fourteen out-stations. 
Eight churches and seven Sunday-schools have been organized. Fifty- 
one schools report an attendance of over 2,100 children. Five houses 
of worship have been built, and four repaired. 

" Eight new churches were organized within the year. Of these, 
Amenia proposes from the first to be self- suppoi'ting, and should be 
placed on the roll of honor for not getting upon the roll of aided 
churches. At the time of organization $2,500 had been raised for the 
building of a church edifice, which is now inclosed and will soon be 
completed. There has been a marked growth here in five years. We 
have now a membership of over 1,000, where five years ago we had only 
about fifty. Then we had four churches, now forty-one ; then we had 
two church buildings, now twenty-two ; then no parsonages, now six ; 
then six ministers, now twenty-one in pxtive work. 

" Twelve theological students labored during the summer, and did 
excellent work. The policy of employing students for other than new fields 
for the first summer is doubtful. The churches, unless permanently sup- 
plied, soon lose the ground gained by the summer's work. There have 
been encouraging revivals on several of the fields. What is needed for 
still larger results is, a man qualified for such work to spend his time in 
conducting special meetings among the pastorless churches, and assist- 
ing pastors as occasion may arise. The increase in spiritual life and 
additions to the churches coming from such work will largely increase 
the resoiarces of the churches ior Christian work. 

" During the past few weeks strenuous efforts have been made to 
secure some of the strong men of the graduating classes. Your Super- 
intendent visited the various seminaries, laid the needs of special fields, 
some of them attractive in every way — good support, good opportunity 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 133 

for growth, entirely without preaching in some cases. Letters from the 
fields have been written, begging these strong young men to come; 
but as jei with small success. I see no way but to raise up a ministry 
in schools, with shorter courses and less physical comforts, nearer 
home, to supply home missionary fields, and let the established semi- 
naries train men for the foreign fields and comfortable churches in their 
vicinity. In five years I have been able to secure but two graduates to 
come directly from the seminaries to attractive fields in North Dakota. 
Students are willing- to come for good pay for a summer, as a sort of 
holiday; but this grand home missionary work of laying foundations 
for a mighty Christian commonwealth must go begging for men and 
money to enter fields not only ripe for a bountiful harvest, but some of 
them begging and beseeching for men. Are there no Pauls and Silases 
in the ministry of to-day to hear this greater than Macedonian cry?" 

COLORADO AND EAST WYOMING. 

Rev. ('. M. Sandbes, Denver, Col., Superintendent. 

The receipts from this District were $720.63. Thirty-one missiona- 
ries have been under commission during the whole or a part of the year, 
in connection with thirty-one churches and ten out-stations. Seven 
churches report over seventy-five conversions. Twenty-nine Sunday- 
schools report a membership of over 2,810. Three churches and five 
Sunday-schools have been organized, two houses of worship built and 
two repaired. Mr. Sanders reports " a fair degree of prosperity all along 
the line. The outlook is hopeful. New railroads are coming in, and the 
old lines are pushing on so that all this vast region can soon be easily 
reached. The tide of immigration is setting this way, and the hills and 
valleys of this Rocky Mountain section will soon be filled with inhabit- 
ants. The class of people coming this way are of that sort who take 
kindly to the Congregational way, and they ought to have Congrega- 
tional services. It is just the polity to unite the diversified elements. 
I so much wish that we could have a general missionary. I am too 
small for so great and broad a field." 

UTAH, IDAHO, WEST MONTANA. AND WEST WYOMING. 

Rev. Dei.avax L. Leonard, Salt Lake City, Utah, Superintendent. 

The receipts from this District, within the year, were §164 35. Six- 
teen missionaries have been under commission during the whole or a 
part of the year, supplying thirty churches and stations. Six churches 
report over 110 conversions. In all, twenty-two have been added to the 
churches on confession, and fourteen by letter. Twenty- two Sunday- 
schools report a membership of over 1,180. Superintendent Leonard 
resigned near the close of the year. His successor will be appointed 



134 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

soon. In the mean time the Executive Committee will seek the advice of 
the Utah Home Missionary Committee in the prosecution of the work. 

CALIFORNIA AND NEVADA. 
Rev. James II. Wakren, D.D., San Francisco, Superintendent. 

The receipts from this district have been $4,236.07. Seventy-seven 
missionaries, including five theological students and four Sunday-school 
laborers, have been in commission, making an increase of ten over last 
year's forces. Thirty-two of this number have served a round twelve 
months ; the rest have ranged from two months to ten, making in all an 
equivalent of fifty-one years of labor performed. These have had the 
care of eighty-two churches and at least sixty-two out- stations. Includ- 
ing the Swedish Church in San Francisco, sedulously aided and nurtured 
by the Society's representatives, up to the time of its formation, nine 
churches have been organized, adding nearly 300 members to the roll. 
The Superintendent says : " We confidently report five churches more 
that will from this time on be on the list of self-support. It is some- 
thing to look at forty self-sustaining churches out of 119, with a growing 
promise of more soon to be placed on the roll of honor. 

" The churches in Sunol, Fresno, Modesto, Tulare, Alturas 
Gait, Vernon, San Diego and Clayton have been richly and some power- 
fully blessed with revivals. The attitude of our churches has been one 
of deep feeling and desire for the aggressive work of the Holy Spirit 
Earnest prayer and the faith that went with it, have not been in vain. 
The signs indicate that this ingathering of souls has only begun and we 
are on the eve of a great refreshing from the presence of the Lord. 

" Seven houses of worship have been dedicated which were built at a 
cost of about $15,000. Work is begun on three or four others. When 
these are completed ninety-six out of 119 churches will be comfortably 
and substantially housed. One hundred and one Sunday-schools have 
been sustained by our missionaries with a membership — including teach- 
ers, officers, children, and Bible-class scholars — of some 7,137, an increase 
over last year of nearly 1,000. Ninety-nine of our churches, or over 
eighty-two per c.ent., have contributed to the Treasury of the Society. All 
but four of our forty-one self-supporting churches are included in the 
ninety-nine. 

" For the first time in the history of its work has the Society been 
remembered in the wills of those who have died. One legacy of some 
$3,000, available a few months hence, was left as a token of grateful ap- 
preciation of the Society's work in San Bernardino County at a time 
when Congregationalism had next to no friends in all that region, and 
met with suspicious questionings and rebuffs for many years. The tes- 
tator lived to see the church he loved and the polity he believed in es- 
tablished on strong foundations and its bow of promise lifted up in the 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONAKY. 135 

sight of all men. A new and important auxiliary has been added to our 
missionary work, that of a State Evangelist. 

"The State is receiving an increase to its one million of inhabitants 
at a rate suggested by the word ' boom.' 1 This word is no longer 
slang ; for about three years it has been classic, and bids fair to be so 
for a decade. Some of our far-seeing economists have been predicting 
and looking for a collapse, but the boom keeps on, persistent, big, giv- 
ing no notice of reaction. 

"Southern California is alive with colonies and new towns. Real 
estate men are pulverizing the old Spanish grants into ten acre farms 
and corner lots. As last as they are put into the market buyers ■ re 
found. Who are these buyers, that can be counted by scores of htm- 
dreds and thousands? They belong to a class that make a State. 
They come from our own New England, from our imperial Middle 
States, from the enterprising, intense West. They have a knack in 
building great cities, like Chicago, Kansas City, St. Louis. They are 
putting sections of the nineteenth century into San Diego, Los 
Angeles, Pasadena ; in fact, into all Southern California. Making allow- 
ance for the many that have come only as tourists or mild-winter ex- 
cursionists, we can safely estimate that a large majority have come to 
stay. On the first Sunday in January over two hundred of these new- 
comers united with different churches in Los Angeles alone, by letters 
from eastern churches. Those who intend to stay only six weeks or six 
months do not bring that sort of paper with them. 

" Last January, soon after word had been received to take up no 
more new work for the present, no matter how promising or important, 
calls were made directly and indirectly from eighteen places in the 
counties of San Diego, San Bernardino, and Los Angeles for Congre- 
gational help. So impressed was the Committee of our California 
Home Missionary Society with the urgency of the case and the im- 
minence of probable results, that it passed a vote asking the Executive 
Committee in New York to withdraw the restriction laid on new work, 
so far as it applied to Southern California/' 

OREGON AND EAST WASHINGTON. 
Rev. George IT. Atkixsox, D.D., Portland, Oregon, Superintendent. 

The receipts from this district, within the year, were §1,086 paid 
into the Treasury of this Society. Twenty-nine missionaries have been 
employed during the whole or a part of the year. Twelve of these 
labored in Oregon in connection with twenty-four churches and 
stations. In East Washington seventeen missionaries have been in 
•ommission and served thirty-two churches and stations. 

Dr. Atkinson says : 

u Two churches in Oregon and one in East Washington plan for 



136 tre home missionary. July, 

self-support next year. Others will strive for it. Pastors have gen- 
erally had vigorous health and have been faithful in every part of their 
work. The people have had a fair degree of business prosperity. The 
flow of immigration has continued during the year, swelling to larger 
proportions during the spring, summer and early autumn, adding, as 
estimated, 30,000 to the population of both States. Revivals have been 
reported in about one-third of the churches, manifest in the increase 
of Christian efforts, the ingathering of members, and their union and . 
fellowship. Success has attended the building and completion, free of 
debt, of three houses of worship — Pendleton and Lexington in Oregon, 
and Pullman in Washington Territory — and two parsonages, one at 
Oregon City, free of debt, and one at Atahnum ; also the improvement 
of six other churches free of debt. Pour or five new church buildings 
are planned, and some preparations are made to erect them, at Nachess, 
Winass, Pasco, and Lyle, in Washington Territory, and Hood River in 
Oregon ; also a parsonage for Plymouth Church, North Portland. 
They are begun with good courage and liberal subscriptions. Their 
completion will depend on the grants of the Congregational Union, 
whose aid has been so helpful and generous in the past. The Sunday- 
school work has been blessed in Eastern Washington. Ten new 
churches have been organized within the year. Three or four Societies 
of Christian Endeavor have been formed and enlisted in important 
work. Our academies and colleges gro-w slowly in number and Chris- 
tian influence. 

" We have our hindrances. More than twenty five per cent, of our 
home missionary churches have been without pastors during a part or 
all of the year. This has imposed unusual labor and care in preaching 
and pastoral work upon the Superintendent and General Missionary 
and upon voluntary helpers. Lack of funds has prevented much new 
work. The halt called on account of the debt has cut down grants, 
and reduced applications. Some pastorless churches have been neg- 
lected for the sake of others in greater need. With success in supply- 
ing eight or nine, the rest are not sure. Such losses of time and service 
deplete and depress these small churches, and imperil not only the 
outlay already made for them, but their life as well. Out of such trials, 
in time past, other churches have risen, revived, grown, and become 
self-supporting and vigorous helpers of the weak. We may hope that 
God has provided a way of escape and of abundant blessings for some 
of these sorely stricken churches. 

" This region draws larger increments of population every quarter. 
The new people come to stay, while older settlers remain more con- 
tented. Mining, agriculture, stock raising, wool-growing, fruit-raising, 
lumbering and fishing take on larger proportions. Railroads are con- 
solidating their lines and extending branches. Commercial business on 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 137 

sea and land grows rapidly, and builds up thriving cities, inland as wed 
as seaward. Restrictive legislation and vetoes, State and national, do 
not long repress the spirit or break the courage of the people. The 
threats and plots of socialists, strikers, and anti-Chinese rioters of last 
year have lost force, or been silenced by the sober good sense of the 
really industrious classes. Christians are uniting more than ever to 
promote revivals, to withstand intemperance, to secure Sabbath ob- 
servance, and to reach all classes in city and country with the gospel 
of Christ. The larger denominations push their Sunday-school and 
church plans with unusual vigor and liberal outlays of labor and of 
money. The calls are urgent for us to do likewise. Public senti- 
ment has been slowly changing from opposition and neglect, to respect 
and interest in morality and religion. Few, if any, towns or settle- 
ments oppose or fail to help erect houses of worship and support faith- 
ful preachers of the gospel. The reckless elements of society are sift- 
ing out, while the worthier and more useful ones command recognition 
and respect. No time has been more favorable than the present to 
garner the fruits of home missionary seed-sowing, and to establish our 
communities in the principles of wisdom and knowledge on which may 
rest the security of the State and the welfare of the church." 

WEST WASHINGTON. 
Rev. Clajbk C. Otis, Seattle, Superintendent. 

The receipts from this missionary district, within the year, were 
$352.30 paid into the treasury of the Society. 

Twenty- three missionaries have been under commission during the 
whole or pait of the year, and labored in connection with sixty-four 
churches and stations. 

The Superintendent says : 

" Of the five churches which give promise of coming to self-support 
within ten years, two have been organized during the past year, the 
White River church, Rev. O. L. Fowler pastor, and the Whidby Island 
church, Rev. Geo. Lindsay pastor. Two houses of worship have been 
built, one in White River Valley and one in Seattle, a mission chapel con 
nected with Plymouth church. The chapel in East Tacoma has also 
been freed from debt. At Houghton and Tacoma there have been revivals 
of religion and the churches are strengthened thereby. 

" The most encouraging work of the past year, however, has been the 
founding of Puget Sound Academy, on W 7 hidby Island. W r hile not 
directly under the fostering care of the Home Missionary Society, it 
could not have been founded had it not been for the sympathy and help 
which came from this source, and it is therefore truly a child of Home 
Missions. Founded as it is on a good financial basis, it is sure to prove 
one of the most potent factors in saving this region for Christ. 



138 THE HOME MISSIONARY. J«lj 

" As to the future, Western Washington never -will become an agri- 
cultural region. Its population will always be gathered about milling, 
mining, manufacturing, and commercial centers. No doubt there will 
be two or three large cities on the Sound, but the development of the 
country as a whole will be very slow. The larger places will furnish 
fields for strong churches, but the milling and mining towns will always 
be dependent upon the Home Missionary Society. Our climate is pleas- 
ant and will always attract people.. Our coal and iron and timber are 
almost inexhaustible, and are sources of wealth which are sure to be de- 
veloped. Railroads are coming. The prospects for this region have 
never been brighter than now." 

WORK AMONG IMMIGRANT POPULATION— SLAVONIC DEPARTMENT. 
Rev. Henry A. Schauffler, Cleveland, Ohio, Superintendent. 

In summing up the year's results of the Bohemian work, Mr. 
Schauffler says: 

" We find in Cleveland encouraging growth ; an increase of mission- 
ary forces, larger average attendance at the services, an increased attend- 
ance at Bethlehem and Cyril Sunday-schools, and generally a stronger 
hold of the work upon the community. On the west side (Cyril) we see a 
great quickening of interest among the Catholic Bohemians estranged 
from their own church, who hail with joy the new chapel now being built. 
A new (third) station in East Cleveland, which we were strongly urged to 
open when we hardly knew how to do it, is a cheering proof of the ac- 
cessibility of the Bohemian population, and of the willingness of our Con- 
gregational churches to meet the demands of the work. The success of 
the Bible-readers' school has been placed beyond a doubt, and the very 
efficient labors of Miss Hobai t and her Bible readers have proved inval- 
uable. This is an agency which will abundantly repay all expense in- 
curred in putting it upon a solid foundation; it needs a 'home' of its 
own. Notwithstanding Mr. Price's departure and other drawbacks, 
Cleveland affords much reason for encouragement. 

" In Chicago we find a better chapel ; fifty per cent, more children 
reached and more regularity of attendance ; a new Boys' Union, which 
draws them from the streets and s-aloons by the offer of rational enter- 
tainment and instruction ; a new girls' prayer- meeting; a new kindergar- 
ten ; the sewing-school flourishing ; two new openings for services; a 
new Bohemian Christian newspaper established with 1,105 subscribers 
thus far, the only one of the kind in America, and already exerting a most 
desirable influence in reaching both the unchurched masses in the cities 
and the Bohemian Protestants scattered through the land, carrying to 
all these the gospel, binding together the believing and serious elements, 
and giving our mission work through the country an influence which 
nothing else could do. For the first time Mr. Adams reports eight or 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 139 

nine converted Bohemians, aside from the workers employed by the 
mission. The work has a bright outlook, if it can be supplied with the 
needful chapel and other instrumentalities. 

" In St. Paul a beginning was made last July of a new Bohemian mis- 
sion. A house was rented in the Bohemian district for a chapel, in which 
a Sunday-school was commenced and Bohemian services held for a num- 
ber of weeks, last summer, by two Oberlin Bohemian students. A new 
chapel and an Oberlin Bohemian evangelist graduate to be stationed 
there give great promise of permanence and success. 

"In Iowa City a nominally union Sunday-school in the Bohemian dis- 
trict passed over to the Congregational church; Bohemian services and 
house visitation conducted for several weeks last summer by an Oberlin 
student, with the prospect of the erection of a chapel and the permanent 
stationing there of an Oberlin Bohemian evangelist graduate, and the 
probable adoption of the work by the Iowa Home Missionary Society, 
justify the expectation of permanence and success in the work at this 
point. 

"In Omaha the splendid faith and courage of the Saint Mary's 
Avenue Congregational church, which has spared neither gifts nor 
personal service in establishing a Bohemian mission, purchasing and 
fitting up a chapel, conducting a Sunday-school, a sewing-school and 
a Boys 1 Club, although aided only for a few weeks last summer by a 
Bohemian missionary (an Oberlin student) has met with signal reward. 
Rev. M. J. P. Thing, pastor at Linwood, Neb., has accepted the call to 
settle at Omaha, learn the Bohemian language, and devote himself to 
missionary work for Bohemians. 

"In West Springfield, Mass., a new work was commenced last 
summer by Miss Bertha Juengling from the Cleveland Bethlehem 
Sunday-school, who is studying in Mr. Moody's school at Northfield in 
preparation for missionary work, and who labored v\ ith much zeal and 
success during part of her summer vacation, and again for a few days 
last winter, especially amongst the children of that Bohemian colony. 

"The Oberlin Slavic Missionary Training Department made it 
possible for us last summer, for the first time, to reach a number of the 
Bohemian colonies in the West and Northwest, as well as some Polish 
settlements. Five of the students have labored in Buffalo, Berea, O., 
Toledo, Detroit, Muscoda, Wis., St. Paul, New Prague, Minn., Iowa 
City and surrounding points, Omaha, Maple Creek, Linwood, Pilsen. 
and Crete, Nebraska, and one point in Kansas. Thus a commencement 
of work has been made at a number of points, and at others encourage- 
ment given to hold on till we can reach them. 

" Turning to the Polish work, we find its third year, in Detroit, has 
been its best, and that there has never been so much encouragement to 
press forward. The admirable courage and zeal of the Detroit Con- 



140 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

gregational churches, which commenced this most difficult work without 
any prospect of Polish laborers, has been wonderfully rewarded by the 
Lord, who sent them, last summer, Mr. Lewis, the only Polish student 
at Oberiin, who from June to September labored with great success, 
and also furnished them a Polish female missionary who has won the 
affection and confidence of all, and is proving a most efficient laborer. 

" In Cleveland Polish work was virtually commenced during this 
last year by Mr. Lewis and Mr. Staneff (the Oberlin Bulgarian student). 
As their chief labors have been elsewhere, only a beginning of this work 
could be made here, but enough has been accomplished to show the 
great need and the practicability of such work. Last summer Mr. 
Staneff explored the Polish field in Buffalo. 

" In Toledo a new work among the Poles commenced last December, 
notwithstanding great fears of violence, has met with unexpected favor 
from that people, and shows the wisdom of entering the most unpromis- 
ing fields, and the entire practicability of reaching the most degraded, 
bigoted and violent elements of our foreign population. 

"A bird's-eye view of the whole Slavic Mission field shows ten 
stations, where last year we reported only four. This year the whole 
missionary force, including students and Bible-readers, is fifteen 
against thirteen of last year. A Bohemian Christian newspaper is a 
new and powerful auxiliary. All along the lines we note genuine prog- 
ress, of which the most cheering is the success won in gathering and 
training an efficient body of laborers, where four years ago none could 
be found. With such results already achieved, and such large promise 
of future success, there is every reason why the Congregational 
churches of the land should give to this work their heartiest sympathy, 
their most earnest prayers, and their most efficient aid."' 

GERMAN DEPARTMENT. 
Rev. George E. Albrecht, Omaha, Neb., Superintendent. 

" Looking over the past year," Mr. Albrecht reports, " we can grate- 
fully say, it has been a fruitful one. We have organized fourteen new 
churches, with an aggregate of 224 members, giving us a total of 57 
German Congregational churches, with 1,871 members. Aside from 
these newly organized churches, we have added 278 members, by pro- 
fession or by letter, to our various church rolls, and have contributed 
for the various benevolent enterprises of our denomination the sum of 
$1,898.68, or an average of $1.01 per member. 

"New church buildings were erected in Scotland, Dak., Omaha, 
Neb., and Huron, Dak. — fields of importance and of promise. In con- 
nection with the Omaha church, it would be ungrateful not to mention 
the kindness and generosity of Mrs. Reuben Gaylord, the widow of the 
first home missionary superintendent for Nebraska, who gave us a 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 141 

choice lot at a nominal price, thus enabling us, with the help oi' the 
Congregational Union, to erect a tasteful building in a most favorable 
location. 

"Our working force lias been increased by five brethren, who have 
entered upon their work with energy and devotion. 

"Looking at the work in the various States, and turning, of course, 
first to the East, we note the appointment of a General German mission- 
ary in Connecticut, an earnest of greater and better things to come. 
Would that other States might follow this good example! 

"Here in Illinois the church in Waukegan is our pride. Only two 
years old, with a neat and attractive sanctuary, self-supporting from the 
beginning, they have added seventy-six to their membership, and have 
taken an active interest in all the work of our denomination. In Chi- 
cago there remains much to be done, and it is extremely difficult to find 
the right men for this important work while the means at onr command 
are so scanty. The Sedgwick Street Mission, for about four years 
under the faithful care of Pastor Halbersleben, will soon develop into a 
church. A new work has been begun by one of our students at Half- 
day, on the Wisconsin Central Railway, among a numerous German 
population, who are cut off from religious privileges. 

"Iowa has continued in her faithful, patient work, gaining especially 
in Muscatine and Dubuque, both of which churches are moving earnestly 
toward the erection of a new building, much needed in each case, and 
sure to come in due time. Any man who sees the ' little church on the 
shelf in Dubuque, and learns the story of its faithful, self-sacrificing 
work, must have a heart of stone if he is not moved not merely to wish 
for them a new building, but at once to open his pocket-book, and to 
' take stock ' in such a noble enterprise. 

"Evangelist Klossner has labored since New Year's in connection 
with the German churches in this State, under appointment from the 
State Society, reviving and quickening many hearts, although not se- 
curing the desired number of conversions. Another season, we trust, 
we may have the ' showers of blessing ' we have been praying for. 

"Missouri has German churches in La Grange, holding fast what it 
has — Springfield and St. Louis. The latter church has changed pastors, 
and in its attractive edifice gathers especially good evening congrega- 
tions. A bright future lies before this church under its new leader. 
Springfield has been stirred by the spirited preaching of the evangelist, 
Major Cole. Our German church has shared in the blessing, and while 
hearts were aglow has taken the first decided step in the long con- 
sidered plan of erecting a house of worship. A lot has been secured, 
and if the A. C. U. is able to do a liberal thing in an important center, 
where ours is at present the only German church, the work will soon be 
upon a secure basis, and will increase in power faster than hitherto. 



142 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July 

" In Nebraska the work of General Missionary Suess first attracts 
our attention. Whoever comes into his family cannot help wishing that 
all his girls were boys, and they were all going to be like him; a supply 
of good ministers for out- German work would be so assured. He has or- 
ganized four new churches, the result of his own indefatigable labors, 
with several others in prospect. Three new men are needed impera- 
tively for this work, if this section of the country is to be supplied with 
the gospel, and if we are to follow out to its legitimate fruitage the 
work begun. 

"Dakota leads in the number of churches, having now nineteen — six 
of which were organized during the last year. Mr. Jose has cared with 
untirin" - energy for his large and extended parish, but feels now the 
need of a milder climate. May God grant to these churches a worthy 
successor ! The new church building in Scotland is a tower of strength 
for the whole work in South Dakota. New railroad extensions, forming 
new towns and centers, will by and by necessitate a reorganization of 
some of the churches, but even if thus their numbers may decrease, the 
work will gain in strength. Mitchell, with its various out-stations, 
proves the value and the power of a pastor's earnest prayers ; for these 
were the chief and almost only weapons with which Mr. Wuerrschmidt 
began work there. United and eager for the Master's work, the plan 
of erecting a church building is prayerfully discussed, and the good 
women, always first in such work, have begun to lay aside their savings 
for this purpose. Huron, a new church with a building purchased of 
our Episcopalian brethren, endeavors to deepen the spirituality of the 
German people there. Tulare aad Medfield, new organizations under 
Pastor Geick's care, have suffered from poor crops, but Medfield hopes 
soon to build. Mr. Heteler's large parish, in Campbell, McPherson and 
Mcintosh counties, where we have two churches, Guadenfeld and Rosen- 
feld, and where he is assisted by Mr. Schneider, our farmer-preacher, 
has seen times of drought and famine. The destitution among these 
.new, and mostly poor, settlers, caused by the failure of crops and the 
.severe winter, has been extreme. Our other churches have sent assist- 
ance to the utmost of their ability ; but, nevertheless, the suffering was 
and still is great. But the Spirit of God has used these providences to 
lead many a heart to see the transitoriness of earthly things, and has 
lifted it up to behold the eternal treasures given of God, so that this 
.field, while extremely poor, offers just now a most inviting work for the 
.Society, because ripe for the reaper. 

"Cheyenne, in Wyoming Territory, is under the care of Mr. Lange, 
who also serves the Second English church of that city. Patient and 
prayerful work will produce results by and by in this field, too. 

" In California work has been begun in Fresno and Tulare counties, 
and one church,with eight members, is organized at Selmaby Mr. Nagel, 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 143 

from the St. Chrischona Mission House in Switzerland. We did not 
seek the work, but it sought us. A Christian family in Fresno county 
felt the religious destitution of the German population in their vicinity 
weighing upon their hearts, held prayer-meetings, and wrote to St. 
Chrischona for a missionary. He came, began work, made the acquaint- 
ance of some English Congregationalists in that neighborhood, and felt 
himself drawn to us. For sixty miles around he visits the German set- 
tlers, gathers them into school or private houses, and breaks to them 
the Bread of Life. 

"Our two churches in Washington Territory are still served by Mr. 
Fruiht ; lonely outposts who need reinforcement. 

"Looking at the field as a whole, it is full of promise for the future, 
although in some parts of it the change of workers and other circum- 
stances may retard progress for a short time. That our faith and 
polity are adapted for the work among the countrymen of Luther lias 
been proved over and over again. Our country churches in Nebraska 
and Dakota bear witness to it, and if we have but few churches in the 
large cities, where the problem we have set ourselves to solve is the 
greatest, it is solely because we have not yet raised up enough of the 
right kind of men, and have not interest and faith enough to expend 
adequate sums of money for such work. Let the following compara- 
tive statement serve as proof that I am right in saying we are adapted 
for work among the Germans. In 1883, the year when the Society made 
its new departure in work among the immigrants, w T e counted: 

" Twenty-two German churches, with 898 members ; reported fifty- 
six accessions (about six per cent.), and £-196.58 in contributions, or 
about fifty-five cents per member. In 1887 we report: Fifty-seven 
churches, with 1,871 members ; erection of newly organized churches]; 
278 accessions (about fourteen per cent.), and $1,898.68 in contribu- 
tions, or about $1.01 per member. 

" It would be pleasant to linger a little while in reviewing these four 
years, but this brief statement shall suffice. To have been allowed to 
have a share in this work during these years, is a source of gratitude 
and of genuine joy. Of the personal work done in them by your Super- 
intendent he will not speak. Called of God to lay down this work in 
order to follow the voice which more than five years ago bade him ' go 
far hence unto the Gentiles,' he would humbly lay it at the feet of the 
great Master, and ask him to accept it as a service of love, in spite of all 
its imperfections and failures. Nothing can be added, nothing can be 
taken away from it by him. May God make it increase in power as the 
years roll on ! To his brethren, the pastors of the German churches, he 
is sincerely grateful for the hearty co-operation with which they have 
sustained him; to many of the pastors and members of our English- 
speaking churches he will always hold himself under obligation for 



144 THE- HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

their sympathy, their warm interest, their words of counsel and en- 
couragement ; to the officers of the Society he expresses his most 
cordial gratitude for the confidence reposed in him, and for the free, 
unhampered way in which they have allowed him to work. A stronger, 
abler, worthier man will, God granting it, be found to lead on this work 
to become the power in the evangelization of our German population 
which it ought to be." 

SCANDINAVIAN DEPARTMENT. 
Rev. M. W. Montgomery, Minneapolis, Minn., Superintendent. 

Mr. Montgomery writes : " The work among the Scandinavians has 
steadily developed during the past year, notwithstanding the fact that 
the Superintendent, during the last six months, has given only part of 
his time to the work, by reason of being on a vacation. He has, how- 
ever, kept up the large correspondence, and given special attention to 
the finding of suitable men for the Chicago Seminary, that we may soon 
have a supply of trained missionaries, which is the chief need of the 
work. 

" Thirty-seven Scandinavian missionaries have been employed during 
all or part of the year, including some students from the Scandinavian 
department of Chicago Seminary. Great zeal has characterized the 
work of these missionaries. The preaching is decidedly evangelistic, 
and the number of meetings held almost incredible. Most of them 
have, for weeks in succession, averaged one service daily, and a service 
among these people means one of two to three hours' duration. Rev. 
Fridolf Risberg, Swedish professor in Chicago Seminary, traveled 
among the Swedish communities hi the United States during his last 
summer vacation, and preached an average of nearly once a day for five 
months. These missionaries, as a rule, occupy wide circuits, and thus 
reach a large number of destitute communities. It is not uncommon 
for them to preach in thirty to forty different places during a single 
quarter. This circuit feature of missionary work is very popular with 
these people. 

" Better acquaintance between Mission Swedes and Congregational- 
ists has developed mutual confidence. Heartily co-operating in mis- 
sionary work and in Chicago Seminary, and beginning to do the same 
in Carleton College, distrust of each other disappears and friendship 
grows apace. 

" But the feature of the year's work of overshadowing importance is 
the remarkably large attendance of Scandinavians in our Chicago 
Theological Seminary. Sixty-eight applications for admission were 
received; about two-thirds of these were accepted, and forty-two 
students were in attendance — twenty-six Swedes and sixteen Nor- 
wegians and Danes ! This most gratifying result would be ample after 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 145 

many years of labor to that end, but that it- should come in the second 
year of the opening of the Swedish department, shows the great need 
there was for such a school and the divine blessing upon its opening. 
A glance through the lust catalogue of that seminary will fill the he \xi 
wil h joy to see that, at last, our Congregational people are reaching 
out among our immigrant populations in a practical, common-sense 
way. The very names of these students, as they stand in the catalogue, 
are an inspiration to all who would have our missionary work embrace 
the many nationalities among us. 

" The work among the Norwegians has scarcely been begun for want 
of suitable men. Norway is calling for us to send trained ministers 
over there, and numerous places are calling for Swedes and Norwegians 
who can preach not only in their languages but also in English. In 
many places in the Northwest only such missionaries can meet the 
wants of these communities." 



CONCLUSION. 

The sixty-first year of the Society's history has been one of decided 
contrasts. It has been a year of drought, and consequent failure of 
crops throughout large portions of the West, yet the benevolent con- 
tributions from these very sections are larger than ever before, and 
this revival in giving has been followed by revivals of religion, in ful- 
fillment of the divine promise, "Bring ye all the tithes into the store- 
house, and prove me now herewith, if I will not open you the windows of 
heaven and pour you out a blessing." It has been a year of debt, and 
consequent anxiety on the part of the officers and friends of the Society, 
and suffering on the part of the missionaries. Yet it has been a year 
of rejoicing because of a wonderful deliverance from debt. It has been 
a year during which the receipts from legacies fell off $108,013.56, an 
unprecedented shrinkage ; yet, during this very year, the gain in con- 
tributions from the living is $70,612.69, which is also unprecedented. 
It has been a year during which the receipts fell short of the half- 
million reached for the first time last year, and yet the expenditures 
have exceeded the half-million, and also exceeded the expenditures of 
last year. It has been a year during which the advance contemplated 
at the last Anniversary has not been made, and yet a very substantial 
advance has been made, for the number of missionaries has been in- 
creased by over one hundred, and the number of new churches organ- 
ized reaches one hundred and thirty-five. 

If these facts are borne in mind, and also, that the number of 
Sunday-schools organized and the number of conversions and additions 
to the churches exceed those of any other twelve months of the 
Society's history, then the Sixty-first Tear may rightly be called 



14G THE HOMH MISSIONARY. July, 

A Successful Year ; on the ivhole, the most successful in the Society's 
annals. 

Here is sufficient cause for rejoicing on the part of all the friends 
of Home Missions. Here is encouragement for the fearful and faint- 
hearted. Here is abundant occasion for devout thankso-ivino- to 
Almighty God from whom all our blessings flow. 
In behalf of the Executive Committee, 

Walter M. Barrows,) 

Joseph B. Clark, } Secretaries. 



WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT. 



Saratoga put on her best dress in honor of the Woman's Meeting 
this year. The sunshine was never brighter nor the air more invigor- 
ating, nor the June sky more enchanting than on Wednesday afternoon, 
at two o'clock, while the largest church in the town was rapidly filling, 
even to its aisles, with those interested in woman's work for Home Mis- 
sions. No one who looked into those upturned faces could fail to be 
impressed with the earnest and genuine interest stamped upon each. 
It was a rare inspiration. These women had come together not for 
amusement but for information and guidance in the grand and solemn 
work before them. The following brief report of the meeting by Mrs. 
Joshua Coit, of Massachusetts, will be read with interest. Extracts 
from the addresses will be given in The Iljme Missionary during the 
summer months. 

THE FIFTH ANNUAL MEETING 

of the Woman's Department in connection with the sixty-first anniver- 
sary of the American Home Missionary Society was held on Wednesday, 
June 8fch, at 2:30 p.m. The increasing interest in this ladies' gathering 
was manifested by the prompt filling of the large church. After sing- 
ing by the congregation the meeting was called to order by the Secre- 
tary, Mrs. H. M. Shelton. Mrs. Joshua Coit, of Boston, was chosen 
scribe. A roll-call of States showed the number of representatives 
from each as follows : Vermont, 25 ; New Hampshire, 12 ; Massa- 
chusetts, 100; Rhode Island, 15; Connecticut, 40; New York, 10; New 
Jersey, 12 ; Ohio, 4 ; Michigan, 1 ; Illinois, 1 ; Iowa, 1 ; Minnesota, 1 ; 
Dakota, 1 ; Tennessee, 1. The officers of all State Branches were invited 
to sit upon the platform. 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY 147 

Mrs. F. K. Ilegal, of Ohio, read from the Scriptures the last chapter 
■of the 1st Book of Chronicles — David's thanksgiving to God for the 
liberal offerings for the Temple. 

Mrs. ¥m. Kincaid, President of the Woman's Home Missionary- 
Union of New York, led in prayer. 

Mrs. Shelton then introduced Mrs. C. H. Taintor, of Chicago, as the 
presiding officer for the afternoon. She spoke of the pleasure it gave 
her to greet the ladies, and of the rest and inspiration which she gained 
last year at Saratoga. 

The Minutes of the last meeting were read by Mrs. E. P. Bronson, 
Secretary of the Woman's Home Missionary Society of Missouri- 
Mrs. Shelton read the Aunual Report, which can be obtained in 
leaflet form (No. 28) by application to the Woman's Department of the 
Society. 

The congregation, led b}' Mr. Geo. C. Stebbins, sang the hymn, 
"In the cross of Christ I glory." 

Mrs. Geo. M. Lane, President of the Woman's Home Missionary 
.Society of Michigan, " the Banner State in Auxiliaries," gave an address 
on Woman's State Unions, in which she eloquently impressed upon the 
ladies' the necessity of earnest, consecrated, and united work for the 
salvation of America and the world. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stebbins favored the meeting with a fine rendering of 
Miss Havergal's " I could not do without Thee." 

Mrs. Caswell, representing The Home Missionary and the '-Bur- 
den-Bearers There and Here," said : " After an editorial experience of 
eighteen months, I have come to believe that if each member of the 
Church of Christ were to take a turn at the editorial wheel of our 
home missionary machinery there would not be known another backward 
movement in God's work, because, from this point, the whole wide 
field lies before you, and you are brought face to face with its actual 
condition and need." Mrs. Caswell then gave us some glimpses of the 
Burden-Bearer at the front, struggling to plant the standard of the 
cross in a God-forsaken region, and standing manfully by it with heroic 
endurance until a permanent foothold can be obtained. The Burden- 
Bearer at this end of the line was also brought to our notice in his 
patient endurance of constant self-denial that the '-largest half of his 
little all " might be used in the work. The speaker, in closing, read a 
letter from a lady who, with a limited income, has been able to assist 
the Society during the year in the support of twelve missionaries. The 
question was then pressed home, " If one woman can do this for iicelve 
missionaries, ought not each one present to economize somewhere, and 
do it for one?''' Owing to the demand for this letter, it will be printed 
in leaflet form, and may be obtained by application for " No 40. One 
Woman's Yiew of Giving." 



148 THE HOME MISSIONARY. July, 

The hymn, " Crown Him Lord of all," was sung, after which Mrs. C. 
A. Richardson, of Chelsea, Mass., read a paper on " Our Work among 
the Bohemians," which told of the encouragement there is in efforts for 
the education and evangelization of this people. She gave a picture of 
them as found in Bohemia, and of the change made by the light of the 
gospel when received by them, and spoke of the danger that the Roman 
Catholics might gain control over them in this land. 

She was followed by Rev. G. M. Sanborne, of Arkansas, who told of 
Rogers Academy, and its field and work. This academy was started 
four years ago, in Northwestern Arkansas, a region largely settled by 
New Englanders, who, anxious that their children should be educated, 
gave liberally for the institution. The number of pupils this year is 
284, an increase of 99 over last year. The academy is under the care of 
Professor Scroggs and four other teachers. 

Mr. Lewis, a Pole, the only man of their nation working among the 
Poles, told a very interesting story of his life after he became a Chris- 
tian ; how he went to his shop and tried to proclaim God to his coun- 
trymen. They thought him out of his mind ; when he asked them to be 
saved, they did not know what he meant. When they asked him ques- 
tions about the Bible, he found he could not answer them. He did not 
know about the Bible, and so began to pray the Lord to give him time 
to study the Bible. After his day's work was over, and he had washed 
and had supper, he was too tired to study, and what could he do ? At 
the same time brother Schaufner, at Cleveland, was praying to the Lord 
for a man to work among the Poles. '-He sent for me," said the 
speaker, "and said, 'Brother Lewis, would you like to study?' I say, 
' Yes ; why not ? ' He said he would send me to Oberlin. This was 
what I had been praying for. Then the devil came after me, and said : 
' I would not go ; you are too old ; people will laugh at you.' But I 
went." Mr. Lewis gave an account of his work at Cleveland, selling 
Bibles to the Poles. They were very glad to get them, but then- priests 
soon found it out, and went from house to house taking them away. 
Many would be glad to read the Bible, but fear the priest. 

Mrs. A. J. Drake, of Iroquois, Dak., gave one of her unique, unre- 
portable talks. Taking up her story where she left it last year, she told 
us that the church at Iroquois was finished, paid for, and dedicated; 
that the church at Esmond was all done but the tower, " and we must 
have a tower, you know, to count, because the Bible says, ' Go about, 
and count the towers thereof.' " They had a stone-bee, and the men 
came to draw the stone. "Men work better in 'bees,' as well as women. 
We always have a dinner at our bees, which helps men on wonderfully. 
Then we had a rafter-bee, and a raising-bee, and a shingling-bee, and so 
the church went up, and then we had a lathing-bee, when every woman 
brought a hammer, and we all nailed laths. When we were almost dis- 



1gg7 THE HOME MISSION A BY. - L ^'' 

couraged, a letter came from the American Congregational Union, say- 
ing 'We will give you $250.'" Mr. and Mrs. Drake have charge, as 
pastor and assistant pastor, of five churches and ten congregations, 
covering fifty miles one way, and seventeen the other. She said, « Mr. 
Drake goes one way, and I another. Sundays I have four appoint- 
ments and my housework to do, and I do it nice, too !" 

A gold thimble had been given to one of the ladies for the cause of 
Home Missions, and it was proposed, as a child's gold ring once built a 
church, so this should build a parsonage. This thimble is now in the 
hands of Mrs. C. H. Taintor, Chicago, 111., who has already commenced 
collecting the "Thimble Parsonage Fund." When a sufficient amount 
has been received, the thimble will be presented to the missionary wife 
who occupies the parsonage. 

A gold watch and chain were also presented— which are to build a par- 
sonage in Dakota, for Mr. and Mrs. Drake, who now occupy rooms under 
their church at Iroquois, and who must be moved to a home above- 
ground without delay, if they are to be kept much longer "in the flesh," 
and in the work. 

An impromptu collection resulted in $215 for Mr. Schauffler's Bohe- 
mian work. The hymn, " Blest be the tie that binds," was sung, and 
the exercises were closed by a prayer by Rev. Dr. Clapp. 



A MEETING OF THE OFFICERS OF THE WOMAN'S STATE 
HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETIES. 

The meeting was held in the Congregational church, Saratoga, at 
10 a.m., June 7th, 1887, in response to a letter of invitation sent out 
some months ago by Mrs. Kincaid, President of the New York Home 
Missionary Union, asking for a conference of State officers. The fol- 
lowing responded : 

Mrs. Wm. Kincaid, New York; Mrs. L. H. Cobb, New York; Mrs. G. 
M. Lane, Michigan ; Mrs. E. P. Bronson, Missouri ; Mrs. C. H. Taintor, 
Illinois; Mrs. C. C. Creegan, New York: Mrs. E. J. Mahony, Ohio; 
Mrs. F. K. Regal, Ohio. 

The meeting organized with Mrs. Kincaid in the chair, and Mrs. 
Regal, scribe. The following programme was then discussed : 

" Ought the women in our home missionary churches to be excused 
from aiding in our State organizations?" This paper, written by Mrs. 
Goodell and read by Mrs. Bronson, of Missouri, was discussed by all 
present. The variously expressed, but haimonious, theories on the 
subject were supplemented by the logic of facts, all strengthening the 
conviction that aided churches would, by connection with State Home 



150 THE HOME MISSIONARY. 'Tuly y 

Missionary Societies, be so quickened in their activities and general 
usefulness as to hasten thereby the day of their self-support. 

In the absence of the State officers, Mr. Hood, of Wisconsin, spoke 
briefly of missionary work in the " New North," or northern peninsula 
of Michigan and Wisconsin. His remarks were confined chiefly to 
Wisconsin. He spoke of the threefold resources of the State — the 
mines, the forests, and the soil. The mining is done mostly by Poles 
and Bohemians, the lumbering by other immigrants ; but successful ag- 
riculture required Yankee skill and experience. The ladies' missionary 
work is being carried on successfully there, and is distributed among 
three or four of the national societies. They have been especially 
active in church and parsonage building, of which the whole region is. 
in great need. 

The next subject was "Penny-a-week Contributions," or, Systematic 
Giving. Mrs. Lane, of Detroit, opened this subject with a wholly un- 
reportable talk, of which the text was the language of an English 
woman, that "Circumstances halters cases." The discussion of this 
topic was participated in by all present ; all agreeing that while sys- 
tematic giving was immeasurably better than spasmodic giving, care 
must be taken not to set the mark too low. 

Afternoon Session. — Paper by Mrs. A. Blanchard, of Kansas, on 
" Methods of Communication between State Officers and their Auxil- 
iaries." This pajoer furnished a fruitful theme, as it touched a difficulty 
everywhere experienced. All were agreed that a personal visit from 
the right person was altogether the most helpful thing possible. Some 
thought that it would payback liberally to employ and pay an officer to 
go about as an organizer of new, and strengthener of existing, societies. 
Next best was the personal letter, and next the printed leaflet. Two 
States have issued a printed paper as their organ, and found it very . 
helpful, but involving great labor, which few officers could assume with- 
out compensation. It was difficult to drop this subject, and take up 

" The Advantages of Pledged Work." This topic was opened by 
Mrs. Cobb, of New York. It covered the plan of working for definite 
objects, as salaries of missionaries and teachers, tuition of pupils, par- 
sonage?, etc ; and had its companion topic, "Unpledged Work," which 
was to have been given by Mrs. S. M. Hotchkiss, of Connecticut, 
been presented, the discussion would have been less one-sided. The 
missionary letters received by those assuming definite objects to sup- 
port, prove very stimulating and helpful. 

The final topic, "Co-operation of State Societies," was presented by 
Mrs. Kincaid. After duly considering the plan of a national organiza- 
tion, of an annual meeting like the present, and of a triennial meeting, 
it was finally voted that Mrs. C. H. Taintor, of Illinois, be asked to as- 
sume the responsibility of a meeting like the present, to be held in con- 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 151 

nection with the next annual meeting of the American Home Mission- 
ary Society; that she invite the attendance of all State officers, or regu- 
larly appointed substitutes, prepare a suitable programme, and arrange 
for the meeting. 

No brief report can exhibit the interest felt in this meeting. It was 
a rare treat to be allowed a share in it. The papers read will appear 
from time to time in the Woman's Department of The Home Mission- 
ary. — Mrs. Flora K. Regal, Scribe. 



New Leaflets. — Number 28. Annual Keport of Woman's Department. 
29. The Kesponsibility for Missionary Debts. 30. An Experiment in 
Systematic giving. 31. Heaven- Sent. 32. Light Out of Darkness. 
33. Emergency Women. 34. A Little Brother and Sister. 35. Those 
After-dinner Coffee Spoons. 36. What the Deacon Said. 37. Helen 
Harrison's Awakening. 38. The White Guards. 39. How I became 
a Home Missioravy. 40. One Woman's View of Giving. A Cate- 
chism about the Bohemians. A Sunday-school Concert Exercise about 
the Bohemians. 



THE AMERICAN EDUCATION SOCIETY APPOINTS A WEST- 
ERN SECRETARY. 

The Board of Directors of the American College and Education 
Society on April 13th, at Boston, by unanimous vote, appointed the 
Rev. Theo. T. Gardner, of Hudson, O , to be the Society's permanent 
Western Secretary. 

This action, repeatedly recommended by the Ohio Association, has 
been taken after Mr. Gardner's experimental work of eighteen months in 
Ohio. Michigan and Wisconsin, and with the cordial approval of lead- 
ing men in our educational work in the West. 

The Directors are convinced that the personal supervision of a 
Western Secretary is henceforth needed to secure in the West an in- 
telligent and practical sympathy with this Society commensurate with 
the aid it dispenses for the ministry in Western institutions. 

The Directors earnestly commend their Western Secretary to the 
cordial welcome and co-operation of Western pastors, churches, eccle- 
siastical bodies, and colleges and seminaries. 



152 ' THE HOME MISSIONARY. July 

WOMAN'S FUND FOR MISSIONARY SALARIES. 

District of Columbia, Washington $10 00 

New Jersey, Montclair 150 co 

$160 00 



CHILDREN'S BOHEMIAN FUND. 

Colorado, Denver $12 90 

Dakota, South, Ree Heights 75 

Massachusetts, Plymouth 10 00 

$1,564 95 
Previously acknowledged $1,541 30 



MISSIONARY BOXES. 



For many years the ladies of our churches have helped this Society and cheered the 
homes of its missionaries with boxes of clothing and other useful articles. The continuance 
of these favors is earnestly solicited. To secure satisfactory preparation and just distribu- 
tion, attention is invited to the following suggestions. 

1. Apply to the Secretaries to designate a family needing such assistance, and state, 
if practicable, how soon a box will probably be sent. 

2. If a family is selected without applving to the Secretaries, notify them without delay 
so as to guard against a duplication of gifts. 

3. If several months should elapse before the box is ready to he sent, ascertain from the 
Secretaries whether the missionary's address remains as previously given. 

4. Mark the box plainly and indelibly, fasten it securely, and forward it to the missionary, 
not by express, but by a Forwarding Company, if practicable ; otherwise, as "fast freight," 
by railroad, taking two receipts from the Company. 

5. Write to the missionary, inclosing one of these receipts, a list of the articles sent in 
the box, and the money, $2, $ 3, or .$4, according to weight and distance, for the payment of 
freight (if it cannot be prepaid ). Mention, also, the name of the person to whom a letter 
of acknowledgment should be addressed. 

6. Keport to the Secretaries the forwarding of the box, its estimated value, and the 
amount sent for freight, in order that the donation may be acknowledged in The Home 
Missionary. 

7. If a box has been prepared, not for a specified family, but to be assigned by the 
Secretaries, put into it a list of its contents, the name of the association or individual from 
whom it comes, and the address of the person to whom the missionary may send his letter of 
acknowledgment. 

8. Mark the box. ''American Home Missionary Society, Bible House, Astor Place, New 
York," adding the name of the place from which it comes. 

9. Write to the Secretaries, inclosing money for freight, and stating the time when and 
the line by which the box was sent, its estimated value, and giving a list of contents to guide 
in the assignment of the box. Be careful to state the size of each adult, and the age and 
sex of each child for whom the clothing is intended, as boxes are not opened at the office. 

10. These donations are not deducted from the grants of the Society. It needs the same 
amount of money, therefore, in order to fulfill its stipulations with its missionaries, as if no 
such gifts were provided ; and we trust the friends of Home Missions will not withhold or 
diminish their contributions of money in consequence of their giving other things that are 
needful. 



WOMAN'S STATE H. M. ORGANIZATIONS. 

New Hampshire Female Cent Institution, org.) Wisconsin, Woman's Rome Missionary Society 



org. Oct., 1S83, Mrs. C. Matter, Brodhead, Sec. 
North "Dakota, Woman's Home Missionary Soci- 
ety, org. Nov., 1S83, Miss S. E. Judd, Fargo, 

Sec. 
South Dakota, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Sept., 1S84, Mrs. W. H. Thrall, Armour, 

Sec. 
Connecticut, Woman's Home Missionary Uuion, 

org.Jan.,1885, Mrs. S. M. Hotchkiss, Hartford, 

Sec. 
Missouri, Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. May, 1885, Mrs. E. P. Bronson, 31u0 

Chestnut St., St. Louis, Sec. 
Illinois, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

May, 1835, Mrs. C. H. Taintor, Chicago, Sec. 
Iowa, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 
org. Oct., 1833, Mrs C. C. Creegan,Syracusel! Org. June, 1S815, Miss Ella Marsh, Grinnell, Sec. 
Sec. I 



1805, Miss Annie A. McFarland, Concord, Sec, 
Minnesota Woman's Home MissionarySociety, org. 

1S72, Mrs. H. L. Chase, Minneapolis, Sec. 
Nebraska Woman's Home Miss. Association, org. 

Oct., 1374, Mrs. E. H. Baker, Sutton, Sec. 
Maine, Woman's Missionary Auxiliary, org. June, 

1830, Mrs. Levi L. Paine, Bangor, Sec. 
Michigan, Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. May, 1381, Mrs. Mary B. WarreD, Lansing, 

Sec. 
Kansas, Woman's Home Missionary Society, org. 

Oct., 1881, Mrs. Addison Blanchard, Topeka, 

Sec. 
Ohio, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

May, 1882, Mrs. Flora K. Regal, Oberlm, Sec. 
New York, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



153 



APPOINTMENTS IN MAY, 1887. 



Not in commiteai/on lost year. 

Badertscher, Gottfried, Warrenville and Coon- 

tow n, N. J. 

Bosworth, U. c, Genoa, Neb. 

Clapp, Cephas P., Bast Oakland, c.il. 

Dyas. Joseph t*., Frankfort and Athol, So. Dak. 

Henshaw, George, Sharon, w. Perm. 

Kloasner, John, Scotland, So. i>ak. 

Loba, Victor B., Siloam Springs, Ark. 

Osgood, Lueian B., Carthage and Canova, So. 

Dak. 
Sctaenerle, Gottlieb, New Hope and Fiiedens, 

Neb. 
Scoville, Edgar E., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Smith, John II. 15., Jetrnore and Harold, Kan. 

Re-commissluticil. 

Andridge, Andrew A., Rhinelander, Wis. 
Angier, Marshall B., New York City, N. Y. 
Asiimun, Edward H., Beatrice, Neb. 
Biker, Benjamin F., Udall aua Seely, Kan. 
Beute, Christopher n., East Rockaway, N. Y. 
Bingham, Charles M., Daytona, Fla. 
Bradley, Albert I., Chase, Kan. 
Courter, J. E., Ford, Kan. 
Crawford, Sidney, Tampa, Fla. 
Cressman, Abraham A., Wahoo, Neb. 
Croswell, Micah S., Rogers, Ark. 
Dilley, Alexander 15., Malabar and Lake Worth, 

Lucie and St. Sebastian, Fla. 
Douglas, Clinton, Faulkton, So. Dak. 
Edwards, Stephen, Georgetown, New Mex. 
Enibree, John II., Doniphan, North Hastings and 

West Hamilton, Neb. 
Fordney, Darnel L., ' Cole Camp and Twin 

Springs, Mo. 
Foster, Richard B., Milford, Kan. 
Gearhart, diaries D., Wakonda and Beresford, 

So. Dak. 
Gross, Alfred, Doaksville, Long Creek and 

Wheelock, Iud. Ter. 



Gwynne, Frederic R., Wilkesbarre, E. Penn. 
Hicks, William li., McAllister and Lehigh, Ind. 

Ter. 
Hill, Emmetl C. W., Meadville, Mo. 
Jennings, Samuel J., Big Horn, Becton, Sheri- 

dan, ana Prairie Dog, WyO. 
Jewell, George C, Cortland and Hartford, Ohio. 
Jones, John, Coolvill and Center Belpre, Ohio. 
Jones, Thomas <;., .Mineral l.'idge, Ohio. 
La Bach, James ML, Paris, Tex. 
Lund, Roben E., White Oaks, New Mex. 

Lose, T. Claire, Osborne, Kan. 

MeDuffee, Samuel V., Orange City, Fla. 

McKean, John, Intertachen, Fla. 

MLargeson, Berridge, Demiog, Ind. Ter. 

Marvin, johnT., Graceville and Appleton, Minn. 

Medlar, William H., Crookston, Minn. 

Morgan, Lewis, Soudy, Tenn. 

Nonis, Thomas F., North Lawrence, Kan. 

Pamment, John ML, Portland, Or. 

Pierce, Robert S., Phelps Co., Neb. 
Reuth, Jacob, La Grange, Mo. 

Richardson, Albert M., Tonganoxie and Kan- 

waka, Kan. 
Riddle, Merchant S., Junction City, Kan. 
Roberts, John, Silver Creek, Neb. 
Rominger, Henry V., Albany, Or. 
Kose, William P., Pierre, So. Dak. 
Scofieid, William C, Washington, D. C. 
smalley, Albert L., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Smith, L. A., At wood and Celia, Kan. 
Spring, John W.. Linwood and Lenape, Kan. 
Stafford, Burnett T., Norwalk, Kerr City and 

Riverside, Cal. 
Stone, Rollin S., Chatham, N. J. 
TajUr, Albert W., Elliugton, N. Y. 
Tenney, Marcus D., Neosho Falls, Kan. 
Travis, David C;., St. Louis, Mo. 
Wheat, Nathaniel M., Vinita, Ind. Ter. 
Whitman, John S.,Canfield,Ohio. 
Wickes, Emerson G., Oak Hill, Fla. 
Woolman, William, Naponee, Neb. 
Wurrschmidt, August, Huron, So. Dak. 



RECEIPTS IN MAY, 1887. 



MAINE— $108.56. 

Bath, Central Ch., bv F. S. Partridge.. $25 00 

Biddelord, Secenu, by G. W. Carter it to 

Calais, First, by A. L. Clapp & en 

Farmington, First, by A. Russell 18 46 

New Castle, Ch., add'l and in full to 

const. A. W. Gliddon a L. M., by Rev. 

C. D. Crane 1 00 

Y'armouth, First, by Rev L. Reynolds. . . 5 10 

NEW HAMPSHIRE-$424.03; of which 
Legacy, $200.00. 

Concord, A Friend, by L. D., Stevens.. 50 00 
Derrv, Legacy of Dr. M. Meriam, byM. 

Meriam.Ex 200 oo 

Francestown, Cong. Ch., and Sunday- 
school, add'l, by A. Dowues 8 03 

Hancock, A birthday gift from an aged 

friend 1 00 

Haverhill, Eliza Cross 2 00 

Milford, First, by A. C. Crosby, to 
const. F. W. Sawver and E. E. Arm- 
strong L. Ms 120 75 

Pelham, A Frieud, spevial 2 25 

Sanbornton, by Rev. F. J.Ward 20 00 

Wilton, Second, by C. Wilson 2o t'O 



VERMONT— $32.00. 

Middlebury, E. J. Mathews $2 00 

Norwich, Mrs. C. M. Smith 5 00 

WestRandolph.Cn 25 00 

MASSACHUSETTS— $T,32S. 63 ; of which 
Legacies, $3,915.00. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. B. 
Palmer, Treas 1,000 00 

Amherst, W. M. Graves, $lu; A Friend, 
$10, by W. M. Graves 20 00 

Auburudale, Mrs. N. J. Iugraham 1 40 

Boston, Woman's H. M. Assoc, by Mrs. 
H. H. Proctor, Treas 222 26 

Charlestown, Legacy of Miss Hannah 
B.Sweetser, by W, Abbott, Ex 200 00 

Chesterfield, add'l by Rev. E. Loomis.. 5 00 

Dorchester, Mrs. Eleanor J. W. Baker, 
special 100 CO 

Fitchburg, Remainder of Legacy of 
Miriam W. Partridge, by D. Messen- 
ger, Ex 715 00 

Rollston Ch., A Friend 10 10 

Florence, by W. L. W ilcox 20 06 

Groton, On account of Legacy of 
George Farnsworth, Ex 3,000 00 



154 



THE HOME MIS IONARY. 



July, 



Hadley, First Parish Ladies' H. M. Soc, 
by Mrs. Edwin Smitli, in full, to const. 

Mrs. Charles Newton a L. M $'29 00 

Hopkinton, First, add'l, by J. W. Stew- 
art 2 00 

Worth Leominster, Mrs. A. G. Boutelle's 
Sunday-school class, for Children's 
Bohemian fund, by Miss C. Hobart. . . 6 30 
Plymouth, Pilgrimage Sunday-school, 
Primary Dept., for Children's Bohe- 
mian fund 10 oo 

Rehoboth, by P. A. Bliss 35 25 

Sheffield, by H. Dutcher 10 60 

Shclburne, First, by Z. D. Bardwell, 
Treas., to con3t. Miss Fannie M. Bard- 

weil a L. M 50 00 

South Deerfleld, Ch., $20; Sunday- 
school, $3.85, by Dea. C. A. Stowell. . . 23 85 

Spencer, C. W. Powers and wife. 1 00 

Springfield, Carrie E. Bowdoiu, in full, 

to const, her a L. M 20 00 

Stoughton, First, by D. C. Rose 8 GO 

Taunton, Winslow Y. P. S. C. E., add'l, 

by E. K. Dean 3 75 

West Acton, Mrs. Rev. J. W. Brown. .. 5 00 

Whitlnsville, by E. Whitin 1,801 56 

Williamstown. A Friend 25 00 

Worcester, A Friend 3 00 

RHODE ISLAND— $54.03. 
Bristol, First, by P. Skinner, Jr $42 53 



Kingston, Cong. Ch., by B. E. Heltue.... 
Newport, A B'riend's Thank offering. 



9 00 

2 50 



Thomaston, Mrs. Mary R. Watrous, 
dec $100 

Woodbridge, Y. P. S. C. E., by K. W. 
Beecher 7 50 

Woodburv, North Ch., by A. SV. 
Mitchell 15 00 

NEW YORK— $572.36. 

Received by Rev. C. C. Creegan : 
Lisle, Ch. and Sunday-school... $10 36 

Oswego 21 oo 

31 3« 

Received by Mrs. L. H. Cobb, 
Treas. Woman's H. M. Union: 
Binghampton, Woman's Aux..$50 00 
Gloversville, Ladies' Benev. 
Assoc, of Cong. Cli., by Mrs. 
C. Stewart 25 00 



75 00 
50 00 
25 00 

5 00 



41 00 



CONNECTICUT— $7,0S7.86 ; 
Legacy, $1,000.00. 



of whicii 



Received r>v Mxe. S.M. Hotchkiss, 
Sec. Woman's Home Miss. Union 
of Conn.: 

Fairfield, Ladies' H. M. Soc $1T oo 

Suffield, Young Ladies' H. M. . 
Circle 16 50 



33 50 



Branford, First Ch., of which from Rev. 
H. P. Bake, $10 ; H. G. Harrison, $10 ; 
E. D. Sheldon, $7, and in full to const. 

Mrs. Elizabeth J. Steer a L. M 45 53 

Center Brook, Mrs. E. E. Kelsey 1 40 

Connecticut, A Friend 100 oo 

Daubury, First, by H . "SV. Frost 270 70 

Derby, A Friend 1 00 

East Haddam, A Friend 10 0') 

Enfield, D. H. Abbe 5 00 

Fairfield, Cong. Sunday-school, by S. 

C. Morehouse 6 35 

Gilead, Mrs. F. L. Brown, by Rev. C. 

W. Preston 5 00 

Greenwich, Second, special, by L. P. 

Hubbaid 35 11 

A Friend 100 00 

Guilford, Ladies of the First Ch., by 

Rev. E. M. Vittum 30 00 

First, in full, to const. Miss E. Jennie 

Knovvles a L. M., by E. W. Leete 20 00 

Hartford, Legacy of Caroline Law- 
rence, by E. K. Beardsley 1,000 00 

Huntington, Y. P. S. C.E.,by Miss 

Ella L. Wooster 5 on 

Litchfield, Y. P. S. C. E. of First Ch., 

of C. H. Coit 30 17 

AFriend 5 00 

Lyme, Elizabeth Gris wold 5,000 00 

New Haven, Cb. of the Redeemer, J. B. 
Baldwin, $100; Dea. Sherman, $50, by 

J. B. Baldwin.... 150 00 

Ch. of the Redeemer, W. E. Chandler 10 00 
Northfield, by H. C. Peck, in full, to 
const. Dea. W. M. Hopkins a L. M.. . . 22 no 

Plainville, A Friend 60 

Sharon, add'l, by Rev. J. R. Bourne.... 2 00 

Stamford, First, by E. B. Hoit 6 00 

Stonington, OoDg. Ch., add'l, by Rev. 

C. J. Hill 131 00 

Terry ville, by G. M. Allen 39 oo 



SO 43 


1 00 


4 33 


4 00 


10 00 


8 00 


45 00 


33 62 


8 12 


12 50 


1 00 


5 00 


3 00 


19 00 



Albany, Miss Mabel Lea rned 

Black Creek, by' Rev.' H. W." H.' Wat- 
Una 

Brooklyn, A Lady, $10; A Friend, $1 ; 
Mrs. J. M. Van Cott, $5 ; F. B. Marsh, 
$25 

Cambria Center, Cong. Sunday-3chool, 
by C. T. Comstock 

Canandaigua, First, by Rev. E. G. Ty- 
ler 

Danby, T. A. Van Gelder 

Eldred, by Re v. H. P. Hamilton 

Granville, by Rev. T. M. Owen 

Homer, by Rev. W. A. Robinson, D.D.. 

Lysander, by J. B. Gillett 

New York City, Miss Caroline Murray, 
$10 ; A Lady of Madison Square Presb. 
Ch.,$10; C. P. HuntiDgton, $25 

Norwich, oy J. Hammond 

Ogdensburgh, by Rev. J. S. Ainslie 

Richmond Hill, Union Ch., by A. Allen. 

Riverhead, Mrs. S. Whaley 

Rochester, Miss E. Leavenworth 

Upper Jay, Harriet P. Wells 

Warsaw, by W. A. Walker 

Keceived by Mrs. L. H. Cobb, 
Treas. Woman's H. M. Union : 
Hammondsville, Woman's Aux. $5 00 
Ironville, Woman's Aux 8 30 

$13 30 
[Erroneously acknowledged in June.] 



NEW JERSEY— $238.47. 
Montclair, Young Ladies' H.M. Soc, by 

MissC. L. Snyder 17 13 

Ne wneld, Mrs. A Moody 5 00 

Orauge Valley, by J. Bell 140 34 

Passaic, First, by Rev. S. F. Palmer.. . 26 00 
Summit, Central Presb. Ch.. by D. H. 
Cooley, to const. Rey. T. F. White, 
D.D.,aL. M 50 00 

PENNSYLVANIA— $69.28. 

Carbordale, by Rev. D. L. Davis 13 60 

Drifton, by Rev. J. F. Humphrey 5 00 

Ebensburgh, Ladies' Miss.' Soc, by Mrs. 

Hill 8 00 

Minersville, First Welsh Ch., by R. 

Ricketts 20 no 

Pittston, First, by Rev. H. J. Whitby... 20 00 
Spring Creek and West Spring Creek, 

by Rev. A. B. Sherk 2 68 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA-$35.00. 

Washington, Ladies' H. M. Soc. First 
Ch., special, by Miss L. Patterson — 25 00 
Ladies' H. M. Soc, of the First Ch., 
special, Woman's Dept., by Miss L. 
Patterson 10 00 

WEST VIRGINIA— $19.57. 

Ceredo, by Rev. A. H. Chittenden $19 57 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



155 



FLORIDA— 136.00. 

Hawkes Park and New Smyrna, by 

Rev. J. A. Ball $10 00 

Lake Wort!) ami Malabar, by Rev. A.B. 

DiilfV 20 00 

Mannfield, by Rev. E. R. Fuller 2 oo 

Philips, by Rev. S. Rose 4 oo 

INDIAN TERRITORY— f 7. 50. 

McAllister and Lehigh, by Rev. \V. II. 

Hicks 5 00 

Vinila, by Rev. N. M. Wlicat 2 50 

NEW m;:x ico— $56.00. 

Doming, by Rev . B. Margeson 6 00 

Socorro, Rev. J. L. Allison 30 00 

OHIO— $934.29. 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser : 
Cleveland, Euclid Avenue Ch., 

by T. Bates $71 69 

Findhiv, by Rev. J. P. Riedlnger 7 93 
Madison, Mrs. II. B. Fraser. by 

Rev. J. M. Fraser, to const. 

Asa S. Hardy, O. W. Hardy 

and ttoy E. Hardy L. Ms 150 oo 

Nelson, Sunday-school, by G. 

Payne 4 69 

South Newbury, by Dea. H. P. 

Green 13 36 

Wauseon, by Rev. J. IX Nutting 17 41 

265 01 

Received by S. P. Churchill, Treas. 
Bohemian Board, Cleveland, in 

Al "' U: «i nn 

Anonymous *i w 

Brooklyn Village, by Miss Ho- 

nart.. 10 TO 

Cincinnati, Columbia Sunday- 
school 20 00 

Cleveland, Euclid Avenue Ch...U5 79 

Plymouth Ch 25 00 

Greenwich, Sunday-school 2 49 

204 98 

Bellevue, S. W. Boise 26 00 

Cleveland, by J. H. Hull 5 80 

Collinwood, by Rev. C. L. Hamleu 11 00 

Coolville, Mrs. M. B. Bartlett, by Rev. 
C K Dickinson, in full, to const. Misg 
Mary J. Bartlett, Miss Maggie A. 
Adams and Miss Vary B. Orear L.Ms. 100 00 

Cuyahoga Falls, by C. Clark J 12 

Mansfield, First, by E. B. Caldwell 171 38 

Ohio, Chs. and Individuals, by Rev. R. 

Cjuaife ■ ■■■■■■■ 13T 00 

Rochester Depot, From a lew Old La- 
dies by Mrs. E. C. Cummings 2 00 

Sylvania, by Rev. S. R. Dole 5 00 

INDIANA-S4S.G7. 

Macksville and South Vigo, by Rev. J. 

Hayes 2 5_ 

Ontario, by Rev. J. P.. Preston 37 i 1 

Princeton. Mrs. M. A. Conant 4(i 

Terre Haute, by M. J. Weiss 6 to 

ILLINOIS— $91.26. 

Aurora, Y. P. S. C. E. of First Ch., for 

Debt, bv W. N. Tucker $14 15 

Blooming'tou, A Friend 10 On 

Geneseo, Ladles' Mi9s. Soc, Mrs. A. H. 

Manington 65 11 

Princeten, An Aged Friend, A Thanfc 

offering 5 00 

Riverside, W. u. Gardner, $5 ; Master 

Soon Gardner, $* !• •• 



MISSOURI— $923. TO. 

Received by Mrs. H. A. Brown, 

Treas. Mo. Woman's 11. M. Soc.: 

Hannibal. Mrs. W. H. Loomis... $2 00 

Hyde I'ark, L. II. M.S. of Cong. 
Ch., by Mrs. J. E. Green 11 10 

Kansas City, L. II. M. S. ol 
Clyde Cong. Ch., by Mrs. J. K 
Harris 6 23 

St. Louis, Ladies' H. M. Soc. ol 
First Ch., bv Mrs. Brown 12 00 

Webster Groves, I* n. m. s. of 
Cong. Ch., by Mrs. J. P. Hel- 
tensteser 15 oo 

«46 '23 

Brookfleld, Y. P. S. C. E. of Cong. Ch., 

by Rev. S. W. Delzell 8 05 

Brookline and Republic, by Rev. J. 

Stevens vi f o 

Cameron, by Rev. F. O. Alger 10 05 

Carthage, Ladies of the Cong. Ch., by 

Mrs. L. k. Kimball 13 43 

Dennison, by Rev. C. W. Holden -z, 00 

EldOD, by Rev. J. Vetter 1 00 

Kansas City, First, by J. F. Downing.. 511 ^4 

Clyde Cong. Ch., by C. P. Emery 248 52 

Sunday-school, by E. A. Fussell 15 00 

Memphis and Honey Creek, by Rev. T. 

C. Johnston 3 00 

Republic, Cong. Sunday-school, by T. 

N. Merrill 1 05 

St. Louis, Fifth Cong. Ch., by L. J. 

Peck 36 00 

Springfield, by Rev. J. F. Giaf 5 00 

Windsor, by Rev. J. G . Bailey 10 62 

MICHIGAN— $231.29. 

Benzonia and Homestead, by Rev. O. 

B. Waters 28 12 

Cedar Springs, $2.50 ; .Sand Lake, $6, by 

Rev. £. C. Harrington 8 50 

Cheboygan, by Rev. W. S. Bugbey 8 77 

Columbus, Woman's Miss. Soc, by Rev. 

W.I.Hunt 10 99 

Curry and Thayer, by Rev. E. S. Curry 2 43 
Eaton Rapids, by A. C. Dutton, to 

const. Sara H. Kellogg a L. M 65 00 

Franklin, by Rev. H. A. Putnam 4 20 

Greenvdhe, Mrs. R. L. Ellsworth 10 00 

Haucock, Cong. Ch. add'l, bv Rev. C. 

F. Waters 29 36 

Matiawan, by Rev. E. Herbert 1 00 

Minden City, by Rev. W. Scurr 4 76 

Northport, by Rev. C. D. Banister 28 75 

Rondo, $1.07 ; Wolverine, $1.30, by Rev. 

M. Tuct. : 2 37 

Rosedaie, by Rev. J. W. Holt 55 

St. Ignace, by Rev. C. E. Taggert 1 00 

Sherman, Cleon and Marilla, by Rev. 

R. Redeoff 17 00 

Standish, by Rev. D. Curry 2 50 

IOWA-S20.C0. 

Iowa, A Friend of Missions , 15 00 

Maquoketa, by Mzry C. Shaw 5 00 

MINNESOTA— $524.2 1. 

Received by Rev. J. H. Morley^ 

Brainerd. First Ch $10 54 

Elk River, Union Ch 2 31 

Groveland .' 1 00 

Medford 5 0O 

Minneapolis, Plymouth Ch 58 S4 

Vine Ch., $19.65; Mission 

Band, $5.91 25 56 

Winona 115 69 

$218 34 
Received by Mrs. J. N. Cross, 
Treas. Minn. Woman's H. M. 
Soc: 

Fairmont, L. M. S 8 75 

Hamilton, Easter Offerings u 50 

Maaeppa, L. M. S 5 60 



156 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



July, 



Minneapolis, Plymouth Ch., 

Woman's H. M.'s $29 oo 

Plymouth, Y. P. M. S 5 50 

St. Paul, Plymouth Ch., Wom- 
an's H.M. S 100 00 

Plymouth Sunday-school... . 12 61 

Spring Valley, W. 11. M. S 5 on 

Sterling, W. H. M. S 4 00 

Winona, Woman's H. M. S 50 00 

$231 S3 $450 20 

Amiret, bv Rev. P. K. Peregrine 5 00 

Barnesville, by Rev. J. W. Todd 4 00 

Par well, Annie Wiberg, by Rev. G. 

Wiberg 25 

Freedom, bv Rev. W. Fisk 2 60 

Granite Falls, by Rev. L. W. Chaney... 13 58 
Grass Lake and Brunswick, by Rev. G. 

Staaf 5 oo 

• Hamilton, by R. F. (ingle la 18 

Janesville ana Morristown, by Rev. W. 

J. Parmelee 1 50 

Little Falls, by Rev. K. Pasco 2 50 

Mapleton ami Sterling, by Rev. L. H. 

Moses 12 50 

Minneapolis, A Friend 150 

Sherburne and Triumph, bv E. carter. 4 00 

Stillwater, by Rev. J. W. Carlson 2 50 

KANSAS— 1254.08. 

Received by Rev. L. P. Broad : 

Nickerson $15 53 

Russell 5 82 

21 35 

Received by Rev. J. G.Dougherty, 
Treas. Kan. H. M. Soc: 
Lawrence, Ladies' II. andF. M. 

Soc, of Plymouth Ch 11 00 

Randolph, J. H. Dow, -'A Mis- 
sionary Pig " 3 00 

Sterling Cn 3d 00 

44 oo 

Alma, by Rev. W. C. Wheeler 8 00 

Bloomington ana Diai, by Rev. F. G. 

McHenry 1 00 

Buffalo, Center Ridge and Scatter 

Creek, by Rev. J. Wilde 8 78 

Eureka, by Rev. R. H. Kead 6 25 

Gaylord and Twelve Mile Run, by Rev. 

H. P. Page 7 00 

Haven and Alt. Hope, by Rev. L. Hull. 1 S5 

Kir wiu, by Rev. R. F. Markham 5 30 

Leavenworth, First, by G. H. Hyde 61 30 

Manhattan, by J. W. Blain 35 00 

Sedgwick, Cli.,$0; Rev. H. S. Payne, 

$4, by Rev. H . S. Payne 10 00 

Se very, by Rev. J. Cooper ... 5 25 

Stockton, by Rev. F. E. Sherman 11 oo 

Topeka, students of Washbarn College, 

by R. H. Harper 2 50* 

Wabaunsee, First Ch. of Christ, by Rev. 

J. F. Willard 50 

Wyandotte, S. F. Mather 25 00 

NEBRASKA— J437.S7. 

Received by Rev. J. L. Made : 
ArOorville, by Rev. J. E. Storm. $15 00 

Fairmont, by S. S. Elder 18 50 

Sunday-school, by C. II. Aber- 

nethy : n 50 

Hastings, add'], by Rev. W. 

Walters 1 ou 

Irvingtou, by E. L. Brewster. .. 26 00 
Omaha, St. Mary's Avenue Ch., 

by E. A.Mills 202 00 

274 00 

Alpiue and Macon, by Rev. W. H. 

Houston 5 00 

Beatrice, by Rev. E. H. Ashmun 65 37 

Coi tlaud, $5; Pickrell, $3.50, by Rev. H. 

Bates 8 50 

Prankiin, Ch., $50; Rev. F. Barber, $6, 

by Rev. e. S. Harrison .»►. 56 00 

Friend, by Rev. J. Lieu 5 00 



Hay Springs, by Rev. B. F. Diffen- 

bacher $2 50 

North Bend, by Kev. J. Harrison 18 00 

Ogalalla, by Rev. J. A. Tiiorne 5 00 

Rusnviile, by Kev. w. P. Eastman T 00 

St i at ton and Trenton, by Rev. G. W. 

Rich 5 00 

Syracuse, by Rev. E. H. Baker 1 50 

Weeping Water, Y r . P. s. c. E., for 

Debt, bv Rev. G. Hiudley 25 00 

Wy more, by Rev. J. V. Dimon 10 00 

SOUTH DAKOTA— f SO. 25. 

Aurora aud Volga, by Rev. H. A. Law- 
rence 2 50 

Clark, by Rev. L. Kingsbury 4 00 

Colvin, bv Kev. H. H. Beiuent 2 5.) 

Elk Point, by Rev. L. P. Sabm 15 00 

Huron, First, by Mrs. B. M. Kowley 47 00 

Lake Henry, by Rev. F. Q. Appieton... 2 00 
D. Ross and wife, by Rev. F. G. Ap- 
pieton 2 00 

Powell, by Rev. J. T. Lewis 4 50 

Ree Heights, Mrs. John Harvey, for 

Bohemian Fund 75 

COLORADO— $40.28. 

Colorado Springs, Y. P. S. C. E. of the 

First Ch., by E. B. Curtis $3 50 

Denver, by Rev. A. W. C< ff man 5 00 

Park Avenue Ch., $1S.S8; Park Ave- 
nue Sunday-school, for Children's 
Botiemian fund, $12.90, oy J. M. 
Leitch 31 78 

WYOMING— $3.50. 

Big Horn, Becton and Sheridan, hy Rev. 
S. J. Jennings .*. . $3 50 

MONTANA— $25.00. 

Helena, First, by A. E. Bunker $25 00 

UTAH-$14.00. 

Hooper, Rev. A. B. Peebles $10 00 

Park City, by Rev. I . R. Prior 4 00 

CALIFORNIA— $132 . S3. 

Received by Rev. J. H. Warren: 

Berkeley $12 50 

Crockett 1 20 

FresQo, Rev. VV. N. Meserve 5 00 

Hay wards 10 00 

Oroville 11 33 

40 03 

Eureka, by Rev. D. Bowman 30 00 

Green Valley, by Rev. R. Taylor 5 00 

Oakland, by Rev. W. S. Hamlin 6 00 

By Rev. W. H. Cooke 6 30 

Y. P. S. C. E. of the Market Street 
Ch., for the Debt, by Hattie E. Ben- 
ton 1 50 

San Bernardino, by Rev. C. A. Stone. . . 30 00 

San Miguel, by Kev. E. B. Tuthill 4 00 

Sunol Glen, by Rev. O. G. May 10 00 

OREGON— SS6.75. 

Albany, First, by Rev. H. V. Ro linger. $53 00 
Astoria, Mrs. Wilson, by Rev. G. H. At- 
kinson 1 00 

Beaverton and Portland Heights, by 

Rev. L. Ke Isey 2 55 

East Portland, by Rev. D. Staver 30 20 

Oregon City, Ch., J-J0.80; Y. P. S. C. E., 
$25, for the Debt, by Rev. G. A. Rock- 
wood 45 SO 

[Erroneously acknowledged in May.] 

WASHINGTON TERRITORY— $53.90. 

Received by Rev. N. F. CJWeigh : 

Cheney $1 55 

Farmington 2 15 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



157 



Natchez $2 15 

Norm Yakima, Upper Columbia 

Assoc 7 PO 

Wenus 1 fO 

West Kittitas 18 00 

$27 05 

Mt. Pleasant and Washougal 5 00 

Spokane Falls, Cong. Assoc, of Upper 
Columbia, by Rev. G. 11. Atkinson, 

D.D ' 1" 00 

Walla W';ill:i. P'list, t,v (.. Hum 00 

Y. P. s. C. E., of lM.vinoutl, ch., by 

A. E. ( uslunan 5 85 

Home Missionary 140 17 

$20,164 43 

Donations of Clothing, etc. 

Albany, N. Y., First Ch., by D. A. 
Thompson, i> >.\ hymn books. 

Brick Church, N. .)., II. M. Adams, box 
books. 

Bristol, Conn., Ladies' Home Miss Soc, 
by Mrs. N. L. Brewster, two barrels.... $119 30 

Brooklyn,lN. Y., Ladies of. Plymouth ch., 
by Amy E. Halliday, bundle. 
Ladies 1 Benev. Soc, of south Ch., by 
Mrs. J. II. swift, box 20000 

Hartford, Conn., Ladles' Sew. 80c, of 
First On., by Miss Emma Bunce, two 
barrels, c isb and freight 105 00 

Homer, N. Y., Ladies' Home Miss. s< c, 
by Ellen F. Phillips, two barrels 121 99 

New Haven, Conn., Kev. S. W. Baruum, 
Six copies " Romanism as it is." 
Ladies' Aid Soc, of United Ch., by A. 

K. Merwin. box. cash and freight 358 54 

N. Y. City, N. Y., Wm. Abbatt, bundle. 
Dr. L. H. Cobb, package magazines. 

North Actou, Mass., Sunday-school, two 
barrels. 

Orange, N. J., Ladies' Benev. Soc, of 
Trinity en., by Miss Harriet E. Haisey, 
box, cash and freight 226 CO 

Pierce City, Mo., First Ch., by Rev.Geo. 8. 
Kicker, seven vols., '• Spurgeon's 
Treasury of David," and freight 11 50 

St. Joiiiisburg, Vt. , Woman's Home Miss, 
S ic, of North Ch., by Mrs. A. E. Ran- 
kin, box 156 72 

Sheffield, Mass., Mrs. R. F. Little, two 
barrels 120 00 

Terre Haute, Ind., Home Miss. Soc, b7 
M. J. Weiss, box 23 75 

Receipts of the Maine Missionary Society, from 
March ~ith to May, 1887, JOHN L. CROSBY,7Yeas. 

Albany, Dea. J. H. Love.joy $5 00 

Alna. ch., by Miss Alice Nelson 8 00 

Bangor, First Parish S. 8., by C. A. Bailey. 11 65 
Bath, "A memorial gut for a daughter," 

by Rev. J. O. Fiske, D.D 10 00 

Bar Harbor, Cn., by Rev. J. Torrey 16 28 

Bucksport, Elm St. Ch. and Soc, by E. 

Swasey, Tr 

Dexter, Ch., by Augustus Cnmmlogs, Tr. 
East Baldwin, On., by Mrs. Frank Brown. 
Fast Bangor, Ch., by Rev. J. E. Adams... 
Eliot, Ch. and Soc, by Rev. James Lade.. 
Ellsworth, Ch., by Erastus Redman S8 



Presque Me, ch., by Rev. Ceo. Christie.. $10 00 
Sidney, Ch., bv Joel Spauldlng, Esq., to 

const, himself a L. M 20 00 

Skowhegan, ch., by Rev. A. J. Rackliff.. 15 25 
South Bridgton, Mrs. Mary B. Filch, by 

Rev. w. it. Hague 2 50 

Soma Gardiner, Ch., i>v Mrs. M. J. v. 

Ilortoii 8 00 

Tiionia-t on, Legacy, add'l, Airs. 11. c. 

Ludwig .' so 00 

Veazie, " Sociable," by Kev. J. E. Adams. 10 00 
Weils, Legacy, Mrs. L. W. Maxwell, by 

B. Maxwell, Esq 100 00 

West Newlield, i.'\i., bv E. II. Svnies 15 06 

Windham, First Ch., by J. w. Doughty. 9 00 
York, Second Ch. and Soc., by J. H. 

Mo idy 10 00 

Woman's Malae Missionary Auxiliary 140 00 

Rev. J. E. Adams, Sec'y, received for 

preaching 18 00 

Income from Stocks, etc 207 33 

$1,344 87 
Previously acknowledged $22,772 7 7 

Total receipts June Pith, 1886, to date. ..$24,1 17 64 



Receipts from May hlth to May 31 sf, 1SS7. 



$10 00 



54 83 


11 00 


5 00 


6 00 


12 83 


S8 34 


5 00 


5 00 


7 10 


24 00 


4 64 



Ellsworth Falls, Ch., by F. E. Hartshorn. 

Freedom, Ch.. by Rmaldo Elder 

Holden, ch., by 'Rev. J. E. Adems 

Kennebnnk, Onion Ch. and Soc, by Hon. 

Jos. Titcomb 

Lincoln, Ch., by Rev. J. E. Adams 

Litchfield Corner, Ch. and Soc, by D. F. 

Smith, Tr 10 00 

New Case j, from Mrs. Ruth Merrill 25 00 

Portland, Legacy, from "A friend," by 

R. H. Hinckley, Esq 200 00 

State St. Ch., by W. S. Corey, Tr 200 00 



10 00 



45 



20 00 
5 50 



14 00 



S 00 

9 00 

21 50 

17 50 

IS 00 



Acton, Ch. Soc, by Rev. Wm. A. Merrill. 
Bath. Central Ch. Soc, by F. S. Part- 
ridge, Tr 25 00 

Bangor, Central Ch., from Mr. Walter 
Brown 

Biddeford, Second Ch., by Geo. W. Car- 
ter, Tr 20 00 

Bingham, Ch., by Rev. T. F. Millett 5 00 

Boothbay, Ch. Soc, bv Key. S. D. Evans. *22 55 

Buxton, Ch. Soc. by Rev. G. W. Johnson 

Calais, ch. Soc, by A. L. Claipp, Tr. for 
South Anson Ch 

East Bangor, Ch., by Rev. J. E. Adams... 

Eastport Central, Ch. Soc, by G. A Pea- 
body, Tr 

Edgecomb, Ch. Soc, by Rev. c. G. Hol- 
yoke 30 06 

Foxcroft and Dover. Ch. Soc, by C. II. B 
Woodbury, Tr 32 32 

Freeporl, First Ch. Soc, by Augustus 
Peunell 

Garland, Ch. Soc, by Rev. J. E. Adams.. 

Houlton, Oh., by Rev. C. H. Percival 

Jonesport, CH., by Rev. E. S. Walbridge. 

Lebanon, Ch. Soc, by Kev. Josiah Clos- 
son 

Limerick, Ch. Soc, by W. Adams 18 00 

Lisbon, Ch., by Mrs. E. W. Coombs 1 00 

Machias, Center St. Cong. CO., by A. L. 
Heatou, Tr 7 53 

Marshfield,Cli.,by Kev. J. E. Adams 4 50 

Portland, Willistou Ch., by G. F. Thurs- 
ton, Tr 40 00 

Richmond, Ch. Soc. by Rev. W. C. Cur- 
tis. 

Rockland, Cong. Sabbath-school (for 
Soutn Anson ch.) 

Searsport, First Cong. Ch , by E. B. 
Sheldon 

Sebago Lake, Society, by Miss A. M. 
Lowell 

Sherman Mills, •'Wasnburn Memorial" 
Ch., by Rev. I. O. Burupus 

Solon, Ch., by. Rev. T. F. Millett.-. 

South Berwick, Oh. Soc. ($20 of which to 
const. Dea. Madison Riley a L. M.), by 
J. H. Plumer, Tr 100 00 

South Paris, Ch., by A. W. Bolster 13 00 

Southwest Harbor, Ch. Soc, by Rfv. a. 
Redlon :• 

Staudish, Ch. Soc, by Miss A.M. Lowell 

Turner, On., by Rev. A. N. Jones 

Union, Ch. Soc, by Rev. T. V. Norcross. 

Waldoboro, Oh., by. Mrs. Belle B. Gard- 
ner, $20 of which const, her a L. M 26 60 



10 00 
8 00 



35 50 



23 



5 00 

4 25 



14 00 
10 77 
10 65 

7 50 



Fourth Ch. by Rev. J. G. ^VilsoD 20 00 \Yest Auburn, Cn., by H. M. Packard. . IS 60 



158 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



July, 



West Brooksville, Ch , by Rev. W. J. 

Skelton SS 00 

Yarmouth., First Ch. Soc, by L. Reynolds. 73 50 

Woman's Me. .Missionary Auxiliary 358 80 

Income from Stocks, etc 258 62 

$1,313 53 
Amount previously acknowledged $24,117 04 

Total receipts from June 12th, 1SS6, to 
date $25,431 17 



Receipts of the Xew Hampshire Home Missionary 
Society, from March 1st, to May 31st, 1837, L. D. 
Stevens, Treas. 

Amherst, Edward Boylston, to const. 

Mrs. Abby F. Dodge a L. M. of A.H.M.S $50 00 

Atkinson S 79 

Bennington 9 35 

Concord, First 200 0o 

A Friend 2 00 

A Friend 10 00 

A Friend 50 00 

Concord, West 24 00 

Center Harbor 8 62 

Chichester, Legacy of Augustus Leavitt.. 310 00 

Claremout, Legacy of Geo. N. Farwell... 500 00 

De>rfield Center 10 40 

Banbury 4 00 

Epping, JohnM. Fitz 5 00 

Fitzwilliam 15 00 

Gllmantou 16 59 

Goffstown, Legacy of Miss Frances Mor- 
rison, to coDsr. Miss Fanny Gibson and 

Mrs. Samuel Upton L. Ms 266 66 

Greenfield, Sunday-sohool 6 00 

Greenland 33 00 

Greenville 1 00 

Haverhill, to const. Mrs. Athalinda Jen- 
kins a L. M 39 00 

Hempsteadl 18 50 

Hollis, to const Enoch J. Colburn a L.M. 33 14 

Keene, First 134 On 

Second 37 25 

Lebanon, Legacy of Sarah Kinsman wo 00 

Marlboro, Ch. and Soc, $6.09; S.S.,$10.. 16 09 

Nashua, First 54 11 

New Ipswich 7 60 

North Conway, Income of Abby K. Went- 

WorthFund 10 00 

North wood, Young People's Miss. Soc. 37 00 

Ossipee Center 11 5u 

Penacock, Ch., and Soc, $8.90; Mrs. A. 

W. Fiske, $7.00 15 90 

Plymouth 3 25 

Portsmouth, North Church 158 10 

Rindge 5 4S 

Short Falls, Ch. and Soc, $8.50; Sally H. 

Moses, to const. W.H. Tripp a L.M., $30 33 50 

Union 16 00 

Wakefield, $17 ; Daniel Smith, $115 132 00 

Walpole 14 00 

Warner 8 09 

Wolfboro'ugh, Interest on Legacy of Nan- 
cy fl. Lord 4 00 

New Hampshire Cent Institution. 156 50 

$2,570 39 



Reoeipts of the Massachusetts Home Missicnary So- 
ciety, in May, Rev. Edwin B. Palmer, Treas. 

Andover, West, by Peter D. Smith $50 00 

Ashburnham, First, to const. J. N. Hast- 
ings and Chas. H. Howard L. Ms., by 
Rev. R. B. Tobey 61 75 

Bedford, Y. P. S. C. E., by C. F. Pressey, 
Debt 15 78 

Beverly, Estate of John D. Jones, by 
John L. Gardner, Ex 100 00 

Boston, A Friend 12 08 



39 80 


10 00 


57 


62 


15 


(0 


10 00 


17 


H7 


:-'9 


22 


17 IS 


3 


on 


51 


•M 


37 


00 


eeo 


00 



Miss C. M. Dyer $5 00 

Estate of Geo. Punchard, by Ezra L. 
Woodbury, Trustee 763 50 

Dorchester, Second S. S., by Miss E. L. 
Tolman 18 83 

Roxbury, Eliut, Rev. B. F. Hamilton, 

D.D 20 00 

By A. McLean 6 no 

Union, by Albert Gay 14 16 

Braintree, First, Ladies' Home Miss, Soc, 

to const. Mrs. Frank Hearing and Mrs. 

W. M. Morrill L. Ms., by Mrs. Julia F. 

Hay ward 85 CO 

Buckland, Mrs. R. D. Field, Birthday gift, 

by Rev. A. C. Hodges 1 (10 

Charlemont, East, "A friend interested 

in Home Missions" 

Chihuahua, Mexico, Rev. A. C. Wright... 
Concord, Trinitarian, by Thomas Todd. . . 
Dartmouth, South, by E. B. Sturtevant. . . 

Cent Soc, by E. B. Sturtevant 

Dedham, First, by C. Guild 

Ueerfield, Orth., t>y Rev. A. Hazen, D.D. 

Douglas, First, by Rev. James Wells 

Easti.n, Mrs. Daniel Belcher (Debt) 

Foxboro, Orth., by Horace Carpenter 

Greenwich, Ladies' Home Miss. Soc, by 

Miss A. M. Root 

Grotcn, Estate of Geo. Farnsworth, by 

Dea. Ezra Farnsworth, Ex 3, 

Hampden Benev. Assoc, by Chas. 

Marsh, Treas.: 

Blandford $37 65 

Monson, Estate of Dea. Marcus 
Chapin, by E. P. Keep, Ex 100 00 

Springfield, First WO 00 

North 31 54 



Hardvvick, Calvlnistic, by Rev. C. M. 

Pierce 

Hyde Park, First, by J. Ellery Piper 

Ipswich, Lineorook, A lady, by J. H. Ten- 

ney 

Bv J. H. Tenney 

Add'l, by Rev. W. P. Alcott 

Lawrence, Lawrence St., S. S. Class of 

W. S. Couch, by N. P. Houghton 

Lexington, Hancock, by Dea. Walter 

Baker 

Lowell, Eliot, by James Howard 

Lynn, Chestnut St., by Rev. Jay N. Taft. . 
Midiileton, Ladies' Home Miss. Soc., by 

C. A. Berry 

Milltmry, Second, by Dea. A. W. Lincoln, 

Thank offering, for Rufus M. Taft's 

work 

Montague. First, by Sanf ord Marsh 

New Bedford (Acushnet), First, by Rev. 

S. C. Bushnell 

Norfolk Co. Conference, nyC. W. Carter, 

Treas 

Northfield, Trinitarian, by Mary T. Dut- 

ton 

North Reading, by Rev. Geo. E. Allen 

Norwood, Ladies' Sew. Circle, by Rev. E. 

Mendell 

Ptnliiystou, by Walter White 

Plymouth. Pilgrimage, by Geo. G. Dyer.. 

S. S., Primary Class, Birthday offerings, 
special for Bohemian work, by Mrs. 

C. T. Holmes 

Quincy, Wollaston, by N. G. Nickerson... 

Reading, by S. G. B. Pearson 

Rowley, to const. Mrs. Lizzie R. Miliett a 

L. M. of the A. H. M. S., by Rev. W. H. 

Dowden 38 60 

Southampton, Y. P. S. C. E., by Rev. 

D. W. Clarke, Debt 6 50 

Southbridge, Evang'l Free, by Rev. S. 

Hayward 26 es 

Taunton, Winslow, by Edgar H. Reed... 49 11 

East, by Rev. E. \V. Allen 4 00 

Waltham, Trinitarian, by G. H. Whitford 62 38 

Wellesley, by D. S. Short, Debt 5 00 

Wellfleet, Fust, Ladies' Missionary Soc. 

Mrs. Kemp T 00 



3 


no 


4-1 


00 


1 


(Ml 


3 75 


1 


0J 


10 


mi 


15 


00 


60 


21 


hi 


no 



20 
55 


no 
£0 


78 25 


20 22 


12 no 
10 00 


5 00 
37 97 
41 07 


10 
14 
26 


00 

no 

00 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



159 



Westhampton, by A. D. Montague $31 CO 

Weymouth and Braintree Union, by II. A. 

PettiDgell 37 66 

Weymouth, South, Union, by Kev. W. II. 

Bolster... ion 03 

Winchester, A friend to missions 3 00 

Worcester, South Conference, by A. 

Armsby, Treaa 24 77 

Yarmouth, First, by Kev. John W.Dodge 86 90 

$5,774 24 
Ilome Missionary 2 55 

$5,770 79 



Donations of Clothing, etc., received and report a at 
the rooms of the Mass. Home Hiss. Sue... in May. 

Boston, Jamaica Plain, Central, Ladles' 
Sewing Circle, bv Mrs. K. W. Wood, 

barrel, box and freight $99 70 

Roxbury, Highlands, barrel unmarked 
and unappraised 

Brookfield, Ladies, by L. C. dough, barrel 
of second-hand clothing 40 oo 

Dalton, Ladies' Sewing Society, by Miss 
Clara L. Crane, barrel, half-barrel and 
freight 126 80 

Greenfield, Second, Ladies' Benev. socie- 
ty by Miss L. I!. Mann, barrel and 
freight 71 25 

Holyoke, Second, Ladies' Her.ev. Soc, 
by Agnes H. Allyn, 4 vols. Smith's Bib. 
Dictionary and express 16 50 

Middleboro, Ladies, by C. T. Wood, bar- 
rel 40 00 

Newton, Eliot, Lathes' Benev. Society, by 
Mrs. A. B. Crosby, two barrels and 
freight 239 36 

Spencer, Ladies' Charitable Society, by 
Mrs. Nathan Hersey, barrel 71 16 

$704 3S 

Receipts of the Missionary Society of Conne;ticut, 
in May, Ward W. Jacobs, Tieas. 

Ashford, by A. H. Byles $3 00 

■Yvon, West, Rev. K. Scoles, personal — 10 00 

Chesnire, by A. C. Peck 9 29 

East Lyme., Niaiitic, by Kev. C. W. 

Hanna 11 65 

ETartf >rd, First, by C. T. Welles, to const. 
Hiss Henrietta Sooter, of Hartford, Ct., 

aL.M 067 22 

Pearl Street, by G. M. Welch 61 98 

Bartland, East, by E, P.Jones 12 50 

Litchfield, Miltou. by Kev. Geo. J. Harri- 

soi? 2 00 

Old savbrook, by Kobert ChapmaD, quar- 
terly 21 43 

Plainneld. Wauregan, by Rev. s. H. Fel- 
lows, $26; Ladies' Benevolent Soc, by 
Miss Alice Bugbee, with above contri- 
bution to const. Miss Emma Mor.se, of 

Wauregan, Ct.,a L. M-, m 50 oo 

Sprague, Hanover, bv Kev. E. W. Menitt 7 00 

Warren, by Tallmadge Swift 48 10 

Winchester, by i. A. Broason 5 60 

West WiHsted, by John Hiusdaie 328 25 



Ames $2 fin 

s. s 20 00 

Aiiiiinosa 45 7T 

Ladies 14 05 

S. s 4 23 

Anita 3 50 

Atlantic, Ladies 4 40 

S. S 10 00 

Avium 28 00 

Baxter 12 75 

Belknap 4 05 

Belle Plaine 15 18 

Y. P. s. C. K 6 14 

Kev. C. II. Bissell 3 68 

Belmond 5 00 

Berwick 2 45 

Big Kock 20 00 

S. S 4 00 

Bradford 5 oo 

Bntt 1 43 

Burlington, Ladies 25 00 

Cedar Rapids 13 26 

W. II. M. U 31 85 

Rev. C. A. Towle 5 00 

Center 6 00 

Central City 14 25 



5 00 
1 00 

6 50 
8 90 

15 71 
4 3<i 

4 90 

5 00 
72 48 
15 35 



Cedar Falls, Mrs. I. C. Gibbs. 

Mrs. M. W. Bartlett. 
Clay 

Ladies 

Clear Lake 

W.H. M. U 

Colesbnrg 

A Friend 

Council Bluffs 

Cresco 

Creston 95 52 

Cromwell 3 48 

Ladies 5 00 

Crocker Center, R. L. McOonnell 5 00 

Davenport, German 5 00 

Ladies uf Edwards Ch 36 00 

Decorah 2 98 

W. H. M. U 31 00 

S. S 15 00 

Denmark „ 30 00 

Des Moines, Plymouth 59 uO 

Ladies . 68 92 

North Park 6 05 

Ladies 9 IT 

North Park S. S 5 00 

Kev. and Mrs. B. St. John 5 00 

Pilgrim, Ladies in 77 

Dubuque 127 S6 

German, S. S 5 00 

Durango 10 00 

Durant 9 75 

Ladies 8 95 

Eagle Grove 3 25 

Eddyville 7 25 

Edgewood 5 00 

El don 31 75 

.Ladies 5 00 

Eldora 12 75 

W.H. M. TJ 6 71 

Young Ladies 7 50 

Mrs. CM. Dm en 1 34 

Elk Creek 5 10 

Elliott 4 V> 

Kxira 9 88 

Fairfield 108 77 

W. H. M. U 7 40 

S. S 10 00 

Farragut 12 00 



$1,23S 02 

Receipts of the Ioita Home Missionary Society, in 
April and May, J. H. Mekkill, Treat. 

Algona, Ch $51 31 

Ladies 8 90 

Alton 7 00 

Allisou 2 i% 



Fayette. 

Ladies 

Fairfax, Ladies 

Fontanelle .. 

Forest City 

Fort Dodge, S. S. ... 

Mrs. L. W. Wilson. 

Gait vllle 

Gilbert 

S . S 

Glenwood, Ladies. . . 

S. S 



12 75 

4 00 
2 00 

10 00 

5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 

4 50 

5 00 
4 0» 

10 90 



160 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



July, 1887. 



Grand River 

Green Mountain. 

W. H. M. U . . . . 

Little Helpers. 
Gowrie, De Witt Yonker. 



, $6 00 

20 00 

32 00 

2 On 

C3 

Grinnell 68 50 

W. H. M. D 18 91 

Friends 55 00 

Hampton 61 30 

Annie Mindell 100 

Hastings, Young Workers 2 59 

Hull 37 3S 

Hunib jldt 10 00 

Ladies 2 05 

Iowa City 38 72 

W. H. M. U 57 50 

Mrs. D. O. GooJrich 25 00 

Gleaners 5 i'0 

s. s 6 39 

Kelley 3 00 

Kell ^gg 6 25 

Keokuk 103 00 

Ladies 40 00 

Keosauqua 72 00 

Lawler 10 00 

Lansing, Mrs. L. II. Hazletou 5 00 

Le Mar*, Easter offering 40 62 

Y. P. S. C. E 10 55 

W.H.M.U. 13 40 

Lima 1 00 

Lyons 28 62 

Madison Co., First 3 96 

Manson 11 0o 

Maquoketa 53 84 

Marion 22 22 

Marshalltown, Ladies 50 00 

AFriend 20 00 

Midland, Ladies 5 OH 

Mitchell ville 7 25 

Monona 10 10 

Monticello 21 25 

Ladies 20 00 

Mount Pleasant 17 39 

Willing Workers 2 »o 

McGregor, Ladies' Easter offering 22 30 

W. H. M. U 14 20 

Newell 16 25 

Rev. and Mrs. A. A. Baker 5 00 

Newton 30 57 

W. H. M. U 10 00 

S. S 5 00 

New York 6 75 

Ogden 20 20 

Old Man's Creek, Welch 8 00 

Onawa. W. H. M. U 6 70 

S. S 5 uO 

Rev. C. N. Lyman 5 03 

Orient 3 00 

Osage 10 00 

W.H.M.U 46 00 

S. S 15 00 

J. A. Smith 50 00 

Ottumwa, First 175 flu 

W. H. M. U 23 00 

S.S 10 10 

Second 5 00 

Otho 6 00 

Rev. N.L. Burton 5 On 

Percival 4 85 

Peterson 8 86 

Pleasant Prairie 2 00 

PolkCity 2 15 

Rev. R. W.Hughes 5 00 

Postville 7 63 

W.H.M.U 10 00 

Prairie Hill 1 00 

Red Oak 15 92 

Rev. A. M. Beman 6 81 

Riceville 1 25 

S.S 5 00 



Kor k Rapids, W. H. M. U $10 00 

Missionary Rills 10 00 

S. S ]3 70 

Rockwell 16 30 

Salem. W. II. M. TJ 17 45 

Rev. D. D. Tibbetts 5 00 

Sergeant's Bluffs 6 40 

Kev. and Mrs. D. W. Coinstock 5 00 

Shenandoah 11 50 

S. S 3 10 

Silver Creek 5 73 

Sioux City, First 145 11 

Pilgrim 13 38 

Sloan 3 45 

Spencer 50 00 

Ladies 10 00 

S.S 6 00 

Staceyvilie 50 80 

Storm Lake 55 50 

Strawberry Point 16 07 

Stuart 46 40 

Tabor 80 00 

Tit ton, Ladies 15 00 

Light-Bearers 5 00 

s. s 10 00 

Traer 12 35 

Union 4 25 

Van Cle ve 20 50 

Victor, Rev. H. L. Marst) 8 00 

Wave, Ma8s.,Hon. VVm. Hyde 100 00 

Waterloo 53 00 

J. H. Leavitt 25 00 

Ladies 23 50 

Warren 2 90 

Ladies 9 40 

Waucoma, W. H. M. U 15 10 

Webster City 4S 50 

Ladies S 00 

Buds of Promise in 00 

Kev. J. D. Wells 10 00 

West Burlington, Kev. Wm. H. Buss 10 00 

Wittenburg, Ladies... 3 00 

$4,001 19 

Receipts of the Wisconsin Home Missionary So- 
ciety, R. A. MCG'ULLOUGn, Treas. 

Arena, Second Cong. Ch $3 50 

Beloit, First, W. H. M. S 11 00 

Uepere, Cong. Ch 33 oo 

Y. P. S. ('. E 10 00 

Evangelistic Service 32 45 

Eau Claire, Second 12 00 

Freedom 9 00 

Friendship 3 00 

Hartland 30 00 

Ithaca 6 37 

Leeds, S. S 4 32 

La Crosse, First 29 27 

Mt. Zion 4 54 

Milwaukee, Grand Avenue 107 74 

W. H. M. S 25 00 

Menasha, E. D. Smith 100 00 

New Chester 6 00 

Oakland, A Friend 5 00 

Palmyra 1 60 

Pewaukee 8 50 

Platteville 88 50 

Pearl Gatherers 5 00 

Y. P. S. C. E 4 25 

W. H. M. S 36 50 

PotOSi 7 25 

Ripon, W. H. M. S 5 00 

Sestonville 1 27 

Stockbridge 8 00 

Siuing Green 5 05 

Waupau 50 00 

S. S 10 00 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 




(ZDIQ-TTIID) 

A preparation of the phosphates of lluie, magnesia, potash and iron with phosphoric acid 
n such form as to be readily assimilated by the system. 

Prepared according to the directions of I'rof. E. N. Horsford, of Cambridge, Mass. 

FOR DYSPEPSIA, 
Mental and Physical Exhaustion, Weakened En- 
ergy, JYervousness, Indigestion, Etc. 

Universally recommended and prescribed by physicians of all schools. Its action will 
larmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take; 

It is the best tonic known, furnishing sustenance to both brain and body It makes a 
leltclous drink with water and sugar only. 

Invigorating. Strengthening, Healthful, Refreshing. 

rnces reasonable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free. Manufactured by the 

Rnmford Chemical "Works, Providence, R. I. 
**- BEWARE OF IMITATIONS !~et 



THE "MANHATTAN" 

OF NEW YORK, 

156 and 158 Broadway, 



" All men think all men mortal but themselves," but there is nothing like a spe 
of sickness to shake one's confidence in the stability of his health and the permanency o' 
physical life. We seem somehow to entertain (vaguely, it may be) the idea that 
insurance may be very properly safely deferred until there are premonitions of declining 
health. This is like waiting for a tire to occur in your neighborhood and then running to 
seek fire insurance when the conflagration is threatening your own house. It is too late 
then to get insurance. The bitter reflection: "It might have been," may then be timely 
enough ; but wishes have no power on that lay to evoke from the ashes the presence of the 
protective policy to restore the property lost by our folly. 

Take insurance on your life now. The new plan of the Manhattan will not only cover 
the contingency of death, but be a saving fund for yourself, to be resorted to in your ad- 
vanced age. 

JAMES M. McLEAN, President. 

J. L. HALSEY, 1st Vice-Prest. H. B. STOKES, 2d Vice-Prest. 
H. Y. WEMPLE, Secretary. S. N. STEBBINS, Actuary. 

AGENTS WANTED. — Active, reliable, and persevering men who desire agencies in the 
State of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, and Missouri are invited to 
correspond with the company direct. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



THE 



Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

OF NEW YORK, 
BICHABD A. McCURIJY, President, 



Is not only the largest Life Insurance Company in 
the world, but has always been the pioneer in all 
matters tending to the popularizing and spreading 
of life insurance and its benefits. 

Its new Distribution Policies are most liberal in 
their terms to policy-holders, and are practically 
unencumbered with restrictions as to occupation, 
residence and travel. 

Policies are payable upon presentation of satis- 
factory proofs of death. 

The Mutual Life Insurance Company's policy 
says to the insured. In plain and simple terms: 
' Pay your premiums, and the person designated by 
you will receive the amount named in this policy 
at your death." This promise is guaranteed by 
gross assets of 

j|114,181,963, 

which are nearly $14,000,000 in excess of the sum re- 
quired under the provisions of the laws of the 
State of New York to meet its liabilities. 

The Mutual Life Insurance Company is a purely 
mutual company. There are no stockholders ;to ab 
sorb profits. Every dollar of profits is divided 
among policy-holders, each of whom is a partner 
with equal' proportionate rights in over $114, 
000,000. 

Profits distributed among members in the last 
ten years: 

$34, 099,475. 

Total payments to policy-holders during same 
period, over 

$243,000,000. 

The following examples of 

Wonderful Results 
of insurance in the Mutual Life Insurance Com 
pany are given for the careful consideration of in 
tending insurers. 

The late Ezra Wheeler, a prominent merchant of 
New York City, became insured in the Mutual Life 
in May, 1S53. For over thirty years he paid his an- 
nual premium in full, and his dividends were 
credited to the policy in the form of additions, ac- 
cording to the following statements: 
Policy No. 11.798. 

Amount, $5,000. Annual premium, $183.05. 

Five-year pe- 
riod ending Additions. 

1858 $610 lf> 

1803 1 ,259 59 

1868 1,311 89 

1873 1,369 32 

1378 1,317 04 

1883 1,318 00 

1885 (two years) 538 00 

Post-Mortem Dividend 109 00 

Total Additions 7,839 00 

Face of Policy 5,000 00 



FIVE PER CENT. COMPOUND 
INTEREST. 

Two Endowment Claims Lately 
Paid. 

Secret of the Mutual's Prosperity. 

In 1S71 a well-known merchant of New York City, 
invested the sum of $3,025.92, as a single premium, 
in the purchase of two 15-year endowment policies 
in the Mutual Life Insurance Company, each for 
the sum of $3,100. The policies were paid on Sep- 
tember 11th, 1886, and the amount which the owner 
received from them was $7,95fi.34, additions having 
been credited according to the following state- 
ment. 

Policies Nos. 124,175 and 124,170. 

Period ending. Additions. 

187f, $603 04 

1881 026 :;<; 

1886 mu 



Total additions $1,756 34 

Face of policies 6,200 00 

Total amount received $7,950 34 

This investment realized over FIVE PER CENT. 
COMPOUND INTEREST, besides insurance pro- 
tection for 15 years. 

The following shows the growth of the Mutual 
Life Insurance Company of New York during the 
past ten years: 



Total Claim Paid $12,839 00 

Total Premiums ' 6,040 05 



Paid by the Company in excess of 
Premiums received $6,798 35 

Since 1875 the annual cash dividend on this policy 
was uniformly larger than the annual premium, 
Ihus making the policy self-sustaining. 



Assets. 

1877 $84,749,807 

1878 8(5,833,340 

1879 88.212,700 

1880 91,529,754 

1881 94,500,49s 

1882 97,746,30-; 

1883 100,912,245 

1884 i03,5s:;,:;oi 

1885 108,431,779 

1886 114,181,903 



Pre- 
miums 
$14,030,153 
13,092,719 

12,687,881 
12,275,589 
12,190,024 
12,845,592 
13.457,928 
13,8.50,258 
14,768,901 
15,(534,720 



New In- 
surance. 
$20,491,920 

28,299,818 
38,394,554 
33,700,759 
34,760,755 
37,234,458 
37,820,597 
34,087,989 
46,548,894 
56,832,718 



There is no company in existence that has shown 
results so profitable to the policy-holder as the Mu- 
tual Life Company of New York, and no other com- 
pany can or does conduct business at so low a cost. 
The result is that the policy-holders get the profits. 
The following table shows the amounts received 
by the Mutual from policy-holders during the last 
ten years, as well as those returned: 

Paid to policy-hold- 
ers for death 
claims, endow 
A mount re- 
ceived from 
policy-holders. 

1877 $14,1130,153 41 

1878 13,092,719 S3 

1879 12.087,881 72 

1880 12,275,589 16 

1881 12,196,0,24 02 

1882 12,845,592 ."0 

1883 13,457,928 44 

1884 13.85U.25S 43 

1885 14,788;901 93 

1886 15,(524,721) 00 



ments and pur- 
chased insurances 
and dividends. 

$13,949,100 48 
14.400,032 13 
14,015,555 48 
13,1(5(1,0,94 40, 
12,040,112 12 
12,848,835 24 
13,959,300 51 
13,923,002 19 
14,402,049 
13,129,103 74 

$134,840,371 06 1188.427,906 25 

The amount returned is 101 per cent, of that re- 
ceived. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



T H E 



UNITED STATES 

Life Insurance Company, 



I1V THE CITY OE NEW YORK. 
(Organized in I860.) 

261, 262 and 263 BROADWAY 

New York, 



C*EO. H. BTRFORD, I»i-esiclent. 
O. P». FRALEIGH, Secretary. 

A. WHEELWRIGHT, Ass't Sec. 



All Policies henceforth issued are incontestable for any cause 
after three years. 

Death Claims paid at once as soon as satisfactory proofs are 
received at the Home Office. 

Absolute Security, combined with the largest liberality, assures 
the popularity and success of this Company. 



ALL FORMS OF TONTINE POLICIES ISSUED 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



Cincinnati bellFoundry Go 



SUCCESSORS IN' BLYMYER BELLS TO THE 

'BLYMYER MANUFACTURING CO 

CATALOGUE WITH 1800 TESTIMONIALS. 



ELLS.CHURCH.SCHOOL.FIRE ALARM 



NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS. 

All letters, orders or communications in 
reference to advertising in The Home Mis- 
sioxary, should be addressed to H. S. 
Chandler, Advertising Manager, No. 251 
Broadway, New York. 



The Independent. 

THE LARGEST, THE ABLEST, THE BEST RELIGIOUS AND LITERARY 
NEWSPAPER IN THE WORLD. 



"One of the ablest weeklies in existence."— PALL MALL GAZETTE, 
London, England. 

"The most influential religious organ in the States."— THE SPECTATOR 
London, England. 

"Clearly stands in the fore-front as a weekly religious magazine." — SUN- 
DAY-SCHOOL TIMES, Philadelphia, Penn. 



IT IS A 

Religious, Literary, Educational, Art, 
Story, Financial, Insurance, Scientific, 
Political, Agricultural, Sunday -School 

NEWSPAPER. 

It has more and abler Contributors than any three of its contemporaries. It 
stands in the front rank of journalism, and every person of intelligence should 
read it. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION. 

One Year $3 00 

Two Years 5 00 

Three Years 7 00 



One Month $ 30 

Three Months 75 

Four Months 1 00 

Six Months 1 50 

NineMonths 2 25 



Four Years 8 50 

Five Years 10 00 



Send Postal Card for a Free Sample Copy, and Clubbing List if you wish to 
subscribe for any Magazines or other Newspapers at less than Publishers' Prices. 

THE INDEPENDENT, 251 Broadway, New York. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 

This Monthly is furmshed at sixty cents a year, postage paid. The ^^^ 
nldnotwellbeless. Itswhole present issue should go to actual subscnbers^ ^£?££ 
•efer to pay, it wiU be sent free, as heretofore, to Life Erectors and Life M ember » , ■ 
,n ies o'f 'the Society and its Auxiliaries ; Ministers securing a yearly ^collection for it m 
te ir congregations; also, to every individual, Association, or C ^.^° n ^leZL 
«ry tendoUars collected and paid over to the Society or an f »^J^^ ™ hy 
wrid accompany the payment. Pastors are earnestly requested to ser Home Missions 
romoting the use of this Journal at the Monthly Concer and among «^P«*J^ be iyen . ■ 

Immediate notice of the discontinuance or change of post-office address should be gl 

APPLICATIONS FOR AI1>. 

Congregations desiring aid should apply at once after finding \ ^f"' ^^ 
,ake a full statement of the facts in their condition and prospects which justify an applic 
[on. They should also give these particulars, viz. : 

Population of the place. 

Names of the church or churches, and preaching stations 

Number of church-members. 

Average of congregation. 

Denomination and size of contiguous congregations 

Names and distances of the nearest Congregational ch " ^s 

Minister's full name and post-office address : Town County, Mate 

Does he reside on his field of labor? Is be installed pastoi? 

Has he any oth^r calling than that of the ministry ? 

Of what local church is he a member? 

Of what Ministerial Association? _ 

The number of persons composing his lamilj . 

Total amount of salary proposed. 

Amount pledged by the people and how secured. 

Has he, also, the use of a parsonage? 

Is aid expected from any other source I 

The least amount that will suffice from the A. H. M. a. 

The amount received from this Society last year. 

Will less probablv be needed next year? 

Amount contributed to this Society last year. How raided. 

Amount contributed to other benevolent socieaes. 

ffitkmal statements concerning the condition, prospects, and wants of the nelrt. 

Date of the desired commission. 

The application must be signed by the officers of the church, where there is one, and by 
the trustees or a committee of the congregation. 

If the ecclesiastical body, witbin who.e limits the congregation is found, has a Com- 
mittee of Missions," the members ot that committee should certify these statements, the stand- 
ing of the minister, his prospects of usefulness there, and indorse the »PP£*^- *»° 
guch « Committee of Missions » exists, the application should be indorsed by two or more 
neighboring clergymen acquainted with the facts. If no church or congregation is yet 
athered applicants will follow the same course, as far as practicable. ■ 

IppSons, after being so indorsed, should be sent to the Superintendent (or Secretary 
of the Auxiliary") for the regiou where the applicants reside. 

Copriat'ions, as a rule, bear the date of a punctual application ; and they never cover 
more than one vear. If further aid he needed, a new application is required containing al 
the particulars named above, and indorsed as before. To tkis the certi^of thernisvonary 
that the congregation has fulfilled its previous pledges for his support, must be added. 

For the address of Superintendents and Secretaries of Auxiliaries, see p. 4 ot cover. 

FORM OF A BEQUEST. 

I bequeath to my executors the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay over the same 

after mv decease, to the person who, when the same is payable, shall ac 
ae Treasurer of the American Home Missionary Society, formed in the City of New York, u. 
the year eighteen hundred and twenty-six, to bo applied tc the charitable uses and purposes o, 
idSocietv. and under its direction. 



july, 



1HH 



AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Bible House, Astor Place, New York. 

Rey. DAVID B. COE, D.D., Honorary Secretary 
Rev. WALTER M. BARROWS DD ) „ 
Rev. JOSEPH B. CLARK, D. D., ' '| Secretaries fcr Correspondence. 

Rev. ALEX'R H. CLAPP. D.D., Treasurer 

Executive Committee •— Mr rnH^jwnpv ™ ■ '• 

T\YI OH n r> • v„ A 4 at™ V « WILE ^> CRou-mon; Mb. WW. HENRY SMITH ; Rev WM 

a™ ShSoJ P^v ^ AMES ^ RoSfe^' ^^^ ' ^ ^ W ™>»™ 
SEPH WILLIAM RICE;Mh HEKBEK?' M dSo£ £l Tr^^ ^ VIRGIN < ^ MB. 
CI« FLINT; WM. IVES WAsTu^K^CS.^ 

COMMUNICATIONS 

Relate to the general business of the Society may be addressed to either of the Secretaries f 
Communications relating to the Worn J^S^lt^ be addressed to 
Communicates re,atin, to the Editorial Department of The ^MiSS^y^JSSdS 

Mrs. H. s. Caswell, Bible House, N. i 

r t, « DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS 

dressed to ai.e.Vr h. Clapp, rrf^^^nTseTIZfZTS York * S ° dety ' may b6ai 
Post-Oflice Orders should be drawn on STATION », New York City. 

A Payment of $50_constitutes a Life Member. ' 

SUPERINTENDENTS. 

Rev. Henri A^ Schauffler, Work among Bohemians. Poles etc 
Rev. George : E. Albbecht, Work among Germans, Chicago. II? 
Rev. M. W. Montgomery, Work among Scandinavians. Minneapolis Minn 



Cleveland, O. 



Rev. LeroyWabren, 

Rev. S. P. Gale. 
Rev. J. H. Morley, 
Rev. Franklin B. Doe, 
Rev. Addison Blanchard, 

Rev. C. C. Otis. 



Lansing, Mich, 
Ind. 

Jacksonville. Fla. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Topeka, Kan. 

N. Mex. 



Rev. John L. Matle. 
Rev. Hikam D. Wiaed. 
Rev. H. C. Simmons, 
Rev. C. M. Sanders. 

J. H. Warren, D.D., 
G. H. Atkinson. D.D., 



Seattle, Wash. Ter.— Rev. Geo. A. Hood 



OF THE 

Rev. Jonathan E. Adams, Secretary, 

John L. Crosby, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev. Edward H. Greeley, D.D., Secretary, 

Hon. Lyman D. Stevens, Treasurer, 

Rev. Charles S. Smith, Secretary, 

J. C. Emery, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev. Joshtta Coit. Secretary, 

Rev. Edwin B. Palmer, Tr'ea surer, 

Edwin Barrows, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev. William H. Moore, Secretary, 

Ward W. Jacobs, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev. Charles C. Creegan, D.D., Secretary, 

Alex'r H. Clapp, Treasurer, 

Rev. J. G. Fraser. Secretary, 

Alex'r H. Clapp, Treasurer, 

Rev. James Tompkins, Secretary, 

Aaron B. Mead, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev, T. G. Grassie, , Secretary, 

R. A. McCollough, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev. T. O. Douglass. Secretary. 

J. H. Merrill. E*q.. Treasurer, 



SECRETARIES AND TREASURERS 



Omaha, Neb. 

Mitchell, Dak. 

Fargo, No. Dak. 

Denver, Col. 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 

San Francieco, Gal. 

Portland. Or. 

Ashland. Wig. 



AUXILIARIES. 

Maine Miss. Soc. 



Bangor, Me. 
at- t," ^ " Bangor, Me. 

N. Uamp. Home Miss. Soc, Concord, N. H. 
,. " _ " Concord, N. h! 

I ermont Bom. " Montpelier, Vt 

M rV ,.. " Montpelier, Vt. 
Mass. Home Miss. Soc, ) 22 Cong. House, 

uk j r 7, , !! " ' Bost '°n Mass. 

Rhode IsVd " « 



Miss. Soc o-f Conn., 

<< <. 

New Yo> \ H. M. Soc 

Ohio • » « 

" U It 

llliyiois " " 

Wis. " « 

a , ( (( 

Iowa " " 



Providence, R. I. 

Hartford, Conn. 

Hartford, Conn. 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

New York City. 

Cleveland, Ohio. 

New York City. 
[ 151 Washington 
I St.. Chicago. Id. 

Milwaukee, Wis. 

Milwaukee, Wis. 

Grinnell, la. 

Des Moines. la. 



/^-z 



'y / L (^11 ' 



THE 



Home Missionary. 



AVCiVST, 1887 



CONTEXTS. 



mi \ Pacer by Mrs. C. L. Goodeli 190 

feo^u^^^ 

RETARY BARROWS'S PAPER •. . "^i,,^ £j FUND... . UM 

partment ; ^to-ntc; 195 

The Need, I he Value, and. the Praeti- ^ATIO^^ ^ — ^ Tg ig5 

cabili ty of the Woman's State Home MLs> ION Ah Y AFi ^ 

v, ssionarj Unions ; lfei RECEIPlb 



Vol. LX. No. 4. 



NEW YORK. 

AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Bible House, Astos Place. 



SIXTY CENTS "A YEAR, IN ADVANCE POSTAGE PAID- 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 

Go Preach the Gospel Mark xvi. 15. 

How shall they preach except they be sent? Horn, x. 15. 

VOL. LX. AUGUST, 1887. No. 4. 



THE TREASURY. 

As usual at this time of the year, the Treasury is empty. Weeks of 
dry summer time are before us, during which, unless the Lord were to 
make windows in heaven, we may not expect it to be materially relieved. 
The receipts in June were about $19,100; in the three months of this 
financial year, about $57,500. The claims on the Treasury, meanwhile, 
average not far from $1,000 a day. 

In accordance with the Society's resolutions and instructions at the 
recent annual meeting, " to pay its missionaries and agents their sal- 
aries without delay," the Executive Committee is borrowing money 
at the banks, on the credit of the Society. Its friends need not be 
told what this means for the next autumn, when the churches come 
together again after the dispersion. We speak of it here that they 
may be prepared to hear of a debt of no inconsiderable dimensions, 
contracted in their name, which they will be asked to pay. We trust 
they will be ready for a prompt response. There are, however, not a 
few churches which are not hindered in this way — some are helped, 
rather, by the summer's accession to their congregations. And there 
are many favored ones among God's people whose income flows as 
steadily in these summer days as in the more active business seasons. 
Will such churches and individual givers bear the cause of Home Mis- 
sions now upon their hearts, and come to the aid of their brethren in 
niany a far western field, whose work knows no cessation in summer's 
heat or winter's cold? 

Postscript. — As the last line of the above " Treasury Note" was writ- 
ten, a New York business man, who was at the Saratoga meeting, came 
in with a check for fourteen hundred dollars ($1,400) to provide for 
paying the entire grant to two missionaries at the front. Not content 
with that, the great-hearted man proj)Oses to provide for paying the 
grants to three more at the same rate. Are there nob others, like- 
minded and able, who would count it a privilege so to be represented 
in our country's great mission field ? Our friend's visit filled the rooms 
with light and cheer. A few more such calls would almost make us 
forget the midsummer's drought and shrinkage. 



162 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

The annual meeting of the Society at Saratoga, in June, has been 
universally pronounced "the best yet." One of the editors of a prom- 
inent religious journal remarked at the close, "From beginning to end 
there has not been one dull address or paper by man or woman T We 
have crowded as many as possible of the good things of the feast into 
the present issue, and " still there's more to follow.*' 

A gentleman said not long ago, " Did you ever think that a man 
cannot give his money away after death? It is not a gift to give what 
you cannot keep or use." How true it is! A gift is an offering of that 
which we are at liberty to withhold. So the truly generous man uses 
his money for the benefit of others while he is alive. — Exchange. 

One of the Society's oldest friends asks, "Are the Home Mission- 
aries amoug the prophets?" and furnishes the following: 

From Rev. Theron Baldwin, in 1831 : " This western country will 
be the great moral battle-ground of the nations." 

From Rev. A. Trent, in 1830: "Illinois is indeed in its infancy; 
but this infant will soon become a giant ; and if the infant has imbibed 
the spirit of practical infidelity, the giant will defend it with all the 
strength of manhood and the deep depravity which pride, and ful]ness 
of bread, and abundance of idleness will generate." 

From an Unknown FpvIend : " This package is from the poor widow 
of a (no longer) poor clergyman, whose heart is full of sympathy for 
the noble band of Home Missionaries. If her purse were equally full 
she would offer no partly worn clothing, but would with joy give of 
her best and choicest to those whose self-denying lives put half-hearted 
Christians to shame. May God bless and reward them, every one. 
And he surely will. Although strangers here we shall meet face to face 
in our Father's house." 

The President of Robert College, Constantinople, Dr. George 
Washburn, is about as clear-seeing a man as there is. In a personal 
letter to one of the leading churches in Wisconsin, he says, among 
other things: "The truth is, I find it better to spend my time in work 
than in talking or writing about it. Still, it would be work well done 
if any word of mine could induce any of your people to consecrate 
themselves more fully to God's work in the world. I live and work 
here because I was called here providentially ; but although I have to 
do here with the making and unmaking of States and Empires in my 
humble way, it seems to me that the fate of the world is to be decided 
where you are. Ycu are in the forefront of the battle for Christ's 
Kingdom. Every one of your people ought to care for the home mis- 
sionary work more than for anything else in this world. You are not 
half awake to it. It is enough to make angels weep to see such a 
society as the American Home Missionary Society halting for lack of 
funds." — The Advance. 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 163 

An Object Lesson. — I return by express the map you so kindly loaned 
me. Please accept my hearty thanks. I know my people would gladly 
second them. My plan was to present the subject of Home Missions so 
as to prepare the minds and hearts of my people for the contributions to 
be taken for that object on the four succeeding Sabbaths. I had} our 
map put up behind the pulpit in full view of the congregation, and by 
the side of it a magnified reproduction of the chart in "Our Country, 11 
contrasting the entire wealth of the churches in 1880, the average annu- 
al increase of wealth from 1870 to 1880 and the animal contributions to 
missions. I made out the dimensions on the scale that would make 
each scpiare one inch, enlarging the chart 169 times. The sermon was 
an object lesson and held the unflagging attention of the people. — Jlev. 
31. C Stebbins, Cornwall, Vt. 

[The map referred to in this letter is the one prepared to show the field of 
the American Home Missionary Society. It is a cloth map of the United States, 
twelve feet by seven, and is well adapted for use in a church or lecture-room. It- 
is sold for what it costs to get it made, viz.. ,fl2.50. 

But if any pastor desires to borrow one of these maps to use in the way de- 
scribed above we shall be glad to accommodate him free of charge. We do not 
believe a better way can be devised for increasing the gifts of the churches to 
Home Missions, than for the pastors to place this map before their people and 
give them facts in reference to the development of our country and the impera- 
tive need of the new communities.] 

Stung to Death. — The moral sense of our country is being stung to 
death, and the seeds of anarchy in industrial and all other vital inter- 
ests are being sown. No power on earth can compare with City Mis- 
sions and Home Missions as defenses against these evils. Besides, they 
more than ten times pay for themselves through their enhancement of 
real estate alone, in city and country. In addition to giving vastly more 
liberally of money to sustain these mission safety-valves, Christian men 
and women should personally do ten times as much mission work as 
they do, in the neighborhoods where they live. The growth of their 
own spiritual life, as well as the country's safety, demands it. A strict 
account of the relative time and money we put into good work, as com- 
pared to what we spend on self, will be a terrible balance-sheet to read 
at the Judgment Day, unless there are radical changes among profess- 
ing Christians. — G. 31. Powell. 

The Mount Pleasant Church, D. C, with a membership of twenty - 
nine, contributes §05.50. 

The church of Rav. A. L. Gillett, at Grand Forks, North Dakota, with 
a membership of forty-three, has this year reduced its application from 
$500 to 8230, besides placing in the home missionary treasury §59.09. 

These glimpses are significant. Have not some of our Eastern Church- 
es yet to learn the first letter in the alphabet of self-denial for the cause 
of Christ? 



1C4 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON SECRETARY CLARK'S PAPER. 

PRESENTED BY ITS CHAIRMAN, SAMUEL B. CAPEN, OF BOSTON. 

The Executive Committee of the American Home Missionary Society 
have shown great wisdom in having Secretary Clark prepare a paper upon 
the financial problem of the Society. It is the most vital question of 
the hour for every Missionary Board. Directly across the pathway of 
progress is this barrier of the lack of means with which to properly 
perform the work of the church. In our report upon this paper we 
would make a threefold division. (1) What has been, (2) What 
ought to be, and (3) How the " ought to be " may come to pass. 

1. What has been. We have been taught, (1) the uncertainty of 
legacies. Last year they were unusually large and this year the oppo- 
site is true. There is, there can be, no law of legacies. They must ever 
be in the realm of the unknown and unknowable. (2) The certainty of 
the gifts of the living. It is very clear that this Society has an ever in- 
creasing hold upon the confidence and love of the churches. With 
every added year it is learning better how to do its work, and how to 
make the most of its grand opportunity. We trust it more because it 
deserves more. (3) We have no hesitation in saying in the most un- 
qualified terms, that the officers of the Society did right in borrowing of 
the bank in November last to meet its obligations. We believe a Mis- 
sionary Society should be governed by the same general principles that 
control any business, or it will fail to receive the full confidence of the 
churches. The question that confronted the Executive Board was not 
whether or not they would borrow. They were already borrowing. The 
question was, of whom should they borrow. Of the banks whose busi- 
ness it is to loan mcney, or of the missionaries in the field. The com- 
mittee, we believe, would have been false to their trust in this emergen- 
cy, if they had not borrowed as they did aud cease making a forced loan 
jfroni their servants. It may be true that the missionaries did not com- 
plain, they are too noble for that. But we believe it should be a funda- 
mental principle in this, and every society never to allow the payment 
of the salary of the missionaries to be delayed one hour. They receive 
little enough at the most. It is an injury to the cause of Christ, to com- 
p3l these men in their various communities, either to owe others, or to 
bo: row at high rates for their daily personal wants. The best work can 
never be done under any such conditions. If any such emergency 
should ever again arise we trust the Board will follow this principle. 
No man ought to accept a position on an Executive Committee, unless 
he is willing to stand back of it to this extent. 

2. In making suggestions for the future, as to " What ought to be" 
we would ask, (1) Cannot all future debts be prevented by a change in 
the method of making appropriations? As the legacies are so uncer- 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 1(55 

taiu and the gifts of the living the only thing to be definitely relied 
upon, would it not be well to defer appropriating and spending legacies 
until the year after they have been received, and when of course the amount 
is known. This would not be as helpful as the ideal plan of the " pledge 
in advance from all the churches " referred to in the latter part of the 
paper, but it would be in a measure approaching it, as the committee 
would not be "laying out the year's work over an absolutely empty 
treasury." We know the difficulty that would come the first year and it 
might take two or even three years before the principle could be fully 
worked out, but in that time the end certainly could be reached. 

(a.) "We believe such a plan would commend itself to the business 
judgment of our churches. There would always be in hand a little 
working fund to meet promptly every liability. Why should not our 
missionary societies be conducted on the same rules that prevail in 
ordinary business ? Could any business of nearly half a million a year, 
soon to be a million, be conducted on nothing? Ought we to conduct 
large missionary operations through panics and financial storms and 
years of depression on any such basis ? Resolutions passed at mass 
meetings and national councils are poor things to "bank upon." We 
need in this emergency not only the small gifts of the many, but the 
great gifts of those who have great wealth. To obtain these we shall 
need to inspire them with great confidence in our business methods. 

(b) It would save the necessity of the constant appeal for money to 
save the Society from disaster, and allow the appeal to be made on the 
larger plane for Christ 's sake and the country' 's need. Raising money 
to pay debts has about as much enthusiasm in it, as paying last year's 
bills ? We think there is a feeling in some minds that it is well to work 
up nearly to the danger line of a possible debt as a means of pressure 
on business men to give. We believe it a most erroneous idea. Peo- 
ple are too intelligent to be reached many times from such motives. 
They may be once or twice in an emergency, but the society that plans 
in that way is doomed in the end to bitter disappointment. The cry of 
" Wolf " loses its terror. There are so many causes to which one can 
give, that business men say, and properly too, we will give our money 
where there is better management. We have known of large sums of 
money withheld for this reason. 

(c) It would save an untold amount of mental strain and anxiety 
upon executive officers at home, and men in tbe field, so that all could 
give their best thoughts to the work with that enthusiasm which comes 
from conscious strength and support, unhampered by business burdens. 
We believe men without such anxious loads would be able to do a quar- 
ter more work and do it better. The plan would be in a series of years 
almost like adding an equivalent of 300 or 400 men to the force at the 
front. Furthermore, we need the very best men for home missionary 



166 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

service. Would not prompt payment always, secure more of this class 
and give to the superintendents a choice from a larger number of can- 
didates ? (2) While we may by the change proposed make the adminis- 
tration of what is already given, easier, it does not touch the deeper 
question of "How shall the income of the Society be made commensu- 
rate toith its work ? n It is hardly necessary to repeat here the fact 
which is so familiar, that the country and the church are increasing in 
wealth in a far greater ratio, than the gifts to missionary objects. When 
the former spends $600,000,000 a year for tobacco and $5,500,000 for 
missions, something is wrong. When Christians give only one-sixteenth 
of one percent, of their means for missionary work, something is wrong. 
When the surplus accumulation of wea 7 th of Christians in America, after 
paying all expenses is $400,000,000 per year, and we give $5,500,000 for 
missions and pocket the other $394,500,000, it looks very much like 
robbing God by stealing trust funds. Too many Christians are enor- 
mously rich. Their great wealth in which they glory ought to be their 
shame. It is very evident that not only are there great multitudes who 
give little or nothing, but there are very few who are doing all they 
ought. The great danger to the church now is not skepticism but 
worldliness. The ambition to be hastily rich has become a passion and 
is weakening the power of the church for good. The one pressing need 
of to-day is a revival in giving. The world is everywhere open, there 
are men enough ready to be sent whenever the needed money is laid 
upon God's altar. 

Will you allow me by way of parenthesis to show by a single illus- 
tration how broad this question is. If the church should show by its 
enthusiasm in generous giving that it was thoroughly in earnest to save 
the land, what an influence it would exert on wealth not always in Chris- 
tian hands to do other needed service. Much attention has been prop- 
erly given the last few years to the needs of the cities. The rapid 
massing of men at great centers creates one of the problems of our 
generation. I hope it is not an improper play upon words, to say that 
before the American Home Missionary Society can permanently reach 
some American homes, these homes will have to be of a different kind. 
We must have better homes in our cities for the poor. When six or 
eight people are huddled together in a single cellar or attic, they will 
need more decent surroundings in order to have conversions that will 
be lasting. If the Church were doing its part for the missionaries and 
providing places of worship it might have some hope that other capital 
would provide the necessary home accommodations. Greater benevo- 
lence in the church, inspiring greater benevolence in the world, would 
help also to break down the class distinction between rich and poor, 
and help in solving some of the most serious problems which threaten 
us. When a rich man uses his great wealth like Peter Cooper, he 
creates no barrier between himself and the poor — he removes it. 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 167 

It is wealth hoarded or spent selfishly which causes the poor man 

to chafe and become defiant and dangerous. So long as Christians are 

faithless we are debarred from any positive influence in this direction. 

The whole question in its reach is one of patriotism and country and 

iral safety, as well as of God and humanity. 

3. We come to the practical question, how "that which ought to be' 1 
may come to pass. If there were time we would like to emphasize the 
duty of traii ling the children. A recent State Sunday-school report 
gives these figures. Number of Sunday-schools 225, of which only 120 
take any benevolent contributions. But passing by the whole subject of 
the duty of teaching the children so that they may be the certain givers 
in the near future, and considering only what can be done to effect im- 
mediate results, we would suggest, (1) That business men have not only 
a great responsibility but a great opportunity. In this critical hour in 
our national history, when the one great pressing need is money to 
carry on our missionary work, ought not many men seriously, in the sight 
of God, to consider the question whether the time has not fully come 
for them to cease all further accumulation of property and give their 
income in future to the Lord's work. A few such examples would be 
contagious ; others would increase their gifts, and the old spirit of self- 
sacrifice would again fill the land. What would we say of a minister, 
who has the gift and opportunity to preach, who should close his 
mouth, be silent, and allow the multitude to perish? Is it not just as 
much a breach of trust for a layman with means to fail to use them for 
God ? In the one case as in the other, men are lost who might be 
saved. If God has written of the one, " His blood will I require at the 
watchman's hands," how about the other? Christian business men, 
now is our opportunity to put in work that will tell for God. It costs 
on an average only about $500 to pay a Home Missionary's grant for a 
year. Are there not multitudes who might, in addition to what they 
have been doing in the past, send word to the Treasurer of the Society, 
'■Put one, two, three, five, ten men into the field for me"? They will 
be the " doubles' 1 that will never "undo them" either in this world or 
in the world to come. Would it not sanctify the counting-room and 
the shop, would it not lift them above the dead level around to know 
that out on the frontier somewhere our representatives were preaching 
the "unsearchable riches of Christ"? Dr. Taylor told us, in this room 
last year, how much better he enjoyed his winter home when the wind 
was howling without, at the remembrance of what he had so well done 
to house so many brave men and women. Let us have similar enjoy- 
ment because we have our men out on that front picket line. In the 
consecration of such a large number of young men to missionary work 
as has recently been reported from our seminaries, may we not reason- 
ably expect a new spirit of giving from business men? In God's prov- 
idence is not one to match the other? This whole matter of Christian 



1^8 THE HOME MISSIONARY. AugUst r 

benevolence needs to be lifted to a higher plane and men who have 
wealth made to feel the responsibility of the trust. 

Would it not help to this end if we made the act of giving in the 
Lord's house a more sacred part of our worship ? No one can have 
failed to notice, in God's instructions to his ancient people, what 
a large place was given to their consecrated gifts to him. The methods 
may have changed, but the principle remains. We read in the days of 
Jehoiada the priest, that he "took a chest and bored a hole in the lid of 
it, and set it beside the altar, on the right side as one cometh into the 
house of the Lord ; and the priests that kept the door put therein all 
the money that was brought into the house of the Lord." Compare 
this with the modern waj r in most of our churches, where the boxes are 
carelessly tumbled into the front seat, or laid upon the pulpit steps. If 
the pastor, before the offering was made, should stand in his desk and 
repeat some appropriate passage, and offer a simple prayer at the close, 
m some cases possibly receiving the offering from the hands of the 
ushers, placing it reverently upon the table, would it not give the act 
new dignity and new meaning? However we may accomplish it, we 
need to keep steadily in mind that our money is the Lord's and not 
ours, and he will demand an exact account at the Great Assize before 
he tells us whether or not the business of life for us has been a profit 
or a loss. Christ asked, when on earth, ' ; What shall it profit a man if 
he gain the whole world and lose himself" ? In the other world may 
he not ask another question in profit and loss, What shall it profit a 
man if he gain the whole world and lose not himself only, but a hun- 
dred others he might have saved? (2) Turning from the business man's 
duty to that of the ministry, we would ask if, at the very start, the time 
has not fully come for our theological seminaries to provide some 
definite education to the young men upon our various missionary in- 
terests. If need be, would not a little less knowledge of books and of 
the best way to write a sermon be wisely exchanged for some more 
comprehensive knowledge of the field and the work to which they are 
called? May not this lack of instruction here be an explanation in part 
for the necessity of the hint given in the paper which we think is most 
timely, viz., that the blame for neglect in many of our churches rests 
largely with our pastors. In the criticism which we feel constrained 
to make, we hope it will be fully understood that it does not by any 
means rest in any degree upon most of our pastors. They are doing 
grandly, many of them all they can, often toiling in very stony places. 
If such men only had one or two influential laymen to help them ! 
But there is a class upon whom the criticism must rest. Unfortunately 
they are rarely seen at missionary meetings. It is to pastors that the 
local church is to look for leadership, and if they are careless or indif- 
ferent the church can hardly be expected to be very forward in their 
generosity. Churches are asleep because either the pastor has gone to 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 169* 

sleep or never was awake. Any pastor can arouse and kindle the spirit 
of benevolence, even to sacrifice antl self-denial, if lie is willing to set 
the example. In many parishes the people are entirely ignorant of our 
missionary work. The figures show that only about one-fourth of our 
church- members take the Congregational papers or periodicals. How 
then are the three-fourths to be educated in missionary work ? Not 
certainly from the daily press or the secular monthly. Their informa- 
tion must come from the pulpit if they are ever to be delivered from 
their ignorance. We fear there are some ministers who, for selfish rea- 
sons do not wish their people to become too greatly absorbed in mis- 
sionary interests. A young minister, when he commenced with his 
parish, at once planned with intense energy to develop its benevolence. 
An older minister, in a neighboring church, came to him and said T 
"You are young yet; if you keep on this way they will not be able to 
pay your salary." He replied, " I propose to keep on nevertheless, 
and when they cannot pay me I will move on." What is the sequel? 
That church has grown strong, its pastor is now filling one of the most 
influential positions in Massachusetts, and the older man, who was so 
much wiser, has seen his church first " shirk" and then " shrivel." We 
fear this example stands for a class. Will they never believe the prov- 
erb, " There is that scattereth and yet increaseth, and there is that, 
withholdeth more than is meet, and it tendeth to poverty ?" We believe 
men are ready to give when rightly informed. A person comes before 
a people with some special appeal, giving facts, and there is usually 
money enough. How does Mr. Moody have such success in raising 
large sums of money ? Because he always makes every man see and 
feel that the money he gives him will be wisely invested for good and 
without waste. People have such confidence in him that they give 
generously. Let our pastors give the facts relating to our missionary 
work, the awful need, the glorious openings, the hopefulness, the sure 
returns for every dollar invested ; and then, with all their souls, plead 
that God and humanity and patriotism demand their interest, and 
pocket-books will be opened and streams of money will flow into the 
Lord's treasury. 

And there is no excuse whatever for any pastor not doing this. 
With all the missionary literature that is furnished so freely by our vai-i- 
ous societies, with the facts which fill our religious papers, there is 
material in abundance. We fear too much of this literature is treated 
like an advertisement for a new clothes- wringer, and put into the waste- 
basket without reading. It is a shame thus to treat it. If it were a no- 
tice about some railroad stock in which they owned a share, it would be 
carefully read. Has not the Lord's missionary work an equal right to be 
treated respectfully? Let every pastor purchase a scrap book, and ar- 
range it in sections for each of our seven societies, and collect material 
as it is published. Then let him preach at least once in three months a 



170 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

missionary sermon. It will do his own soul good, and the people are 
bound to respond to his appeal. It might be doubted whether a minis- 
ter should be licensed who would not preach four missionary sermons a 
year. He ought certainly to have sufficient interest in the command to 
" Go into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature," to take 
a broad look at the Lord's field, and present it to his people once in 
three months. 

Too many ministers seem to regard the Sunday when the representa- 
tive of the benevolent society comes, as the day for them to go away 
and preach for themselves on their own account; or plan to work him 
into the summer months, when the people are scattered and cannot be 
instructed, but when the minister can get an extra Sunday for a vaca- 
tion. It is surprising to know the number of cases of this kind that are 
constantly occurring, showing the lack of a nice sense of honor. What 
do you say, when a minister threatens if you will not come and present 
the cause of your Society to his people — suggesting at the same time 
that you occupy the pulpit all day — that he will not have the usual col- 
lection taken for your Society ? The case made still stronger when four 
times within five years the Society has sent a representative to that 
parish. What value do you place upon that minister's interest in your 
missionary work ? This incident is not an imaginary one ; it is history. 

There is a special reason why pastors should habitually do the work 
themselves. In many of our churches the weekly offering system has 
become firmly established. We believe in it, because it is Scriptural, 
definite, systematic, and capable of becoming universal. But there is a 
danger in this direction. When collections were taken for some specific 
object, on a given Sabbath, it was the custom for the pastor, or some 
one interested, to emphasize the need and give some facts. On the 
weekly offering and percentage plan, there is danger that it may become 
a piece of machinery without any heart. Education regularly and con- 
stantly given from the pulpit can alone prevent this. 

Passing from the duty of the business man and the ministry, we 
come (3) to the necessity of better denominational organization. It 
seems to us that the suggestion of the paper to have this whole matter 
discussed in the local conferences all over our land, looking toward the 
perfecting of some system by which each church, even the feeblest and 
most obscure, should have some part in missionary giving, is worthy of 
our approval. There is an old maxim to " Divide and Conquer." We 
believe it is by just such a division of the whole field into districts, in 
this way, that we may arouse the dead and listless churches, and through 
their added help do far more than in the past to conquer this land for 
Christ. We believe the wisest end would be most quickly attained, if 
there should be a united effort of all our various missionary interests. 
It is one world lost in sin which we are trying to redeem for one Master. 
Each of our seven societies has its own special work, which cannot be 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 171 

neglected without injuring all the rest. There would be power in a 
united effort which could not be felt in any other way. Men who are 
especially interested in some special field would be included in the grand 
whole. None would be excused. Such a union of interest would be an 
object lesson to the world which would be of inestimable value. We 
would, therefore, recommend to the Executive Committee of the Society 
the calling of a conference, either of all the Executive Boards of our 
seven societies, or of delegates from each, to meet in the autumn to con- 
sider this whole matter. The time has come to organize more thor- 
oughly. ''The children of this world are in their generation wiser than 
the children of light." May we not learn a lesson from our political 
parties'? There is a National Central Committee, then a State and 
County Committee, till, in its last aualysis, we have the Ward and the 
Street Canvass. No plan will work itself. But we would suggest 
whether the time has not come for our seven societies in conference to 
select a Central Committee, of five or seven men, to give the matter di- 
rection. Let them be chosen for service, and not for ornament, taking 
men, if possible, not now connected with any of our missionary Boards. 
It shall be their duty to secure three men in each State, who, in turn, 
shall secure one man in every conference or county,, to see that the local 
churches are not left to be careless or indifferent as to the needs of the 
great world without. Let it be their duty to see that every church in 
our fellowship remembers each of our seven societies every year. No 
matter how small the gift, if but ten cents, let them have some definite 
connection with our whole field. The little churches half dead among 
the hills need it for their own sakes as well as Christ's. We want, as 
churches, to be " all at it, and always at it." 

As the great need of the hour is a revival of benevolence, Secretary 
Clark's paper will have performed a worthy mission, if it shall awaken a 
discussion on this theme in every conference, association and church 
throughout the land. 

This is the second paper on this subject from his pen. We hope he 
will continue, with the same spirit and in the same words which William 
Lloyd Garrison used when he commenced the publication of The Lib- 
erator: "I am in earnest; I will not equivocate; I will not excuse; I 
will not retreat a single inch, and I will be heard!" 

Samuel B. Capen, 
J. G. Haskell. 



REPORT OF (COMMITTEE ON SEC. BARROWS'S PAPER. 

PRESENTED BY ITS CHAIRMAN, REV. J. G. MERRILL, D.D., OF ST. LOUIS. 

A man in this year of grace who would do home missionary thinking, 
must be capable of the broadest thinking. The day of provincialism in 
home missionary undertakings ended with the Albany Convention. The 



172 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August,. 

day of metropolitan thought ceased with the first Saratoga meeting 
the awakening of our Society to the exigencies of our incoming immi- 
grant population has made our work cosmopolitan. 

A Secretary of the Home Missionary Society of any day needs a 
broader sweep of vision than the premier of our republic. The interests 
committed to his keeping involve the destiny of not merely our nation 
and all nations, but that infinitely more vast commonwealth, the King- 
dom of God on earth and in Heaven. 

The paper assigned to your committee for review, to a large degree 
appreciates the problem given to our churches to solve. Prepared by 
one who began work as a Home Missionary in a church with less than a 
score of members ; who for years held one of the most difficult and deli- 
cate of our Society's outposts ; who to-day finds forced upon him ques- 
tions the equal of which in their vastness and varied difficulties none of 
his predecessors met, it would have been an unspeakable disappointment 
indeed had it been in any respect less far-reaching, less inspiriting, than 
it is. 

Quite naturally, a review of this report, although reflecting the opin- 
ions of the entire committee to whom it was intrusted, bears the marks 
of one whose ministerial life has been in the heart of our missionary 
operations, and has been shaped by his own experiences as a missionary, 
a State Superintendent, and a pastor in one of the centers of the field of 
conflict. 

Up to the full limit of our ability, we men of the West think along 
the lines which this on glorious Society is working. With the spirit of the 
region in which we live, our thinking is positive, and expressed with 
freedom ; while, with pardonable satisfaction, do we rejoice in the adop- 
tion of measures which the exigencies of the question before us have 
forced us to adopt, advocate, and sometimes urge. 

There are societies which carry on their affairs after the methods of 
Mr. Dickens's famous firm, Spenlow & Jorkins, whose Mr. Spenlow was 
always so reacty to grant any suggestions asked, but whose inexorable 
silent partner in the back part of the store would never, never give his 
consent. Some of us in the West think that we can remember the time 
when the Secretaries at New York had such a silent partner ; he went by 
the name of " rules of the Society" — and it did sometimes astonish us 
that brave and progressive as they were, the active members of the firm 
stood in such awe of this inflexible, hard-hearted character. I am glad 
to have heard the well-authenticated rumor that Mr. Jorkins is dead ; 
that the Society has learned that it is something greater than the rules 
that it has made to govern its action, and that rules must change with 
the problems to be solved ; that it is not wise to work an example in 
multiplication by the rule we have learned thoroughly and used faith- 
fully when in addition; that a whip that would increase tbe speed of a 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 173 

stage-coach is not the appliance that will secure sixty miles an hour out 
of a locomotive. 

Our report starts out with a valuable comparison of the workings of 
our Society and the relations which exist between the United States of 
America and the various States and Territories of our Union. There are 
those upon this floor who, as members of the Oberlin Council of '71, will 
recall the vigorous contest which secured to the Territories, as our re- 
port calls them, the local governments which this paper of our Secretary 
declares is now insisted upon in all regions where the churches cannot 
as yet furnish the means to carry on adequately their own work. 

And, in this connection, none too appreciative is the approval given 
in the report of the action of the Executive Boards in these aided States. 
The men constituting these boards bear constantly in mind the sacred- 
ness of the funds given them to distribute — the gifts of the Lord's poor, 
the widows' mites which our Master has afforded eternal honor. They 
also feel as few others can the meagerness of the moneys at their oom- 
mand in comparison with ttie needs of the work intrusted to them. 
The days of prayerful deliberation when is decided how most econom- 
ically and wisely the apportionment made to the State can be used, call 
into requisition not merely all the financial ability that can be sum- 
moned, but also the power to forecast the future of rapidly growing 
commonwealths, the courage to refuse grants which a wise administra- 
tion of funds must deny even the most pious and importunate of beg- 
gars, and even at times the heroic treatment, which puts out of exist- 
ence churches that have finished their work, and have no other mission 
before them than " by their death to glorify God." 

The generous, self-sacrificing givers of the East, honored by our 
Master to be the benefactors of our growing and needy West, can rest 
assured that the almoners of their gifts are, up to the full limit of their 
ability, securing the largest possible returns ; they are not satisfied with the 
three per cent, of the Government bonds ; nor the ten per cent, of "Western 
farm mortgages ; nor the two or three per cent per month of the fron- 
tier bankers ; they are looking for the thirty, sixty, yes, one hundred-fold 
demanded in the financial policy of the Kingdom of Heaven. They put 
out your money with the usury that our Lord commends. 

A second point in the paper of our Secretary which we would notice 
with most hearty appreciation is the proposed use of the $50,000 Swett 
Exigency Fund, as collateral for borrowing money that the missionaries 
may be paid promptly. Mr. Jorkins surely is dead. The nquisition lis 
a thing of the past. No longer will the Society insist upon the mission- 
ary's naming his minimum salary, the State committees cutting this 
down if possible, and then, when due, telling the man who has earned 
his money, " We have promised money that we did not have, allow us to 
display your necessities up and down our church aisles that the hearts 



174 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

of the charitable may pity you and come to your relief." Done with a 
policy that made beggars of the truest men who ever earned their 
meager salaries ! Shame upon the churches that needed such a specta- 
cle to unloose their purse-strings. Honor be to the wisdom that has 
devised a method by which money can be secured without paying the 
per cents of the frontier or ruining the reputation of a missionary. 
Rather may we be able to say, Honor to the churches that find in the 
needs of the work and its opportunities all the arguments wanted to 
raise the money to carry it on. 

If the exigencies of the closing year had secured no other benefit 
than this, it is enough to be devoutly thankful for, that hereafter there 
shall not be added to the trials of our men at the front the heartaches, 
mortification and physical suffering caused by difficult payment of money 
twice earned. 

To be sure the money to be hypothecated is not to-day in the hands 
of the Society. It has already gone on its beneficent mission. But it 
is to be returned. The constituency of our Society will never allow the 
funds to be wanting to pay an honest debt. The claims of the Swett 
Fund no one can question the validity of. Once replaced may it ever 
be the pledge of uninterrupted financial honor in our dealings with our 
men. 

The old faith in the churches and in the God of the churches for 
the forthcoming of funds to do the work which Providence had opened 
seemed Christian and hence to be held in honor. But experience hav- 
ing shown that this so-called faith worked extreme hardship to those 
who least deserved it, it certainly appears to be no distrust of Provi- 
dence to avert like disaster in the future by means of the rich legacy 
which God has put into our hands. 

The temper of our age is not that of twenty-five years ago. Our 
salaries as ministers we are not willing to receive save as an equivalent 
for services rendered. Donation parties belong to a past that ought 
never to return. The nerve of Home Missions does not secure its vital 
fluid from the tears of starving children. The vigor of business life is 
in our churches and missionary organizations. The Home Missionary is 
simply and solely the most essential factor in the problem we are solv- 
ing. He should command, not beg ; should, on the day it is due, receive 
the money due him. 

We shall never outgrow the merciful command, " In his day thou 
shalt give him his hire, neither shall the sun go down upon it," etc. 
We can afford to forego the glory of having a Congregational church 
in every hamlet of America, bat we cannot forego the privilege of being 
true to every man in our employ. 

Another important point made in the paper of your Secretary is con- 
cerning evangelists. This is another of the new departures of the 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 175 

Society. It seems to us of the West an exceedingly wise movement. 
Your committee would suggest that the men and work designated would 
be better called " general missionary.'' That there are dangers in this 
style of work we do not fail to recognize. Men whose stock in trade is 
a limp-backed Bible, some Gospel Hymns, and a set of methods of the 
stool-pigeon order, are doing incalculable harm in making impossible 
genuine Christian work; but there are wise, earnest, devout men, with 
the ability to lead their fellows to decision for Christ, who know how to 
supplement without overthrowing a pastor's work, and in the wake of 
whose movements can be found churches strengthened numerically, 
financially, and in spiritual life. There are communities which are so 
completely asphyxiated that nothing short of such a cyclonic movement 
as evangelists produce can stir them. After such an awakening, and 
not until then, are the labors of an ordinary pastor of worth. 

The methods of other denominations also force this form of labor 
upon us, and provided the management of our State organizations 
crucify the denominational, I should say sectarian, passion for mere 
numbejs, insist upon knowledge to accompany zeal, select less than one 
in ten of those who will seek the positions, the Gideon s Band, which 
will come out of this faithful elimination, will be mighty to the pulling 
down of strongholds. This is an agency, not unlike electricity, as full 
of possibility for evil as it is magnificent in its possibilities for good. 

But the most important department of Secretary Barrows's paper we 
have not touched. His discussion of the question of the immigrant 
population. Other matters in the annual report relating to the ordinary 
workings of the Society, although of vastest import we must pass by to 
consider this method. Circumstances have compelled the chairman of 
your committee to consider most anxiously the work among our Ger- 
man friends. Who could labor ten years in the midst of a city one-half 
of which was composed of thrifty, industrious people not one of whom 
was influenced by the gospel preached year after year ! They are born, 
marry and die. They employ the physician, the justice of the peace and 
the undertaker. The priest they despise. They sell you their wares, 
they support the public schools. One thing they have no use for — the 
church. They make no boasts, they appear to form no plans, but none 
the less do they enter a county, and, little by little, do they take possession 
of it. The little church at the four corners grows less and less as the 
American families, one by one, sell their farms, and the patrons of the 
beer garden purchase them ; sometimes even the sanctuary is changed 
into a saloon. The towns, as a natural result, have German tradesmen, 
the couuty officers are held by the men from over the sea. This were 
all well enough, for we would not have to go very far back to find that 
we all also came from over the sea, if only added to their many super- 
lative excellencies these immigrants could be possessed of true Christian 
principle. 



17G THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

And it is this which the Home Missionary Society, above all other 
agencies, has been raised up to afford. Our civil government can do 
nothing in this direction, our public schools are impotent here, our 
mercantile agencies are futile. Society is useless ; the church, in many 
instances urged upon them and largely supported for them, is their only 
salvation. 

The report of our Secretary estimates the incoming flood of immi- 
grants for 1887 at 800,000. More than two whole regiments for each 
day of the year. Enough to make two hundred western cities. More 
in number than the population of the city of Chicago, more in number 
than the inhabitants of several of oar great commonwealths. 

The Atlantic Ocean is the crowded highway over which, at a nominal 
cost, are transported every week fifteen thousand people, seeking for 
money, lands, freedom. Very few of them bring a vital religion capable 
of being acclimated here ; none of them save the Mormons have the 
spirit of devotion to a cause. 

The forces that have brought them hither are unrest, the solicitation 
of competing lines of travel, the Eldorado which ever lies toward the 
setting sun. Hurried through Castle Garden, whirled forward on spe- 
cial trains via rival trunk lines, they are apparently soon lost in our great 
centers and on our broad prairies, but none the less do they add to the 
ranks of Mammon, some of them to the strength of socialism, many of 
them to the foes of temperance, not a few to the number of the adher- 
ents of the superstition and ignorance of a foreign hierarchy. And all 
the while our churches as a whole are asleep, the stupor of despair, the 
blindness of indifference making us content to hold our own, to save our 
kith and kin. 

It is an open secret that the indifference of leading pastors of our 
large western cities broke the courage of the man who has left his post 
as superintendent of our German work to become a missionary in Japan. 
This most disheartening event of the year, the sailing next week of a man 
of more value to us in his department than a whole class from a theolog- 
ical seminary, is in many aspects of the case appalling. As many of us 
look at the matter, no anxiety to secure men for the foreign work should 
have allowed him, however anxious to enter upon it, to have gone from 
an important post now abandoned. We console ourselves somewhat by 
the thought that when shall have gone on unarrested the movement that 
is taking place in our Mississippi Valley, when county after county and 
town after town shall have lost its churches and its Christianity, some of 
the young men from Japan converted by our brother, hearing of the 
beathenism of this, thegardtn of America, fired by missionary zeal will 
set sail for our shores, and thus the need, which with weeping we to day 
are sowing, will in another generation bring forth precious fruit. 

And this is no idle dreaming. Unless we awake, not one county nor 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 177 

one city, but vast regions of our domains are to fall into the bands of 
tbose wbo will bave nothing to do with the God of our fathers or the 
Church of our Lord Jesus Christ. 

What matters it that these men bring us a splendid physique, strong 
intellects, wealth? If with all these true religion is wanting, the fate of 
our republic is sealed. 

Their materialistic methods of living bewitch our children, their suc- 
cess in money-making dazzles them. Nothing but a church aroused to 
self-denying giving, wisest and most prompt action, can save us. 

The cause is not lost. As more than one of our speakers last night 
said, our menace is our inspiration. The Church is to arise and shine, 
the dark clouds will not always hide it. 

Seven years ago this summer I climbed the leafy summit of Gray's 
Peak, 1-1,500 feet above the level of the sea. Panting in the thm ah' I 
surveyed the magnificent horizon. Far away over the mountain tops I 
caught the brilliant gleam of the wondrous Mountain of the Holy Cross. 
But up the side of the elevation upon which I stood stole a dark cloud, 
the chill of a mountain storm seized me. I could see no further than if 
I were in a dungeon, and yet I knew that beneath that bright southern 
sun beyond the little cloud that blinded me, the cross was still shining in 
all its splendor. And to-day I know that the Church of Christ in our 
beloved land can not, will not fail; the incoming clouds cover our view 
point for a moment, but the Sun of Righteousness never has a setting. 

James G. Merrill, 
Michael Burnham. 



ADDRESS OF REV. JOSHUA COIT, 

SECRETARY OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

The Auxiliary in Massachusetts comes to this annual assembly of the 
saints, in full force and with cordial greeting to her young mother. 

About to hold her own eighty-eighth annual meeting, she is glad of 
the inspiration and cheer which comes from this gathering ; glad to see 
and learn to know the brethren from the front, and to give with others 
a hearty tribute to the noble men and women who, at the cost of so 
great and so little appreciated sacrifice, are doing for us such grand 
work. The churches send picked men and women — of their very best — 
to do the work the Master bids. " Go ye into all the world, and preach 
the gospel to every creature" — so runs the command. That command 
is the Constitution of every Missionary Society, Home and Foreign. In 
obedience to it, saintly men and women are in " all the world" under the 
banner of the Cross. In foreign lands, among the heathen everywhere, 
the standard of the Cross is being lifted up. and glorious conquests are 



178 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August,. 

made. In equally full obedience, no less saintly men and women are 
pushing out under the same banner over our own land, which is as much 
a part of "all the world" as is Japan — and a part, too, for which we not 
only have and feel a greater responsibility than for Japan, but also a re- 
sponsibility that we cannot divide with any or all other Christian nations. 

Massachusetts is glad to meet a few of these men and womer, and 
through them honor all. It is but a few weeks since a foreign mission- 
ary in our office in Boston, who came in to express her interest in our 
work in the West, declared with much earnestness that she had not 
grace enough to be a Home Missionary. She knew, too, what she was 
talking about. Herself a foreign missionary, and her mother a Home 
Missionary, she insisted that her own hardships and self-denials were as 
nothing compared with her mother's ; and I think she was right. "Well, 
we will honor both and all, and rejoice that so many are willing to go 
forth and endure hardships. 

Of the work in Massachusetts this is to be said : It is growing on 
our hands. Strictly home missionary work is increasing in the Old Bay 
State. One-third of the receipts of the National Society came from our 
State this year, and so long as we keep this proportion good, we feel 
justified in spending as we did last year some $40,000 in our home work. 
Thirteen thousand dollars of this was for work among our foreign popu- 
lation and in our new city work. The number of churches and missions 
helped reached an even hundred. The eighty-seven churches have a 
total membership of 4,501, an average membership of fifty-two. Resi- 
dent membership is but 3,561, an average of forty-one. Now the addi- 
tions by profession of faith were 389, or ten and six-tenths per cent., 
while the additions by profession to the rest of the churches in Massa- 
chusetts last year was but four and eight-tenths per cent, of then- resi- 
dent membership. One hundred and fifty- six of the 389 were additions 
to our five French churches, of which Rev. Mr. Amaron will speak. 

Of the four or five divisions of our work, I have time to speak only 
of one. The foreign work reaches French, Canadians, Germans, Swedes 
and Norwegians. 

The work of our General Missionaries, Rev. Lemuel Jones and Mr. 
R. M. Taft, is of great and increasing value. 

The new work in cities we have but just commenced. The grants to 
new enterprises in or near cities and large towns are proving themselves 
wise investments. But passing all these, I can speak only of the help 
extended to churches in country towns. Much has been said during the 
year in the public prints about the decline of religion and the deteriora- 
tion of morals in the country towns of New England. Instances are 
given and dilated upon of deserted churches on the hill-tops, and of 
flagrant crime in retired places. But so far as Massachusetts is con- 
cerned, certain facts are known which go far toward showing that relig- 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 179 

ion has riot declined, nor have morals deteriorated. For if the sad state 
of things alleged is true of any towns in Massachusetts, we should find 
it in the towns where our churches were so feeble as to need help from 
this Society. Now, there are thirty-three towns where our churches 
have been helped for from ten to forty years, and in these towns the 
church-membership has so gained upon the population that there is to- 
day one church-member to every nine and one-half of the population 
whereas forty years ago there was only one church- member to every 
eighteen and three-fifths of the population. The population of these 
thirty-three towns has decreased in forty years from 30.449 to 22,165, 
but the church-membership has increased from 1,681 to 2,328 — an in- 
creasing church in the face of a decreasing population — the population 
falling off twenty-seven per cent., and the church gaining twenty-seven 
per cent. 

Now any study of church records will convince one that tha average 
church-member stands higher in character to-day than forty years ago. 
And any one familiar with the facts will admit that church life is 
stronger in its power for good over the community now than then. 
Much that is said of the alleged religious decline may fairly be attributed 
to insufficient recognition of the changes that have taken place in the 
persous that make up the population of these country towns and in the 
location of population centers. The wave of immigration has reached 
the hill towns, and the villages have moved down from the hills to the 
valleys and cluster now around the railroad station and the mill. There 
are not so many people to the hundred who may be expected to go to 
the Protestant church worship, and often the new meeting-house in the 
valley or perhaps the two new places of worship account satisfactorily 
for the desertion of the old meeting-house on the hill. For it should be 
noticed that the comparisons unfavorable to the present condition of 
things generally refer back to a boyhood forty or fifty years ago. Actu- 
ally the days of the stage-coach are longed for by some of these dis- 
tressed ones who mourn our Zion. 

During the years that have passed since the hill-top churches were 
thronged with worshipers, or more correctly, with attendants during 
divine worship there have been many changes that should be borne in 
mind in all discussion of this subject. 

There is a general change in city and in country in regard to attend- 
ance upon public worship. It is no longer true that a man who habitu- 
ally neglects public worship on the Lord's Day is regarded with suspi- 
cion so that before the community will accept him as a thoroughly re- 
spectable man this fact must be satisfactorily accounted for. Whether 
the loss of this compulsory attendance is, in the broad view, to be de- 
plored or not is a question, but the fact should be recognized in all our 
counting of congregations for comparison now and forty years ago. 



180 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

Again, however much we may lament the forming of many churches 
of many minds, there have been many formed in these counti-y towns, so 
that to-day we have two or three in the town where there used to be but 
that one to which every respectable person went regularly; and there are 
fewer persons in the town for the two or three ; some of them are Eo- 
manists, and any of them can stay at home or walk abroad and not attend 
public worship without losing social caste. 

This evil of many churches, of more churches than the numerical 
demand calls for, has, it should be remembered, some compensating ad- 
vantages. Indeed, it has not yet been proved true in ecclesiastical mat- 
ters if it has in manufacturing and mercantile affairs, that one large es- 
tablishment is more economical and therefore, in the eye of the dismal 
science, better than many small ones. The synagogues in our Savior's 
day were small. The churches in the apostles' time, patterned to some 
extent, we may assume, after the synagogue, were so small that 
Nymphas had one in his house and Philemon another in his, and Aquila 
and Priscilla one in theirs. In spite of the temptation to strife and petty 
jealousy so often yielded to, it is yet good to see two or even three sets 
of people in a place making great sacrifice to maintain in the way they 
conscientiously think the best way the worship and service of God. The 
loss of missionary money occasioned is to be regretted of course, but not 
perhaps to be deplored in such holy horror as it sometimes is by people 
who shut their eyes in calm complacency to the waste by foolish extrava- 
gance of a great deal more money by Christians ; money which, though it 
may not be missionary money, is yet the Lord's money that an honest 
view and practice of stewardship would make to be missionary money. 
In all other business transactions carried on upon a large scale a percent- 
age of loss is reckoned upon and allowed. And it is not to be expected 
that missionary operations, so long as men are human, will prove an ex- 
ception. 

Once more. These country towns have been sending out constantly 
young men and women of their very best to cities, manufacturing towns, 
and to the wide West, where they have proved in many cases bulwarks 
for righteousness. The wonder is, when we think of this long- continued 
draft by emigration that there is anybody left in the old home to go to 
church, rather than that some pews are empty. This emigration fur- 
nishes the sufficient reason why the church that remains is compelled to 
ask of its sister churches who are strong, some of them, from this very 
source, aid in maintaining public worship And as they ask they may 
well say, not only that they are weak, but that they are weak because of 
strength both spiritual and financial taken from them to build up other 
churches far and wide through the land. And they may add that the 
young people who are now going and are to go in all the future from the 
communities where they are set for the maintenance of truth, will be a 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 181 

mighty power for good or for evil up and down our land. As they'plead 
that the old church be maintained they may well ask, Whose business is it 
after all? Upon whom does the responsibility for its maintenance rest? 
These streams from the country-side unite with the tide of immigration to 
make the river of trade and of professional life that flows through our 
cities and over the western country. In the past then, waters from the 
hills, sweet and pure, have been the greater in bulk, but now the pro- 
portion is changed. There is need, plainly, for the utmost diligence 
that every right effort be made that these waters be pure and life-giving. 
This the}" caunot be except they flow from under the threshold of the 
Lord's house. 

The number of churches helped in our country towns^has been now 
for some years steadily increasing, and there is no indication that the 
maximum has been reached. There is a feeling in some of the giving 
churches that too large amounts are spent in the State. This not so 
much because of unwillingness to allow weight to such considerations in 
favor of helping the weaker churches as have just been advanced, as 
from a deep sense of the wide work at the West, coupled with the belief 
that there is on the part of churches helped so great withholding of 
what they might pay, as to amount to unrighteousness and the fear that 
by the liberal grants something closely allied to pauperism is encour- 
aged. Any who have this feeling may perhaps be comforted, so far as 
the work in the West is concerned, by noticing the fact that this Society 
received last year from the living, $72,912.25, and sent to New York 
§71,742.09. The difference is but slight. But it is true that in some of 
these country churches there are men and women who'are able to give 
more than they do for the support of the gospel. How shall these de- 
linquents be brought to right action ? There seems to be no better way 
than to preach the gospel to them as well as to unconverted sinners. 
So long as this fails to bring them to do what they ought, what else can 
be done in behalf of the general interests of the church, and the land, and 
the special needs of their community, than to help those that do make 
sacrifices and give all they are able, in maintaining the preaching of the 
Word? And that some of these feeble churches show greater self-de- 
nial in the raising of money for the services of the Lord's house, even 
though they raise but little, than the strong churches in our cities, 
though they spend many thousands, is beyond all question. 

The larger part of our expenditure is for the wider work thafj, rests 
upon us in common with our sister churches all over our land. The 
word " Home Missions," suggests to most people in Massachusetts the 
frontier work in the midst of a thronging crowd of new-comers from all 
quarters of the globe, the most of whom are utterly irreligious, and care 
nothing for the Bible, of which they are absolutely ignorant, and have 
no respect for the church. This phase of home missionary effort is, in 



182 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

some respects, the most striking. There is a great deal of just such 
home missionai'y work needed, and unless it is done, and speedily done, 
there can be no assurance of our prosperity as a nation. The gospel 
alone can save us as a people. It seems plain that God will require, is 
requiring, at the hands of this generation of Christians in this land, unto 
whom he has given the gospel in one hand and abundant means in the 
other, that they put the two hands together so diligently, so effectually, 
that his Word shall be preached in all places throughout the length and 
breadth of the whole country, so that every miner's camp, and cow-boy's 
ranch, and hunter's cabin, and farmer's home, shall be visited by the 
preacher, and all men everywhere have the gospel invitation, not simply 
spoken in their hearing by chance, but urged home upon them week 
after week in the regular services of the Lord's house, and as well in the 
faithful visits of their pastor. How can the church, why should the 
church, be satisfied with anything short of that? 



WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT. 



EXTRACTS FROM THE ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SECRE- 
TARY OF THE WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT. 

It would be impossible to tell how many Woman's Home Mission- 
ary societies have been formed since the opening of the Woman's De- 
partment, in 1883. 

Our sixteen Woman's State Unions number now 779 auxiliaries, an 
increase of 209 within the past year. And there are very many local 
societies, not as yet connected with the State organizations. We trust 
the arguments presented here to-day will influence many of these to 
join the organized ranks, which we report as follows : 

woman's home missionary state unions. Aux. 

Maine. — Woman's Missionary Auxiliary S2 

New Hampshire. — Female Cent Institution 98 

Connecticut. — Woman's Cong. Home Missionary Union 38 

New York. — Woman's Home Missionary Union 72 

Ohio. — Woman's Home Missionary Union „ 66 

Illinois. — Woman's Home Missionary Union 90 

Michigan. — Woman's Home Missionary Society 105 

Wisconsin. — Woman's Home Missionary Union 50 

Minnesota. — Woman's Home Missionary Society 72 

Missouri. — Woman's Home Missionary Society 24 

Nebraska. — Woman's Missionary Association 34 

Kansas. — Woman's Home Missionary Society 45 

Iowa. — Woman's Home Missionary Society 80 

North Dakota. — Woman's Home Missionary Society 6 

South Dakota. — Woman's Home Missionary Union 17 

Wash. Ter. — Woman's Home Missionary Society Not reported. — 

Total 779 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 183 

The reported contributions of ladies' societies throughout the 
country to our branch of home missionary work is $23,192.05. Last 
year it was $12,327.0!). This speaks well for the growth of organization. 
Iowa came into the sisterhood of Woman's State XJi ions in June, 
1886, very shortly after our last anniversary. All the Unions report 
increase of Auxiliaries, and a growing appreciation of the duty and 
privilege of putting forth our woman's arm to help on the great cause 
of the evangelization of our country. 

New York. — This beautiful Empire State reports 14 new Aux- 
iliaries and $611.80 as their aid to our work in the last six months. 
Having changed their time of annual meeting, they report only for six 
months. Their receipts have increased annually about $1,000. Their 
aim for the new year is $1,500. 

Connecticut. — Connecticut reports receipts from her 38 Auxiliaries 
of $2,323.13, and adds, " 1886 being only our second year, we feel that 
we have done quite well, and we are very hopeful for our growth in 
the present year.'' 

Michigan. — Michigan is the "Banner State" as to number of Aux- 
iliaries, also as to increase in number during the past year. She reports 
105, a gain of nearly 100 per cent. No State has done more nobly for 
this cause, in proportion to her ability. No State has a more rapidly 
opening home missionary field. 

Minnesota. — Minnesota is one of our model States in energy, zeal, 
and method in her home missionary work. She reports 72 Auxiliaries, 
with a contribution to our work of $1,215.33 for the past six months. 

Missouri. — Missouri, one of our youngest sisters, has increased her 
Auxiliaries from 10 to 21, and has sent to our treasury $659.91. 

Nebraska. — Nebraska, with 156 churches, of which 117 are aided by 
the American Home Missionary Society, brings to us her woman's offer- 
ing of $721.97. 

Many of the Nebraska churches are making a noble struggle for self- 
support ; and in no other way could they better aid the cause of Home 
Missions, though then- reported contributions are lessened thereby. 

Time forbids further extracts from the reports of our State Auxil- 
iaries. We offer our heart-felt thanks to all for the efficient aid they 
have given to the National Cause, which includes the missionary needs 
of every one of the older States as well as those on the frontier. 

It must always be remembered, too, that many of our most helpful 
societies in the older States still prefer to work for Home Missions in 
their old accustomed way. They do not contribute to the treasury of 
the A. H. M. S. separately from the church collections, but they do a 
great deal for the cause in the way of boxes, barrels, and trunks of sup- 
plies for the home missionary families. The Ladies' Society of the 
Broadway Tabernacle Church, New York, is a notable exa nple of this 



184 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

kind of help. Its paying membership is 92 ; average attendance on its 
weekly meetings, 45. Twenty-five trunks have been sent to missionaries 
during the last year, in each case including a new pulpit suit for the 
minister, a warm shawl for the wife, and twenty new useful books. The 
cash value of the 25 trunks is estimated at $4,434.44. 

PRACTICAL SUGGESTIONS. 

Our practical suggestions must be brief. 

"We propose that the work among the foreign population still hold a 
warm place in your prayers, and have a fair share of your contributions ; 
but we ask our more able societies, especially, to take the support of one 
or more missionaries as the particular object for their contributions this 
year. Already one of our local societies and one State Union have 
adopted this suggestion. Others are now holding it in consideration. 
Any society may select its missionary, or a locality in which it feels a 
special interest. Correspondence may then be maintained between the 
missionary and the ladies' society. 

The average appropriation for one year of missionary labor is about 
$450. This plan, we think, will increase interest, and give defimteness 
to effort. 

THE NEED, THE VALUE, AND THE PRACTICABILITY 

OF THE 

WOMAN'S STATE HOME MISSIONARY UNIONS. 

BY MRS. GEO. M. LANE, OF MICHIGAN. 

The words of the Master, " Without me ye can do nothing," are as 
true in relation to his disciples to-day, as when spoken to the waiting 
twelve, more than eighteen centuries ago. Is not the unspoken promise 
" With me ye can do anything,"' equally true ? It is only because of my 
strong faith in this plainly implied declaration, coupled with the " Lo, I 
am with you alway," that I venture to come and speak to you upon 
this important theme. 

Before anything is said of woman's organizations, let us look for a 
moment at the need for home missionary work. This is a subject so 
vast in extent, so overwhelming in magnitude, so far reaching in conse- 
quences (whether done or neglected), so important from any view, that 
we can do nothing at this time but touch a few salient points. The 
question is not a new one to any of us whro are here, and doubtless you 
are more familiar with it than I am, but we often need to have our minds 
stirred " by way of remembrance." Study it as much as we may, ponder 
it as constantly as we please, we cannot comprehend it all, we cannot 
realize it as a whole. It is only when we think of it in detail that we 
begin to understand the wonderful opportunity God has given to the 
people of this land, in this day. When we look at one phase of the 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY, 18& 

question after another, consider the great extent of our domain, the 
character of the people, the multiplying needs, the imperative calls, and 
the necessity for immediate action, we are constrained to cry out, 
" Who is sufficient for these things ?" 

Regarding the importance and extent of the home missionary field, I 
refer you to an editorial in the Woman's Department of The Home Mis- 
sionary (May, 188G) entitled " Our Country." But even this statement 
we shall have to divide and take by piecemeal before we can compre- 
hend it. This land is not only vast but it is as the land of Canaan, " a 
land of wheat and barley, and vines and fig-trees ; a land whereon thou 
shalt eat bread without scarceness ; thou shalt not lack anything in it ; 
a land whose stones are iron, and out of whose hills thou mayest dig 
brass." " It is a land of hills and valleys, and drinketh water of the rain 
of heaven.'' " A land which the Lord thy God careth for ; the eyes of the 
Lord thy God are always upon it, from the beginning of the year, even 
unto the end of the year. From almost every part of this vast and 
goodly land, there is heard the Macedonian cry, ' Ccme over and help 
us,' and from above, the command, 'By the hand of sons and daughters,' 
' sow this continent for God.' " 

To picture the character .of the people, we need to remember, first,, 
that we have the children of Americans, perhaps of our own households, 
to care for, as they go westward to make homes for themselves and the 
little families that are growing up about them. (The following is from 
report of the Ohio Woman's Home Missionary Union.) " When they 
write, ' It seems very strange to have no Sunday and no church, to see 
stores open, saloons in full blast, horse-racing and prize-fighting "on 
Sundays as well as week-days, and not a religious meeting of any sort,' 
we read through our tears, and wonder if they can keep the faith,^which 
needs such tender nursing here to keep it alive, and there is subjected 
to such a strain." 

But, necessary and important as this work is, other grave trusts are 
committed to our care. Within our borders are gathered people from 
nearly every nation, clime and tongue under heaven. I wish I could 
quote entire the leaflet issued by our Home Missionary Society, entitled 
" Our Foreign Population," and then add some personal experiences 
gained from work among the Poles. There are to-day in^the city of 
Chicago more Germans in proportion to the population than in Berlin 
and more Irish in New York than in Dublin. Minneapolis is the fourth 
city in the world as to its Swedish residents. In Detroit there'are 
gathered more than 26,000 Poles and Bohemians, mostly the^former. 
So we might continue to enlarge the picture, 15,000,000 foreigners 
within our borders, and what of them as to character ? Some, notably 
the Scandinavians, large numbers of whom are in Minnesota, are reach- 
able and teachable ; but they need to be taught. The Hollander s, a 



186 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

large colony of whom are settled in Western Michigan, are an example 
to us by their thrift and love of the church and its ordinances ; these 
things usually go together. But these and such as these are the ex- 
ceptions ; it is not the people who are comfortable and content at home 
who seek to better their condition by going to a strange land. It is 
stated that seventy Tper cent, of the criminals in the Old World come to 
this country after serving out their sentences. Not long since I saw a 
statement that a judge discharged two prisoners who had been con- 
victed (one for murder), on condition that they should come to the 
United States. These are the classes who gather mostly in the cities ; the 
better, more industrious portion go into the far West to occupy the 
land. 

Has God nought to do with this gathering of the nations to our 
shores 1 Isaiah says, " They shall come as a rushing stream which the 
breath of the Lord driveth." They come, bringing with them every 
form of vice, of irreligion, of skepticism, of rampant socialism ; mistaking 
license for liberty an d anarchy for self-government. For ourselves, for 
our children, for our country, there is no hope but in giving the religion 
of the Lord Jesus Christ to these people. The rapid increase of 
immigration causes .the needs to multiply. Official returns show that 
nearly 75,000 foreigners "arrived at the ports of the United States in the 
month of April, 1887 ; 25,000 more than the corresponding month of 
1886. For the four months ending April 30th, 1887, the excess 
over the corresponding months of the last year was nearly 50,000. 
It is said that in Massachusetts to-day every second man you meet 
is a foreigner. The same thing is true of Michigan. At a family dinner 
table, not many days since, as this subject of increase of immigration 
was being discussed, the son asked: " Is this to continue, or is some- 
thino- to be done to check it?" and the father replied: ''The United States 
will soon belong to Europe." 

The work must be done at once ; it will not wait. In an address be- 
fore the Woman's Home Missionary Association, a few months ago, Rev. 
Charles M. Southgate made use of this expression: " When we write the 
year 1900 at the head^of our letters, the principle of crystallization will 
be settled for America, and the fate of America is the fate of Christian- 
ity." Taking into^onsideration then, the great extent and importance 
of our country, the demand for work everywhere, the character of the 
people, the multiplication^ the needs, the necessity for prompt action, 
we see at once the work demands, and must have the help of every man 
and woman^who loves the Master, ay, and of the children, too. Do we 
not hear the voice of the Lord saving to us as to his first chosen people, 
" Go up, possess this land for me ; subdue the nations." 

Let us pause and ask why to us is this command given, this high 
privilege granted. As we listen far a reply once more comes the mes- 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 187 

sage as to them of old, " The Lord thy God hath chosen thee to be a 
special people unto himself above all people that are upon the face of 
the earth. The Lord did not set his love upon you, or choose you, be- 
cause ye were more in numbers than any people, for ye were the fewest 
of all people; but because the Lord loved you." Oh, gracious condescen- 
sion, oh wonderful love, this love of our Father, shown always to us, his 
sinful, unworthy children, reaching its highest expression in the giving 
of his only Son to die for our sins, " and not for ours only, but also for 
the sins of the whole world !" 

From the lips of the divine Redeemer himself came the command to 
woman to spread the news of a Savior risen. When, on the resurrec- 
tion morning, a woman stood weeping by the empty sepulcher, the risen 
Lord, speaking for the first time since his completed victory over death, 
said, "Mary." Oh, what a thrill of joy filled her heart, causing her to turn 
and utter the glad "Rabboni." Recognizing her loyalty there ex- 
pressed, the Master at once gave her her commission, " Go tell." Think 
you, she and the other Mary waited to question the expediency, to con- 
sider what the world, what even the disciples would say? Could they 
do aught else than obey"? The record says: " They departed quickly 
and did run to bring the disciples word." There was then no word of 
man to interfere. The relation between cause and effect was a close and 
natural one. " She had seen the Lord, he had spoken to her, she did 
run to tell the world." I appeal to you, could she have done otherwise? 
The same relation between cause and effect has operated ever since. It 
holds good to-day. Glancing backward over the space between the then 
and now, we see how this truth has been exemplified. But it has re- 
mained for women of the nineteenth century in large numbers to see the 
bright shining of the Savior's face and hear even more plainly his wel- 
come voice giving them their commission. 

The call that first stir-red so many hearts came from the suffering and 
helpless of other lands, and by thorough organization and systematic 
effort, much has been, and is being done for them. But now we are 
startled with a cry of distress that needs no messenger to bring it ; it 
sounds in our very ears, and we are suddenly aroused to see that while 
we have been busy sending the gospel to those in far-off lands, the 
Father, who plans wisely and for a purpose, has been bringing the 
heathen from these very lands to our own doors. We awake to find our 
homes in danger, our institutions threatened, our government imperiled, 
and, saddest of all, our Christian religion, the hope not only of America 
but of all the world, assailed, and in danger of being overthrown. And 
this is not a dread of something yet to be. a disaster to be apprehended 
in the far-off future, but a present crisis, to be met and overcome. 
Christian women are awakfng to see that they have an imperative call to 
work at their own doors, to care for the home heathen. To meet the 



188 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

call and to do the duty, the Woman's Home Missionary Unions are 
springing up over the land, endeavoring by organization to concentrate 
and give wise direction to their labors. Any argument that has been or 
can be used for organization in any line of work applies to this. United 
work led by wise planning is essential to success. We have nothing to 
icaste, either in means or moral forces. In time of war, companies of 
soldiers are gathered in localities and properly officered ; but are they 
then sent out to do battle each where it sees fit, and after its own fash- 
ion? When, think you, the struggle of the Rebellion would have ended, 
with this sort of guerrilla warfare? No, companies must be gathered into 
regiments, regiments into brigades, brigades into divisions, and all mar- 
shalled under a commander-in-chief aided by an efficient staff. Why 
should not we use the same wisdom in planning for the coming of 
Christ's kingdom as we do in worldly matters? 

A few specific reasons why we need State organizations. 

1. To gather and diffuse information. — A few days before I left 
home, a lady said to me : " People are responsive to this work if they 
can only be made to know its needs," and this is practically true. 

2. To arouse interest among the churches, and aid in forming new 
Societies. There is a great work to be done to gather up and utilize the 
latent talent and power in our churches. Crossing the Niagara, as some 
of us did in coming to this gathering, seeing the immense volume of 
water that is constantly pouring over the fall, and losing itself in the 
river below, one cannot but reflect upon the force wasted and the power 
lost that might be used with great effect in doing the world's work. Is 
not the same largely true of the moral and spiritual power that might 
and ought to be utilized in our churches. We must largely increase the 
work among the children and young people. As foreign missionary 
workers we have done much in that line. Now let us see to it that we 
use this power of the children in home work. The children of Michigan 
know more of the heart of Africa than of their own Upper Peninsula ! 
There is need of State organizations to develop interest, and educate 
along these lines. 

3. To get the stimulus and enthusiasm that come from numbers 
and united forces in the annual State meetings. These are powerful fac- 
tors, and these we cannot have without a State society. 

4. To EMPHASIZE THE PRINCIPLE OF SYSTEMATIC GIVING. It Seems to 

me, this must be done in all our churches before the work of our benev- 
olences can be done as they should. Let this principle be recommended 
and urged by our State Unions upon all the auxiliaries, and we shall help 
in accomplishing a work greatly needed. It is the way and the only way 
in which our woman's work can be done effectively. I will not dAvell 
upon this, though it is a theme upon which much can be said, and about 
which I feel very strongly. 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 189 

5. To study the NEEDS in our cities. — I have done this somewhat, 
and am impressed with the fact that the day is not far distant when, in 
addition to its time- honored policy of church-planting, the American 
Home Missionary Socioty must take up more largely the work among the 
foreign population in the cities. This, for many years, will be preparing 
the soil and sowing the seed. The work must be done as it is among 
the heathen on the other side the seas, mainly by Bible women, reading 
God's Word and talking with ihe people in their homes, holding 
mother's meetings, cottage prayer-meetings, gathering the children into 
Sunday-schools, and both mothers and children into sewing-schools. 
There is no other way to reach these people any more than there is those 
in foreign lands. When this work is enlarged, if it is, much of it would 
naturally fall into the hands of women. We need to be ready to take it 
should it thus come to us. It is being successfully done by other de- 
nominations. 

And once more, we need organization, because this work is not to be 
done in a month or a year, but is to last until " He comes whose right it 
is to reign." " And unto him shall tne gathering of the people be." 

Last, but not least, there is needed the leading power, concentrating 
force, the wise planning of the State society in raising the money among 
and from our women. This is part of the 'King's business," and it 
"requires haste." It is an important part, for money is needed con- 
stantly and in largely increasing amounts. Every church should do its 
share and every one in the ch rch his and her part. Hundreds and 
thousands are required from those to whom the Father has intrusted 
large sums; dollars, dimes, nickels and pennies from those whose ability 
is measured by these amounts. Careful planning by State officers to 
gather in these sums from the women in local churches is necessary to 
secure the largest measure of success in this direction. The parent so- 
ciety is too far away to do this. The relation between it and the small 
churches is not realized except when these wish help. The societies 
already existing have proved by their growth and influence, the interest 
they have awakened among tbe women, and the increase of contribu- 
tions gathered, that they are of great value. They have also shown that 
they are practical and forceful. 

But all plans will fail without devotion and consecration. In view of 
all these things, first of all let each one of us take to our own hearts the 
thought of personal consecration, of earnest prayer, of whole hearted 
service ; then with wisdom given from on high, let us push this work of 
thorough State organization, that we may economize our forces, spread 
intelligence, awaken enthusiasm, call into exercise and utilize the Niagara 
power now latent among the women of our churches, and largely increase 
our contributions. Let us by systematic, organized effort place our- 
selves by the side of our brethren in the church, keeping step with them 



190 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

in their onward march ; not permitting them to harbor the thought for 
a moment, that we are doing their work, but by our success in wise 
planning and systematic working, encourage, help and stimulate them 
to greater zeal. And so with our forces well organized, with every man, 
woman and child in their allotted places, with the Great Captain for our 
leader, our rallying cry, " For God and home and native land," the 
motto " Forward !" inscribed on our banner, with weapons not carnal 
but spiritual, let us press on to save America for Christ, and so win the 
world. 



A PAPER, 

BY MRS. C. L. GOODELL, OF ST. LOUIS. 

Ought the ladies belonging to home mission churches to be excused 
from helping in the State work? 

Most certainly not. For many reasons they are the ones who 
should be the most zealous in awakening and extending an 
interest throughout their own State. They are receiving aid from 
outside, and are indebted to others who are doing for them ; one 
way in which they can discharge this obligation is to join in ef- 
forts for the general good. " Freely ye have received, freely give." 
This rule stands good for all. It is a narrow and selfish policy that 
excludes a care for other churches, and seeks only to build up one's 
own. 

By entering into the State work, ladies belonging to mission churches- 
gain the impulse that comes from association with other workers; they 
become acquainted with new and effective methods, and receive helpful 
suggestions which might not come to them apart by themselves. " Iron 
shai'peneth iron." So the workers on different fields quicken and in- 
spire one another, and thereby become more efficient at home. Those 
who are afraid to undertake anything abroad will probably be feeble in- 
struments in their own churches. It is generally true, the more we do 
the more we find we can do. God is always ready to use the willing 
hearts and hands. 

A mistaken sentiment prevails in many of the new and weak 
churches. They say, " We are poor and have no money to give, there- 
fore we cannot at present help in the State work. But it should be re- 
membered that all mission work is not giving money — perhaps it is not 
the chief thing. Certainly if that were all, the work would lack many 
very important elements. It is the laying of one's heart to it that 
makes it succeed. It is so in any enterprise, but especially true of 
mission work. And this, consecrated women in mission churches can do 
as well as others. They can at least meet together and pray ; they can 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 191 

read and learn what others are doing, and what the great needs about 
them are. They can ask the Lord for some share in the general work, 
and then take up the thing at hand with full purpose to do all they 
can. 

I have in mind a Christian lady who has very little money to give 
compared with others she is associated with, and yet she is regarded as 
one of the most efficient and successful and needed helpers in the mis- 
sion circle to which she belongs. Why ? Because she lays her heart 
to the work. She informs herself with regard to the new missions — the 
waste places. She keeps abreast of all that is being done in the broad 
field. She plans and watches for opportunities ; she seeks to interest 
those about her and inspire them ; she takes The Home Missionary, 
and lends it; she circulates leaflets on missionary subjects and informa- 
tion from newspaper articles ; she enlarges the scope of her vision to 
take in the needs of other churches as well as her own. But, having 
done all this, she does not stop here ; she has so learned to deny herself 
for Christ's sake and to sacrifice in order that she may have to give, 
that perhaps the Lord is saying of her, " She hath cast more in than all 
they which have cast into the treasury." 

It is not an uncommon thing when the ladies belonging to a mission 
church are invited to become auxiliary to the State Society, to say, 
" We should like to be associated with you, but we are unable to raise 
the amount required by your constitution," (one dollar or five, as the 
case may be). " "We need every cent we have, to carry on the work in 
our own church, and are scarcely able now to obtain the necessary 
furnishings ; when we Are stronger we will undertake more." 

This is dangerous ground. Supposing that church does grow 
stronger, and come to self-support; it is generally true that with en- 
larged capacity comes also a demand for increased outlay on herself, and 
so the time is delayed, and who shall say when the day will ever come 
that she has got beyond her own need, and able to extend aid to 
others? The only safe way is to begin now, and trust God to multiply 
the seed for sowing. 

How do we teach our children in regard to benevolence? That 
because they have little or nothing of their own they must wait till they 
are independent men and women with .a superabundance of means 
before they can give anything to the Lord 1 Oh no ! we encourage them 
to commence at once to share what they have, and if they have nothing, 
to deny themselves in some way in order that they may have something. 
The principle holds good for a young church. While still dependent 
for her own support, she should reach out in her sympathies and 
prayers and material help to others more needy than herself. She must 
seek to enrich others if she would be enriched. 

In the matter of giving, whether it is time, or influence, or money, 



192 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

or strength, God has established a guide by which we may decide 
questions of Christian duty. " If there be first a willing mind, it is ac- 
cepted according to that a man hath, and not according to that he hath 
not." The " willing mind" means we are ready to use all the resources 
within our reach for the one great purpose of life — that of extending 
Christ's kingdom throughout the world. We shall not be called to 
account for what we have not, but let us be careful how we shut our- 
selves out from God's acceptance, by failing to recognize and use the 
talents we have — for Him. 



METHODS OF COMMUNICATION BETWEEN STATE OFFICERS 
AND LOCAL SOCIETIES. 

BY MRS. ADDISON BLANCHARD, KANSAS. 

1. The most effective method of influencing the individual members 
of the churches is, no doubt, by a personal visit. The hand-clasp, the 
earnest spoken word, the smile, the look of sympathy will awaken an 
interest where the printed word is comparatively impotent. 

2. Where there cannot be the visit, let there be intimate communi- 
cation between the State officers and the local societies through the 
autograph letter. This requires time. Everything that succeeds re- 
quires time. A letter that can be read in the Society — a warm, appre- 
ciative, kindly letter — that recognizes the peculiar condition of that 
particular people, will call forth a heart-response. More can be done 
for the spiritual uplift through our missionary work by the personal 
visit and the autograph letter than by any other means of communica- 
tion. Why? Because we are all interested in the personnel of those 
to whom we look for instruction and direction. We are interested 
even in the chirography of one who cares to know about us or to have 
our co-operation. Whatever attracts us to the representative of a 
society helps win us to the cause. 

3. Send printed leaflets, circulars of encouragement and informa- 
tion to individual members of local societies. 

4. Use the State denominational paper. These communications 
will be read, especially after the £>ersonal intercourse. 



AMERICAN COLLEGE AND EDUCATION SOCIETY. 

Ret. John A. Hamilton, D.D., Secretary. 

10 Congregational House, Boston. James M. Gordon, Esq., Treasurer. 

[Money for the Society may be sent to James M. Gordon, Esq., Treasurer, No. 10 

Congregational House, Boston; or to Rev. Alexander H. Clapp, D.D., 34 Bible 

House, New York.] 

Ministers Scarce ? — How can they be when every desirable vacant 
pulpit has a dozen applicants, and 100 such pulpits hear from 1,200 
waiting ministers ? But let us see : 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 193 

1. Often the same minister writes to many churches ; and 100 min- 
isters might easily write the 1,200 letters. 

2. By recent inquiry in several pastorless churches the writer found, 
as others have, that at least four-fifths of the so-called "applicants" are 
ministers in charge, but thinking of a change (which they may or may 
not make). Ministers without charge are rather seldom heard from. 

Most " calls" but ask a minister to fill one vacancy by making an- 
other! Hence our 1,092 vacant pulpits — sixty-five more than last year. 
And the churches increase eighty- six yearly, while ministers from all 
sources, the partly trained, those from other denominations, etc., gain 
but seventy-one (average of last five years). 

But are not our 1,238 "ministers not in pastoral work" enough for 
the 1,092 vacant pulpits? 

"Yes, if we could have them. But, e.g., in one large conference, of 
seventeen ministers without charge, eight were too old, others other- 
wise engaged, and but two or three could well be pastors! Other in- 
quiries have shown a like result. At this rate our 1,238 ministers with- 
out charge would yield but about 200 available as pastors for 1,092 
vacant pulpits, besides hundreds of churchless needy fields, home and 
foreign. 

These 1,238 ministers certainly include several hundred too old to 
be pastors — for our ministers die at the average age of sixty-seven. 
And of the 387 who have died in the last five years 202, over one-half, 
xcere past threescore years and ten, and eighty-seven were past four- 
score. No wonder that 265 died not in pastoral nor in missionary 
work. Hundreds more (of the 1,238) serve Christ as evangelists, in- 
structors, editors, secretaries, etc., and cannot be sj^ared. A portion 
(far less than of other occupations) have missed their calling or are 
inefficient. What a legion of lawyers, doctors, etc., fail ! But the sen- 
timent, " once a minister always a minister," retains on our rolls hun- 
dreds who will never be pastors. Such the other professions drop from 
their lists. 

Nor can we compel the few, who are able, to fill the small charges 
on scant pay, nor compel the weak churches to pay more. 

Some misadjustment or waste is inevitable in all business, secular 
or religious. We must expect this. We must train enough ministers 
to do our work, home and foreign, with a margin for the varied failures 
flesh is heir to. 

The 1,092 "vacant churches" are mostly weak. But two-thirds of 
our churches in most Western States average not over forty members 
each. Our main work in the West is to nurse the weak into strength. 
Our- State Home Missionary Superintendents, who know best these 
churches, say but few of them ought to die, or will, if only pastors can 
be had to feed them. 



194 THE HOME MISSIONARY. August, 

" Pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest that he would send 
forth laborers." 

And let our gifts to the Education Society "prove the sincerity" of 
our prayers. 

CHILDREN'S BOHEMIAN FUND. 

Previously acknowledged $ 1,564 95 

Connecticut, Fair Haven 

Sa\brook 

Massachusetts, Ware 

Micnigan, Lansing 

Union Home 

New Hampshii e, Epping 

Tilton 

New York, Albany 

KUode Island, Bristol 

$1,710 09 



10 00 


24 95 


50 00 


2 00 


1 (10 


6 19 


6 00 


20 CO 


25 00 



WOMAN'S FUND FOR MISSIONARY SALARIES. 

Previously acknowledged $160 00 

Connecticut, Hartford 20 no 

Middletown 50 00 

District of Columbia, Washington 45 00 

Kansas, Topeka 7 00 

Micnigan, Charlevoix 5 00 

Minnesota, Alexandria 13 00 

Utile Falls 7 00 

St.Paul 7 50 

$314 50 



MISSIONARY BOXES. 



For many years the ladies of our churches have helped this Society and: cheered the 
homes of its missionaries with boxes of clothing and other useful articles. The continuance 
of these favors is earnestly solicited. To secure satisfactory preparation and just distribu- 
tion, attention is invited to the following suggestions. 

1. Apply to the Secretaries to designate a family needing such assistance, and state, 
if practicable, how soon a box will probanly be sent. 

2. If a family is selected without applving to the Secretaries, notify them without delay 
so as to guard against a duplication of gifts. 

3. It several months should elapse before the box is ready to be sent, ascertain from the 
Secretaries whether the missionary's address remains as previously given. 

4. Mark the box plainly, and indelibly, fasten it securely, and forward it to the missionary, 
not by express, but by a Forwarding Company, if practicable ; otherwise, as "fast freight.' 
oy railroad, taking two receipts from the Company. 

5. Write to the missionary, inclosing one of these receipts, a list of the articles sent in 
the box, and the money, $ 2, $ 3, or $4., according to weight and distance, for the payment of 
freight (if it cannot be prepaid). Mention, also, the name of the person to whom a letter 
of ac inowledgment should be addressed. 

6. Keport to the Secretaries the forwarding of the box, its estimated value, and the 
amount sent for freight, in order that the donation may be acknowledged in The Home 
Missionaby. 

7. If a box has been prepared, not for a specified family, but to be assigned by the 
Secretaries, put into it a list of its contents, the name of the association or individual from 
whom it comes, and the address of the person to whom the missionary may send his letter of 
acknowledgment. 

8. Mark the box, "American Home Missionary Society, Bible House, Astor Place, New 
York," adding the name of the place from which it comes. 

9. Write to the Secretaries, inclosing mone\for freight, and stating the time when and 
the line by which the box was sent, its estimated value, and giving a list of contents to guide 
in the assignment of the box. Be careful to state the size of each adult, and the age and 
sex of each child for whom the clothing is intended, as boxes are not opened at the office. 

10. These donations are not deducted from thf grant* of the Society. It needs the same 
amount of money, therefore, in order to fulfill its stipulations with its missionaries, as if no 
auch gifts were provided ; and we trust the friends of Home Missions will not withhold or 
diminish their contributions of money in consequence of their giving other thiugs that are 
neeiil'ul. 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



195 



WOMAN'S STATE H. M. ORGANIZATIONS. 






New Hampshire Female Cent Institution, org. 

I8ur>, Miss Annie A. McFarland, Concord, Sec. 
Minnesota Woman's Home .Missionary Society, org. 

1ST-2, Mrs. li. L. chase, Minneapolis, Sec. 
Nebraska Woman's Home Miss. Association, org. 

Oct., 1874, Mrs. K. li. Baker, Sarton, See. 
Maine, Woman's Missionary Auxiliary, org. June, 

1880, Mrs. Levi L. Paine, Bangor, See. 
Michigan, Woman's Home Missionary society, 

org. May, 1881, Mrs. Leroy Warren, Lansing, 

Sec. 
Kansas, Woman's Home Missionary Society, org. 

Oct., 1881, Mrs. Addison Blauchard, Topeka, 

See. 
Ohio, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org. 

May, l88i!,.Mrs. Flora K. Regal, Oberlin, Sec. 
New York, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Oct., 1883, Mrs C. C. Creegau, Syracuse, 

Sec. 



Wisconsin, Woman's Home Missionary Society 

org. Oct., 1888, Mis. C. Matter, Brodhead, Sec. 
North Dakota, Woman's Home Missionary Soci- 
ety, org. Nov., 1S83, Miss S. E. Judd, Fargo, 

Sec. 
South Dakota, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Sept., 1884, Mrs. W. H. Thrall, Armour, 

Sec. 
Connecticut, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org.Jau.,1885, Mrs. S. M. Hot chkiss, Hartford, 

Sec. 
Missouri, Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. May, 188!" , Mrs. K. P. Bronson, 3lo0 

Chestnut St., St. Louis, Sec. 
Illinois, Woman's Home Missionary Union, org 

Slay#1885, Mrs. C, U. Taintor, Chicago, Sec. 
Iowa, W Milan's Horn™ Missionary Union, 

org. June, 188«, Miss Ella Marsh, Grinuell, Sec 



APPOINTMENTS IN JUNE, 1887. 



2fot in commission last yzar. 
Bolt, Nicholas, St. Paul, Minn. 
Boouey, John R., De Smet, So. Dak. 
Bull, Kicnaid B., Colyin, So. Dak. 
Oarruttiers, v\ illiam, Richmond Hill, N. Y. 
Davies, John F.. Lima, Ohio. 
Da\ ison, Joseph B., Ashtabula, Ohio. 
HorsT, George, St. Louis, Mo. 
Myhren, O. II., Brookville, Chetec, Hay ward and 

Sand Creek, Wis. 
Spanswick, Thomas W., West Superior, Wis. 
Taylor, Charles B., Buena Vista, Colo. 

Re-commissioned. 
Allen, Edward P., Manchester. N. J. 
Bailev, Amos J., Ogden City, Utah. 
Bergstrom, Wilnelm, Husn City, Harris, Rock 

Creek am out-staiion. Minn. 
Bickford, Warren F., Berkeley, Cal. 
Brainerd, Edward R., Los Aogeles, Cal. 
Brown, Annsa A., Mitchell, So. Dak. 
Bush, Frederick W., Perry, Mich. 
Cate, George H., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Chin. nden. Andrew H., Ceredo, West Va. 
Claflin, Arthur H., Sheridan, Sidney Center and 

Bushnell Center, Mich. 
Clafliu, George P., Dunlap, Kan. 
Clancy, William P., Arlington and Fontenelle, 

Neb. 
Coffman, Arthur W., Denver, Colo. 
Cooke, William H., Oakland. Cal. 
Dada, William B., Stanton and Pilger, Neb. 
Daniels, Henry M., Oceanside, Carlsbad and 

De Luz, Cal. 
Davis, David L., Carbondale, Penu. 
Dexter, Granville M., Soquel, Cal. 
Dinsmore, Edward P., Little Shasta Valley and 

Central Siskiyou, Cal. 
Douglass. Alexander, Unity and vicinity, Mo. 
Dver. Edward N., Gait, Cal. 
Eckles, Jonu G , Tulare, Cal. 
Edwards, Jonathan, Spokane Falls, Wash. Ter. 
Fisk,Perrin B.,Altainonte and Lake Brantley,Fla. 
Fisk, Pliny B., Gettysburg and out-stations, So. 

Dak. 
Foster, Jesse D., San Bernardino, Cal. 
Frazee, Jonn H., Kroxviile, 1'emi. 
Griffiths, Griffith, Alturas, South Fork, Canby and 

Cetiterville, Cal. 
Griffiths, Henry. Orford and Park, Neb. 
Gurnet, John H., Dover, So. Dak. 
HadJen, Jacob W., Freewater, Moline, Wilcox 

andHildreth, Neb. 



Hall, George C, Astoria, Or. 

Hall, Russell T., Tavares, Lone Park, ML Dora 

and Taugerine, Fla. 
Howell, Edward B., Mojave and Victor, Cal. 
Houghton, John C, Prescott, Ariz. 
Houldtng, Horace, Riverside and Chino, Cal. 
Hubbard, William B., Chamberlain, So. Dak. 
Hull, John H., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Humphrevs, Thomas A., Cawker City, Kan. 
Huntley, Sauford F., Templeton, So.'Dak. 
Hurlbut, Henry C, Eastlake. Mich. 
Johnston, Thomas C, Honey Creek, Kahoka, 

Pleasant Hill and out-station, Mo. 
Kyle, James H., Ipswich and vicinity, So. Dak. 
Langley, Henry C, Rocklin, Cal. 
Ullie, Isaac B., Bay Mills and Superior, Mich. 
McCunn, Drummond, ban Jacinto, Perris and 

out-station, Cal. 
McHenry, Feargus G., Bloomington and Dial, 

Kan. 
McNeill, Samuel M., Sleepy Eye and out-station, 

Minn. 
May, Oscar G., Sunol Glen and Nilee, Cal. 
Merrill, Adams H., Heber and Midway, Utah. 
Morse, Milton J., Carbondale and Ridgeway, 

Kan. -, 

Nelson, Andrew G., Anoka, St. Francis and,Ham 

Lake, Minn. 
Norton, Reuben, Eden and Alcester, So. Dak. 
Oakey, James, David City and Deer Creek, Neb. 
Osboru, Russell S., Ash Rock, New Harmony and 

Mt. Ayr, Kan. 
Packard, Abel K., Highland Lake, Colo. 
Philbrook, Charles E., Sierra Valley, Cal. 
Phillips, John H., Los ADgeles, Cal. 
Plat*, Merritt F., Poway and out-stations, CaL 
Pressy, Edwin S., New Lots, N. Y. 
Prucha. John, st. Paul, Minn. 
Rice, Orthillo V., Columbus, Neb. 
Richards, Emanuel, Wano and Bird City, Kan. 
Robbins, Anson H., Lake Preston, Okinam and 

North Preston, So. Dak. 
Roberis, Griffith, Dawn, Mo. 
Rose, Samuel, Philips, Fla. 
Ruddock, Edward N., Villard and Glenwood, 

Minn. 
Schnacke, Leon C, Clay Center, Kan. 
Seceoinbe, Charles, Sprirgfield and Running 

V\ ater, So. Dak. 
Sewaro, Arthur L., Coalville, Echo and Henefer, 

Utau. 
Smith .George H., Walnut Grove, Minn. 
Smith, T. M., Buffalo, Wyo. 



196 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



August, 



Snell, William W., Rushford and Yucatan, Minn. 

Steele, William, Stephen, Minn. 

Stewart, William C, Etna, Ft. Jones, Oro Fino, 

Callahan's and out-stations, Cal. 
Strong, Jacob tL. Clavton and Pacheco, Cal. 
Sumoer, Cnarles B., Pomona. Cal. 
Taylor, Raynsiord, Green Valley and Guernville, 

Cal. 
Thomas, Richard H., Modesto, Cal. 
Tubbs, William H., Bethany, Byron and Marsh 

Creek, Cal. 
Tuthill, Edward B., San Miguel and out-stations, 

Cal. 



Uzzell, Thomas A.. Denver, Colo. 

Veazie, Walter C, Pueblo, Colo. 

Wallace, Stryker A., Billings, Mon. 

Waterman, Alfred T., Charlevoix, Mich. 

Welch, Moses c, Pomona, Fla. 

Wells, John A., Dwight, Gralton and Wynde- 
mere, No. Dak. 

Wilde, James, Scatter Creek, Center Ridge, Buf- 
falo, Mound Valtey and Cottage Grove, Kan. 

Wilson, John J., Onaga and Clear Creek, Kan. 

Wolcott, William H., Ontario and out-station, 
Cal. 

Woodard, Francis C, St. Louis, Mo. 



RECEIPTS IN JUNE, 1887. 



MAINE— $74. 25. 

Auburn. Center Minot Ch., $17 ; 

Mot tier's Gold piece, $5, by Miss H. L. 

Jones $22 00 

East Machias, A Friend 2 00 

Rockland, by S.J. Shaw 40 00 

Scarborough, First Cong. Sunday-school, 

by J. Y. Stall 10 25 

NEW HAMPSHIRE— $149.87. 

Alton, by Rev. E. F. Borchers 5 00 

Bedford, Dea. Ge orge 2 00 

Chesterfield Factory, Cn., $3.04; Rev. 

A. E. Hail, $1.25 4 29 

Concord, A Friend 5 00 

Dover, First Ch., by Dr. S. H. Wheeler. 82 52 
Eppiug, Children's concert at Coag. Ch. 
for children's Bohemian fund, by 

Mrs. Abby T. Spauldiug 6 19 

Exeter, A Thank- offering 25 00 

Jatt'rey, by Rev. W. M. Livingston 8 87 

Loudon, J. R. Swett 5 00 

Til on, Cong. Sunday-school, a class of 
litne Girls for Children's Bohemian 

fund, by Rev. C. C. Sampson 6 00 

VERMONT— $114.22. 

Cornwall. Miss Mary A. Mead 5 00 

Lunenburg, Mrs. D. W. Chandler 1 40 

Rutland, Ch., to const. D. G. Morgan 

and G. K. Montgomery L. Ms., by F. 

W. Gary 100 00 

Vermont, A Friend 100 

Waterbury, by Rev. C. M. Sheldon 6 82 

MASSACHUSETTS— $7,172.50; of which 
Legacies, $1,000.00. 



Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. B. 

Palmer, Treas. for Western work 

among Foreigners 

Adams, First, by E. Humphrey.. 

Miss Julia F. Kimball, special 

Andover, Chapel Ch., balance, by Rev. 

C. C. Carpenter 

Boston, On account of Legacy of John 

Gilbert, by Elizabeth G. Frost, Ex. .. . 
Berkley Street, Y. P. S. C. E., by 

Grace S. Peirce. 

Brookiine, Edge Hill Road, A Friend.. 
Chicopee, Ladies of Cong. Ch., for 

freight, by Rev. W. E. Dickinson — 

Concord, E. C. Damon 

Hadley, Russell Ch., by Rev. E. S. 

Dwight 

Hopkinton. by J. M. Ste wart 

Lenox, by E. Barrett 

Massachusetts, A Friend 

Salem, Crombie Street Ch. and Soc, to 

const. Frank A. Brown and Henry J. 

Pratt L. Ms., by Dea. O. Thayer 



4,500 00 
52 00 

1 00 

4 35 
1,000 00 

2 00 
10 00 

4 00 
25 00 

39 46 

108 12 
58 50 
100 00 

126 67 



Shrewsbury, The Children's Miss. Soc. 
" Lights on the HiL," by Agnes T. 

Bemis $25 00 

South Hadley, Teachers and Pupils Mt. 
Holyoke Sem., by Sarah H. Melvin.. 12 00 

Springfield, " H. M." 1,000 00 

Taunton, S. B. Simmons 5 40 

Ware, Mt. Hermon Band of Boys, by 
Mrs. G. H. Coney, special for. Bo- 
hemian Work 50 00 

West Boylston, C. T. White 4 00 

Winchendon, A Friend 10 00 

Worcester, C. A. Lincoln's Sunday- 
school class, Plymouth Ch., by C. A. 

Lincoln 35 00 

Errata: June No., p. 79, column one, 
ior"Milles" read "Miilis." Against 
Springfield, South, for u $157.40" read 
' ; $157.46." 

RHODE ISLAND— $983.31 ; of which Leg- 
acy, $758.31. 
Bristol, First Cong. Sunday-school, for 

Children's Bohemian fund 25 00 

East Providence, A Friend 200 00 

Newport, Avails cf Legacy of Mary A. 
Roberts, by C. A. Ives, Master in 
Chancery 758 31 

CONN ECTICUT— $1 ,537. 75. 
Missionary Soc. Conn., W. W. Jacobs, 

Treas., by Rev. W. H. Moore, Sec 140 00 

Received by Mrs. S. M. Hotchkiss, Sec. 

Woman's H. M. Union : 

Bridgeport, South Ch. Ladies' 
Social Circle, special $40 00 

Han ford, Cong. Sunday-school 
of First Ch., $12, for Woman's 

Dept.,$20 32 00 

72 00 

Bethel, From Ladies' Mite boxes, $20.05; 

A Friend, $50 70 05 

Chester, Mrs. A. L. Smith 5 00 

Connecticut, A Friend 50 00 

Connecticut, A Friend 73 00 

Cornwall, First, by M. Beers 33 00 

Darien,byM. S.Mather 38 86 

Fair Haven, Y. P. S. C. E. of First Ch., 

special, by Rev. B. Hart 10 00 

Hampton, A Friend 5 oo 

Litchfield, A Fiiend 10 00 

Madison, A Friend 8 20 

Middletown, South Cong. Ch. Sunday- 
school, special, $50 anu $25 by E.Payne 75 00 

Milford, First, by N. D. Piatt 250 00 

Morris, Mary W. Skilton 1 06 

Naubuc, Mrs. N. W. Goodrich 104 00 

New Haven, First Ch., by F. S. Bradley 117 60 

From Our Cou? try 2 00 

New London, First, bv C. D. Boss, Jr.. . 80 87 

New Preston, John Beadle 5 00 

Norwalk, Mrs. Bissell's Schools, special 25 00 
Ridgefieldj by A. L. Paddock 63 70 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



197 



Savbroor, Cong. Sunday-school for 

Children's Bohemlau tund $24 95 

Somers, by Rev. L. W. Perctval 22 50 

Walllmrford, by G. M. Judd 110 06 

Waterbury, '' A" 100 

Waterto wn, by H. T. Dayton 43 4<» 

West suffleM, by B. Sheldon 16 72 

Winsted, First Ch.,by J. 1). Baldwin, in 
full, to const. Uev. H. N. Kinney, Mrs. 
H. N. Kinney. Mrs. C. N. Sage and 
Mrs. J. A. Smith L. Ms 79 84 

NEW YORK— $5,141.77; of which Lega- 
cies, $4,P20.27. 

Received by Rev. C. c. Creegan: 

Morrisville,Rev. A. S. Emmons $5 00 

Oswego, i Q., add'] 25 

Otisco, Woman's II. M. Soc... 14 00 

19 25 

Received by Mrs. L. H. Cobb, 
Treas. of Woman's Home Miss. 
Union of New York: 
Albany, Ladies' Aux. for Bo- 
hemian work $20 00 

Brooklvn, Ladies' Soc. of Puri- 
tan Ch., to const. Mrs. C. H. 

Dickson a L. M 50 00 

Seneca Falls, Woman's II. M. 

Union 8 00 

78 g 

Brooklvn, W. B. Smith, $10; From a 

Lndy Friend, $10 ; A Friend, $2 22 on 

Ellington, by Rev. A. W. Taj lor 4 00 

Great Neck, Legacy of Mrs. Amanda 
Wells, by O. J. Wells, AM'y for Ex's. 4,745 27 

Hermon, by Rev. J. J. Munfo 1 86 

Hicks, Mrs. S. A. Davis 18 8a 

Homer, B. W. Payne 10 00 

Jamaica, Legacy of Mrs. Keziah Griffin, 

by John A King, Ex. 50 00 

Lewis and Wadbams' Mills, by Rev. A. 

R. Crawford 10 25 

Moriah, Ladies of Cong. Ch., by Mrs. 

K. A. Barber 9 55 

By Rev. J. H. Butler 5 oo 

New Lebau m, by J. Kend ill 21 10 

New York City, Pilgrim Ch., J. A. Jami- 
son. $10 ; Robbie H. Jamison, dec. 
Missionary niuney left in his box 
wlien the* Lord called him home, 82, 

by H. N. Lock wood 12 00 

Nor wo id, First, by W. H. Kellev 40 On 

Oneonia. L. J. Satford 5 00 

Oswego Falls, by Rev. C. Olmstead 2 50 

Saratoga, Miss Julii M. Gilmore, to 

const, herself a L. M 50 oo 

Bequest of Mary L. Bailey, by E. 

B illey. Ex 25 On 

A Friend 56 

Summer Hill, by Kev. C. H. Curtis 6 02 

Wilming on, by Rev. D. Fish 5 61 

NEW JERSEY— $211.70. 

BloomBeld, Mrs. G. A.Wheeler .. 5 00 

Buffalo Grove and Wesley, by Rev. L. 

C. Johnson 1 75 

Chester, Jacob H.Crane 40 00 

Closter. by Rev. G. W. Piack 13 69 

Mont .-lair, Ladies H. M. Soc, by Mrs. 

J. J. Cooper, to const. Mrs. S. "Wilde, 

Mrs. W. Holmes and Mrs. H. Dike L. 

Ms 150 00 

Warrcnville, by Rev. G. Bafierstscher.. 1 26 

PENNSYLVANIA-? I7J. 18. 

Altoona, ©. S. D 5 00 

Antrim, $2; Rev. D. P. Jones. $5.50 7 50 

Blossburg, by Rev. A. Junes 5 00 

Brisbin, by Kev. T. C.Benjamin 5 00 

Corry, R^v. E. H. Martin 2 50 

Jermyn. Welsh Ch., bv J.Roberts 5 oo 

Philadelphia. A Friend 200 00 

Pott rville. by Rev. T. P. Thomas 10 45 

Ridgeway, First, by W. 11. Osterhout... 11 33 



Shamokin, collected by Rev.B. M. 

Hughes: 

David Llewellyn, $43.50; Mrs. 
Mary D.Jones, $5.oo; B. Mor- 
tals Hughes,t5; Mrs. Margaret 
Uren, $3; John Edwards, $2; 
Fivan R. Jones, $2; John A. 
Phillips, $2; Evan L. Jones, 
$2; Mrs. M. Simouds, $2; C. 
C. Leader and brother, $2; 
Daniel Richards, $1; Jonn W. 
Evans, $1; nomas D. Wil- 
liams, $1; BenjamiuMcrgans, 
$1; Miss M. A. Roberts, $1; 
Mrs. R. Harris, $i; Mrs. Ra- 
chel Schminkey, $1; Mrs. Da- 
vid Roacn, $1; T. F. Slmonds, 
$1; Mrs. T. F. Simonds, $1; 
Mrs. Sarah Parry, $1; Hopkin 
Davies, $1; Thomas L. Wil- 
liams, $1; George Greasley, 
$1: Mrs. Hewitt, $1; Mrs. Jen- 
nett Jenkins, $1; Thomas J. 
Thomas, $l; Mrs. David J. 
Davies, $1; John T. Thomas, 
$1; Mis. Ann Williams, $1; 
James W. Evans, $1; Thomas 
Reynolds, $1; James Rey- 
nolds, $1; Enoch Edmuncis,$l; 
David Thnmas, $1; Mrs. J. A. 
Cardwell, 75c; Richatd Grif- 
fiths, 50c; Miss Mary Harris, 
5Jc; Mrs. Mary Harris, 50c; 
Mis. Thomas Lewis, .50-.; 
Mis. Lizza Williams, 50c; 
Miss Jane Williams, 50c: 
Mrs. Daniels, 50c; Mrs. 
Thomas J. Thomas, 50c; Miss 
S. A. Thomas, 50c; Miss Ra- 
chel Thomas, 50c; John W. 
Thomas, 50c; Miss Flower 
Edwards, 50c; R. T. Price. 
50c.; Mis. R. T. Price, 50c; 
Mrs. .Margaret Jones, 50c; 
Mrs. Maria Culton, 50c; Sam 
Bowden,50c; J.J. John. 50c; 
Mrs. Enoc Jones, 50.; Tliom- 
i.vd, 50c; Lewis Parry, 
50c; William R.Jenkins. 5 ic; 
Miss May W.Jones, 25c: John 

Jones, 25c; Mrs Boyd, 25c $106 00 

Slatington, oy Rev. W. H. Jones 10 00 

Wiikesbarre, by Rev. F. Gwynne 5 00 

M AR Y L AND— $50. 00. 
Maryland, A Friend 50 00 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— $50.00. 

Washington, First Ch.. Ladies' H. M. 
Soc, special, by Miss Lizzie Patterson 25 00 
Ministering League of First Cn., for 
Woman's Dept., by Mrs. S. M. New- 
man 20 00 

By Rev. W. C. Sconeld 5 00 

GEORGIA— fS.10. 

Atlanta, by Rev. W. Shaw s 00 

FLORIDA-S46.77. 

Apopka, by Rev. W. T. Richardson 5 00 

Jacksonville, Union Ch., by F. W. Lv- 

man *. . is 07 

Norwalk and Kerr City, by Rev. B. T. 

Stafford .* 2 50 

Port Orange, add'l, $2.74 ; Holly Hill, 

$8.46; Rev. D. M. Breckenridge, $10, 

by Rev. D. M. Breckenridge 21 20 

TEXAS— $554.75. 

Dallas, First, by E. M. Powell to const. 

Rev. C. I. Scofield a L. M 551 75 

Pal estine, by Rev. E. F. Fa'.es 3 00 



198 



THE HOME MISSIONAKY. 



August, 



NEW MEXICO— $55.00. 

Carthage, J. L.Allison $50 oo 

Georgetown, by Kev. S. Edwards 5 00 

ARIZONA— $75.00. 
Prescott, by Rev. J. C. Houghton 75 00 

OHIO— $564. 54. 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser : 

Alexandria, by D. Williams $8 25 

Brighton, Mrs. M.H.Smith.... 1 00 
Clevelaud, Franklin Avenue Ch. 
• aiid Sunday school, by Rev. S. 

B. Shlpman 25 36 

Hudson, by Miss E. E. Metcalf . 16 23 

50 84 

Received by S. P. Churchill, Treas. Bo- 
hemian Board, Cleveland, in May : 
Cleveland, Jennings Ave. Ch...$l0 00 

Plymouth Ch 2 00 

Gustavus, Sunday-school 4 00 

Lorain Co. Cong. Sunday-school 

Assoc 14 00 

Medina, Sunday-school i5 50 

Nelson, Sunday-school 4 43 

49 93 

Ohio Woman's H. M. Union, by Mrs. 

Ella J. Mahony, Treas.: 

Burton, Mrs. A. H. Hotchkiss.. 2 00 

Cleveland, First, L. M. S 35 00 

First, Y. P. S. C. B 3 25 

Harmar, by 11. M. S 43 00 

Hudson, by H. M. S 3 15 

Mansfield, First, W. B. S 45 10 

Medina, L. M. S 10 50 

Oberlio, Second, L. M. S b5 00 

Springfield, First, H. M. S 5 00 

232 00 

Ashtabula, Second by Rev. J. B.Davison 7 67 

Berea, First, by C. W. Sinturn 5 S8 

Cleveland, Plymouth Ch., by S. P. 

Churchill 79 40 

Cow Kun, by Rev. R. G. Beynou 3 00 

Perrysburg, Mrs. Mary Hatch, by S. P. 

Tolman 5 no 

Toledo, First, by M. Brigham 100 71 

Second, by Rev. J. C. Agauier 10 00 

Windham, First, by G. A. Merwiu 20 11 

INDIANA— $12.50. 



Angola, Rev. H. B. Knight and wife.. 

Hebron and Hobart, by Rev. D. W. 

Andrews 



10 CO 



ILLINOIS— $21.13. 

Chicago, Leavitt Street Ch., by A. M. 
Ellsworth 18 13 

Springfield, Mrs. C. M. Salter, a Thank- 
offering 5 00 

Western Springs, Lovella Sillence 1 00 

MISS0URI-$51.74. 

Bevier, by Rev. J. V. Willis 1 30 

St. Louis, Plymouth Ch., by C. L. 

Wolber 30 00 

By Rev. J. L. Smith 7 94 

By Rev. G. Holmquist 11 00 

Unity, by Rev. A, Douglass 150 

MICHIGAN— $547.06. 

Received by Rev. L. Warren : 

Alamo, J. Hackley $20 00 

Covert, Y. P. S. C.E 1 10 

Croton 2 50 

Dundee, Children's Day Coll.... 5 00 

Goodrich, Mrs. Campbell 2 00 

Kalkaska, Sunday-school 4 24 

Lexington 3 50 

N orth ville, D. Pomeroy 5 00 

Olivet 50 00 



1 00 



50 13 
5 00 
5 00 


1 00 
1 00 



Port Huron $80 00 

Rochester , 2 50 

Wheatland, add'l 50 

176 34 

Received by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, 
Treas. Woman's H. M. Soc. of 
Mich., in May: 

Charlevoix, L. M. S., special.. . $5 00 
Cooper, Y.L. M. S ... 10 00 

Pledge Cards 2 50 

Thank-offerings, at Annual 
Meeting 12 70 

Coll. in Mite Box, by Belle 

Cady 3 27 

Grand Junction, A Friend 5 00 

Greenville 10 83 

Lansing, Willing Helpers, for 

Bohemian fund 2 00 

Muskegon 10 00 

Ooondaga, Pledges 3 00 

Port Huron, Mrs. C. M. Stock- 
well 

Saginaw Conference: 

Bay city $11 44 

Bridgeport 6 22 

East Saginaw 29 22 

Y.L.M.C 2 00 

Munger l 25 

St. Johns, Cheerful Givers 

Sheridan, W. H. M. S 

Union Home, Mrs. Daniels, for 

Bohemian fund 

Grandma Stevens 

VU-ksburg, Busv Bees 2 60 

West Adrian, W. M. S 10 00 

$140 03 
In June: 

Alpena $32 78 

Calumet 6 63 

Grass Lake, Y. L. M. S 15 00 

Ithaca 4 98 

Manistee 25 00 

Reed City, Contribution Chil- 
dren's Day 4 40 

South Haven 5 00 

98 19 238 22 

Alba, by Rev. R. M. Burgess 1 0o 

Alnnra, First, by Rev. E. Linkletter 3 00 

Banks, $4.70; Eastport, $3.50, by Rev. P. 

F. McClelland s 20 

Bay Mills and Superior, by Rev. I. B. 

Lillie 2 83 

Clio, $9.21; Genesee, $3.19, by Rev. F. C. 

Wood 12 40 

Coral, by Rev. L. P. Soeiman 13 50 

Eastlake, by Rev. H. C. Hurlbut 6 00 

Edmoie, by Rev. H. Marsh 4 72 

Fruitport, by Rev. J. H. Dole . 1 25 

Hersey, by Rev. T. A. Porter 5 00 

Hudson ville, by Rev. J. C. Abiett 4 10 

Leonidas, A. Floyd Kingsle'y 25 

Perry, $2.64; Rev. F. W. Bush, $2.36 5 00 

Rockford, by Rev. W. W. DeGeer 14 00 

Traverse City, First, by J. E. Johnson. . 51 25 

WISCONSIN— $29.27. 

Bloomer, $20.75; West Superior, $4; Rev. 

G. A. Hood, $5, by Rev. G. A. Hood. . 29 27 

IOWA-$35.50. 

Big Rock, by J. M. Mitchell 5 00 

Charles Citv, A Boy, by Miss C. Hobart 50 

Gleuwood, by Van Halter 20 00 

McGregor, J. H. Ells worth ... 5 00 

Traer, From one of the Church 5 00 

MINNESOTA— $258. 15. 

Received by Re". J. H. Morley : 

Minneapolis, Plymouth Ch $55 00 

Winona, Gertrude Staples 20 00 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



199 



Minn. W. H. M. S., by Mrs. J. N. Cross. 
Treas.: 

Alexandria, special £13 00 

Faribault lo 00 

Lit < le Falls, special T 00 

Mantorville 5 00 

Monticello 9 40 

Paynesville . 10 oo 

st. Cloud o t' 1 * 

St. Paul, Plymouth l<» 50 

• Atlantic, special T 60 

Villard 5 51 

83 91 168 91 

Benson, by Rev. C. A. Ruddock :; ' M 

Breckeorldge, by Rev. G. A. Schram.. 15 00 

Cottage Grove, by Kev. W. Gill 25 W) 

llirclmisoii, ,\irs. W. J. Ives 2 00 

Lakeland and Alton, by Kev. ,1. Chan- 
dler 4 *° 

Leecn Lake, A Friend 5 oo 

Minneapolis, First, by \V. F. Decker... 15 67 

By Rev. G. 11. Gate 5 00 

By Rev. K P. Norris 5 < 

By Rev. D. Magnus 15 no 

Sleepy Eye, by Kev. 8. M. McNeill 3 57 

KANSAS— flSl 56. 

Altoona and Village Creek, by Rev. T. 
V. D ivies 

Argentine, by Rev. II. R. McCartney.. 

Capioma, by D. S. Hibbard 

Cedarville, M. T. Grove, by Rev. W. C 
Sanford 

Chapman and Sutphen's Mills, by Rev. 
(J. U. Perry 

Chase, by Re v. A. I. Bradley 

Columbus, by U. Colvin 

Ford, Ladies' Miss. Soc, by Mrs. W. B. 
Snaw 

Junction Citv, by Rev. M. S. Riddle 

Milford, by Rev. R. B. Foster 

Mouud Cuy, by Rev. O. E. Lake 

North Lawrence. by Rev. T. F. Norris.. 

Oneida, by Re v . C. E. Hoy t 

Sabetha, First Co., to const. William 
Graham a L.M., by Rev. J. G. Dough- 
erty, Treas. Kan. H. M. Soc 

Topeka, Ladies' H. M. Soc., by Mrs. G. 
M. Perry, for Woman's Dept 

Wabaunsee, First Ch. of Christ, by J. 
F. Willard 

NEBRASKA— $107.45. 

Aurora, by R e v. E. Cressman 

Bradshaw and Randolph, by Rev. H. 

Geer 

Doniphan, North Hastings and West 

Hamilton, by Rev. J. H. Embree 

Genoa, by Rev. II. C. Bosworth 

Martinsburg and Bethel, by Rev. S. 

Pearson 

Nebraska City, by Rev. A. Clark 

Newcastle, by Rev. W. J. Paske 

Omaha, by Rev. H. C. Crane 

Riverton, by Rev. W. S. Hampton 

silver Creek, by Rev. J. Roberts 

Upland, by Rev. VV.H. Houston,through 

Rev. J. L. Maile 

NORTH DAKOTA— $67.32. 

Dawson and Tappan.by Rev. A.J. Pike 
Grand Forks, North Dakota Ladies' H. 

M. Soc, by Hattie A. Joy 

Hope, by Rev. T. W. Thurston 

Jamestown, by Rev. D. Wirt 

Wahpeton, by Rev. G. B. Barnes 

SOUTH DAKOTA— $79. S2. 

Buffalo Gap, by Rev. E. E. Frame 

Canton, by Rev. J. L. Granger 

Carthage and Canova. $33 24; Rev. L. E. 

Osgood, $5. by Rev. L. E. Osgood. ... 

Dead wood. Ladies' Miss. Soc, by Mrs. 

S. Konsigsbergeu 



24 11 
20 mi 

1 50 

2 00 

9 50 
12 
1 00 

4 15 
6 

3 50 
3 80 
3 00 

10 00 



67 00 


7 00 


7 00 


18 00 


6 00 


16 00 
20 00 


8 05 
15 00 
5 15 

10 (0 
1 5" 
4 40 



Howard and Win f red, by Rev. I. G. 

Gordan $3 43 

Letcher, by Rev. J. W. Russell i »>0 

Rapid ( It?, by Kev. J. \V. Davis 15 00 

Scotland, by kev. E. Jose 3 50 

COLORADO— $141.50. 

Denver, by Rev. G. M. Mcacham 32 50 

Baton, by Rev. J. w. King 25 oo 

Greeley, First, by A. T. Bacon so oo 

Otis, by Rev. G. Dungau 4 00 

MONTANA— $7.50. 

Butte City, by Rev. J. B. (lark 2 50 

Livingston, by Rev. W. C. Fowler i 5 00 

UTAH-$25.00. 

Salt Lake City, by Rev. A. Monroe 25 OO 

CALIFORNIA— $58.50. 

Bidwelland Cedarville, by Rev. D. F. 

Taylor 5 60 

Buei-a Vista, by Rev. C. B. Taylor 5 00 

Clayton, $6.60; Paeheeo, $6.90, by Rev. 

J. H. Strong 13 50 

San Diego, Rev. J. U. Harwood, D.D.. 35 00 

OREGON— $33.30. 

Beaver Creek, by Rev. H. R. Jones 3 08 

Oregon City, by Rev. G. A. Rockwood.. 30 30 

WASHINGTON TERRITORY— $35.05. 

Ft rndale and Semiahmoo, by Rev. G. 

Baker i 50 

John's River and Wynoochee, by Rev. 

O . A. Thomas 2 00 

Slaughter and White River, by Rev. O. 

L. Fowler 3 no 

Spokane Falls, by Rev. J. Edwards 5 00 

Steilacoom, by Rev. C. E. Newberry... 23 55 

AFRICA— $20.00. 
Grant vllle Natal, South, by Mrs. Abbie 

T. Wilder, by J. (i. Root 20 00 

Home Missionary 157 §1 

$19,035 37 



2 75 



13 00 



10 00 
13 T5 

21 34 
9 23 


7 45 
4 2> 



Donations of Clothing, etc. 

Charleston, S. C, Ladies' Home Miss. 
Soc. of Circular Ch., by C. E. Lance, 
box. 

Chieopes, Mass., Ladies of First Ch., by 
Kev. V\m. E. Dickinson, barrel and 
freight. 

St. Paul, Minn., Woman's Home Miss. 
Soc. of Park Ch., by Mrs. Nathan Gal- 
lup, box and freight £40 35 

WestS> Id, Mass., Ladies' Benev. Soc. of 
Second Ch., by Mrs. Henry Ilooktr, 
barrel and freight 79 27 



Receipts of the Massachusetts Home Missionary So- 
ciety, in June, Rev. Edwin B. Palmer, Treas. 

Andover, Ballardvale, Union, by Rev. S. 

BoAker $5 00 

Auburn, by Rev. S. D. Hosmer 55 00 

Boston, A Friend, " C" 10(0 

Mrs. Susan Collins 5 o 

Brighton, Evangelical, by Rev. J. £. 

Fuliertcn 2 00 

Union, by Albtrt Gay 290 80 

Braintree, First, by A. B. Keith 28 43 

Canton Cetiter, Mrs. Edward S. Caufleld. 2 eo 

Carter, Miss Sabra, Income of Fund... 7 5.1 

33 24 Chelsea, A Friend, "R" 60 

I First, by H. W. Jeffers ' C5 1 

7 00 'ihird, by John Bell \." 5905 



200 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



August, 1887. 



Diver, Orth., by T. S. Norton $10 00 

Dunstable, by James M. Swallow 50 0i 

Easton, South, James Kankin, by Rev. F, 

P. Cnapin 7 50 

Gloucester, West, by James W. Andrews 11 00 
Greenfield, Second, by Lucy A. Sparhawk 42 94 
Hampden Benevolent Assoc, by Chas. 

Marsi, Treas.: 

Chieopee, First $60 56 

Second 55 14 

Longmeadow, East 5 no 

Ludlow 16 18 

Springfield, Indian Orchard 12 14 

Olivet 25 25 

West Springfield, Mittineague 19 81 

194 08 

Hyde Park, First, by J. Ellery Piper 35 60 

Sunday-school, by D. W. Lewis 50 56 

Kingston, Mayflower, by Rev. Z. Crowell. 20 00 
.Leicester, First, on account of R. M. 

Tail's work, by J. C. Watson 20 14 

On account of R. M. Tafi's work, by 

H. A. White 30 00 

Lynn, First Ch. of Christ, by C. W. Royce 53 00 

Maiden, First, by Herbert Porter 59 0'> 

Newbury, First, by Ed ward Perkins 28 28 

Newburyport, Belleville, by Rev. D. T. 

Fiske, D.D 22176 

Newton Highlands, Sunday-school, by 

Wm. B. Wood, Supt 34 62 

Northampton, First, by J. H . Searle 320 T4 

Piustield, Soutn, by U. M. Peirson 31 74 

Reading, by S. G.B.Pearson .. . 25 0U 

Smithfield, R. I., Miss" S. A.," by MissF. 

W. Bowen 10 00 

Walpoie, N. IL, Sunday-school, by E. K. 

Seabury 20 45 

Ware, First, by W. L. Brakenridge 2S 4" 

Wellfleet, First, by Mrs. B. Kemp 6 00 

South, by Rev. Joshua S. Gay 10 no 

West Boxford, by I. W. Andrew 12 00 

Wincaester, First, by Eugene TaDpan 156 78 

Woburn, Ladies' Char. Reading Soc, by 

Mrs. Maria R. Bickford, to const. Mrs. 

Helen C. Hanson a L. M 30 00 

Worcester, Union, by S.Newton 256 05 

Wrentham, First, by S. M. Gerould 25 04 

$2,331 06 
Home Missionary 4 20 

$2,335 26 

Donations of Clothing, etc., received at the office oj 
the Mass. Home Miss. Soc, in June, 

Cambridgeporf, Pilgrim, Ladies, by Mrs. 
C. G H. Benuinck, sent in Oct., '86, but 
not reported, 1 bbl $65 00 

GrotoD, Ladies, oy Jennie H. Thayer, sent 
in Oct., '86, but not, reported, 1 bbl 165 00 

Leicester, Ladies' Char. Soc, by Miss E. 
E. Loring, sent in Oct., '86, but not re- 
ported, bbl. and freight 126 80 

Merrimac, Ladies' Social Circle, by Mrs. 
O. F. Seavey, bbl 96 23 

Newton,Eliot, Ladies' Benev. Soc, by Mrs. 
A. E. Crosby, bbl. and package and 
freight on May bbl 194 84 

Templetou, Ladies' Benev. Soc, by Mrs. 
M. A. Whittemore 31 30 

$679 17 

Receipts of the Missionary Society of Connecticut, 
in June, Ward W. Jacobs, Treas. 

Berlin, Kensington, by Rev. H. E. Reed.. $5 00 

Bloomfield, by N. F. Miller 14 28 

Bolton, by Rev. Luther H. Barber 13 75 

Eastford, by Joseph D. Barrows, $15.90; 
" The Gleaners," by Alice J. Carpenter, 

$10 25 90 

Fairfield, First, by O. B. Jennings, $50 of 
which by friends, to const. Otto T. Ban- 



nard, of N. Y. City, a L. M $107 65 

Franklin, by Rev. H. E. Hart 16 04 

Glastonbury, Buckingham, by Rev. A. 

Gardner 5 00 

Hartford, Asylum Hill, by C. E. Thomp- 
son, from A Friend 5 00 

Pearl Street, by Dea. G. M. Welch, from 

Dea. W. W. Turner, for A. H. M. S 40 00 

Hebron, Gilead, by Josiah C. Gilbert 36 13 

Lisbon, by Rev. Q. M. Bos worth 9 00 

Meriden, First, by W. H. Catlin 50 00 

Monroe, by Rev. H. M. Hazeltine 49 55 

New Britain, First, by A. N. Lewis 95 00 

New Harford, by J. c. Keach 23 00 

New Haven, First, by F. S. Bradley 117 60 

New London, First, by C. D. Boss, Jr 42 04 

New Milford, by Henry Ives 62 08 

Norwich, Third, by F. W. Carey 15 00 

Plainville, Kev. A. T. Reed 10 00 

Pomfret, Abington, by Mary M. Osgood. . 16 00 

Prospect, by Rev. Wm. H. Phipps 7 26 

Salem, by Rev. Jairus Ordwav, with $27.50 
contributed April 13th, 1887, to const. 
Mrs. Mary S. Brooks, of Salem, Ct., a L. 

M., $24.23; Rev. Jairus Ordway,$10 34 23 

Thomaston, by P. Darrow 30 11 

Union, by M. H. Kinney 7 00 

Vernon, Rockville, Second, by H. L. James 122 63 

Westbrook, by T. D. P03t 33 92 

$993 17 

Receipts of the niinois Home Missionary Society, in 
April and May, Aaron B. Mead, Treas. 

AtKinson $1115 

Banlett 23 95 

Batavia 3 50 

Chicago, New England 30 95 

Leavitt S'reet, Woman's H. M. Union.. 4 59 

Union Park 275 00 

Theol. Sem., Soc. of Inquiry 20 00 

Crete 5350 

Dongola, for Sabba'h services 35 45 

Engiewood, First, "King's Children" 10 00 

Evanston 19 25 

Greenville, special 50 02 

Griggsville, special 119 70 

Huntley, Hon. T. S.Huntley.. 10 00 

King's, speciai 10 00 

La Grange, Woman's H. M. Union 5 00 

La Hatpe, Woman's H. M. Union 6 15 

Lawn K'dge, Adam Crawford 10 00 

Mrs. Elizabeth DeDdron 5 00 

Moline 200 00 

Morrison 26 00 

Neponset 34 00 

Oneida. Miss Jennie V oris 100 

Oswego, special 14 35 

Oitawa 29 32 

Peoria, D. Neednam 20 00 

Peru, special 11 00 

Piano, Young Ladies' M iss. Soc 16 00 

Providence, Woman's H. M. Soc 6 00 

Roberts 14 65 

Rockford, First, Woman's H. M. Union.. 17 50 

Estate of Lewis P. Swezey 500 00 

Int. on above bequest 10 22 

Rockton 12 25 

Rollo 10 15 

itosemond, Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Warner. . . 2 00 

Seward, Wimebago Co 3 00 

Shabbona 59 30 

Stark, " Daughters of the King" 5 00 

stillman Valley 33 54 

Toulon, Woman's H. M. Union 5 to 

"Willing Workers" 15 00 

Ullin, for Sabbath services 21 00 

Victoria, special 3 00 

Wayne 6 16 

Woodburn 14 OS 

VV'yanet 1 00 

Wy oming 5 50 

Wythe 4 20 

$1,752 41 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 

THE DR. JAEGER 

Sanitary Woolen System Company. 

The "Jaeger System" is based upon Scientillc and Sanitary principles as arplied to Clothing 
Its distinctive feature is "ALL WOOL," "ALL THE YEAR ROUND," for "ALL Articles o 
Clothing for Men, Women and Children." 

The goods are comformable to all styles, and are graded to all seasons, and are especially con- 
u Ive to health and comfort during " hot weather." 

The object of Clothing is : decorum, comfort, health. The object of Drees is adornment. The 
ormer appeals to reason and common sense ; the latter to taste, style, fashion. 

A system that meets the requirements of both must be the right one. Such is the Dr. Jaeger's 
anitary Woolen System. "It promises no less than the physical regeneration of mankind," said 
he London Times, when these goods were first introduced into London. 

Catalogues, which may be obtained free, partially describe and illustrate the varied stock of 
he Company, and contain a full price list. 

Dr. Jaeger's Sanitary Woolen System Company, 

L. C. Hopkins, Jno. J. Donaldson, A. L. Taylor, 

Pres't. V.-Pres't. Treas. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL WAREROOMS, 
827 & 829 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 



B ™ Ho™*, {>»» SssTfc/s***: 



THE "MANHATTAN" 

OF IVEW YORK, 

156 and 158 Broadway, 



"All mA tbink all men mortal but themselves," but there is nothing like a spe 
of sickness to shake one's confidence in the stability of his health and the permanency o' 
physical life. We seem somehow to entertain (vaguely, it may be) the idea that 
insurance may be very properly safely deferred until there are premonitions of declining 
health. This is like waiting for a fire to occur iu your neighborhood and then running to 
seek fire insurance when the conflagration is threatening your own house. It is too late 
then to get insurance. The bitter reflection: "It might have been," may then be timely 
enough ; but wishes have no power on that lay to evoke from the ashes the presence of the 
protective policy to restore the property lost by our folly. 

Take insurance on your life wow. The new plan of the Manhattan will not only eoTer 
the contingency of death, but be a saving fund for yourself, to be resorted to in your ad- 
vanced age. 

JAMES M. McLEAN, President. 

J. L. HALSEY, 1st Vice-Prest. H. B. STOKES, 2d Vice-Prest. 
H. Y. WEMPLE, Secretary. S. N, STEBBINS, Actuary. 

AGENTS WANTED. — Active, reliable, and persevering men who desire agencips in tha 
State of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, and Missouri are invited to 
correspond with the company direct. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



HOME 



INSURANCE COMPANY OF NOW YORK, 

Office: No. 119 BROADWAY. 



SIXTY-EIGHTH SEMI-ANNUAL STATEMENT, 
JULY, 1887. 



CASH CAPITAL, $3,000,000 00 

Reserve Premium Fund, ..... 3,108,59600 
Reserve for Unpaid Losses and Accruing- Taxes, 304,419 04 

Net Surplus, . . . . . . 1,442,494 58 



CASH ASSETS, 



$7,855,509 62 



SUMMARY OF ASSETS: 



Cash in Banks, ..... 

Bonds and Mortgages, being first lien on Eeal Estate, 

United States Stocks (market value), 

Bank and Eailroad Stocks and Bonds (market value), 

State and City Bonds (market value), 

Loans on Stocks, payable on demand, 

Interest due on 1st July, 1887, 

Premiums uncollected and in bands of Agents, 

Eeal Estate, . . . 



Total, 



$91,685 16 

614,450 00 

2,567,000 00 

1,811,650 00 

226,000 00 

848,400 00 

. 33,587 32 

281,955 86 

. 1,380,781 28 

$7,855,509 62 



T 'B..GREENE, CHAS. J. MARTIN, President, 

W. L. BIGELOW, > Asst't See's. D. A. HEALD, Vice-President, 

E. G. SNOW, Jr., I J. H. WASHBURN, V. Pres't & Sec'y 

A Dividend of Five per cent, hasten declare! payable oil demand 

New Yoek, July 12, 1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



THE 



UNITED STATES 

Life Insurance Company, 

I1V THE CITY OE NEW YOIfcK. 

(Organized in 1850.) 

261, 262 and 263 BROADWAY 



New York, 



OEO. H. BURFORD, President. 
C I*. FRALEIGH, Secretary. 

A. WHEELWRIGHT, Ass't See. 



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after three years. 

Death Claims paid at once as soon as satisfactory proofs are 
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the popularity and success of this Company. 



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NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS. 

All letters, orders or communications in 
reference to advertising in The Home Mis- 
sionary, should be addressed to H. S. 
Chandler, Advertising Manager, No. 251 
Broadway, New York. 



BRADFORD ACADEMY, 

An Institution for the Higher Education of Young Women. 
BRADFORD, MASS. 



INCORPORATED 1804. 




CALENDAR. 



The year 1887-88 closes with public anniversary, June 20, 1887. 
THE YEAR 1SS7-88. 



First Term opens, 
Second Term opens, 
Third Term opens, 



Tuesday, September 6, 1887. 

Tuesday, December 6, 1887. 

Tuesday, March 20, 1SS8. 



First Term closes, 
Second Term closes, 
Third Term closes, 



Monday, December 5, 18S7. 

Friday, March 2, 1888- 

Wednesday, June 20, 1888. 



Recess at Christmas time. 



The academic year closes on the last Wednesday but one in June, and consists of three terms. 
The year 1887-8i will commence on the first Tuesday in September. 

EXPENSES. 

BOARD, including; washing, fuel, and lights. 

First Term $90.00 

Second Term 90.00 

Third Term 90.00 

Tuition, including English branches, Latin and French, Greek or German, and 

Vocal Music in Classes ($20 per term), for the year GO. 00 



Total expenses for the year $330.00 



Special terms to daughters of Missionaries and Clergymen. 

No extras except the following : — 

Tuition in Music and Art: Instruction on Piano, per term, $20.00 to $40.00. Use of Piano one hour 
a day, per term, $3.00. Instruction in Art, including Linear and Perspectve Drawing, and Painting, 
according to the ability of the pupil, per term, $10.00. 

In case of failure after an engagement has been made, information should be given immediately. 
Application may be made to 

J. D. KINGSBURY, Treasurer, Bradford, Mass. 



TUB HOME MISSIONARY. 

This Monthly is furnished at sixty cents a year, postage paid. The subscription price 
could not well be less. Its whole present issue should go to actual subscribers. But, unless they 
prefer to pay, it will be sent free, as heretofore, to Life Directors and Life Members ; Mis- 
sionaries of the Society and its Auxiliaries ; Ministers securing a yearly collection for it in 
their congregations ; also, to every individual, Association, or Congregation, one copy for 
every ten dollars collected and paid over to the Society or an Auxiliary. Suitable name 
should accompany the payment. Pastors are earnestly requested to serve Home Missions by 
promoting the use of this Journal at the Monthly Concert and among their people. 

Immediate notice of the discontinuance or change of post-office address should be given. 

APPLICATIONS FOR A1I>. 

Congregations desiring aid should apply at once after finding a minister. They should 
make a full statement of the facts in their condition and prospects which justify an applica- 
tion. They should also give these particulars, viz. : 

Population of the place. 

Names of the church or churches, and preaching stations 

Number of church-members. 

Average of congregation. 

Denomination and size of contiguous congregations. 

Names and distances of the nesrest Congregational churches. 

Minister's full name and post-office address : Town, County, State 

Does he reside on his field of labor? Is he installed pastor? 

Has he any other calling than that of the ministry? 

Of what local church is he a member? 

Of what Ministerial Association ? 

The number of persons composing his family. 

Total amount of salary proposed. 

Amount pledged by the people and how secured. 

Has he, also, the use .of a parsonage ? 

Is aid expected from any other source ? 

The least amount that will suffice from the A. H. M. 8. 

The amount received from this Society last year. 

Will less probably be needed next year? 

Amount contributed to this Society last year. How raised. 

Amount contributed to other benevolent societies. 

Additional statements concerning the condition, prospects, and wants of the field. 

Date of the desired commission. 

The application must be signed by the officers of the church, where there is one, and by 
the trustees or a committee of the congregation. 

If the ecclesiastical body, within whose limits the congregation is found, has a "Com- 
mittee of Missions," the members ol that committee should certify these statements, the stand- 
ing of the minister, his prospects of usefulness there, and indorse the application. If no 
such "Committee of Missions " exists, the application should be indorsed by two or more 
neighboring clergymen acquainted with the facts. If no church or congregation is yet 
athered, applicants will follow the same course, as far as practicable. 

Applications, after being so indorsed, should be sent to the Superintendent (or Secretary 
of the Auxiliary) for the region where the applicants reside. 

Appropriations, as a rule, bear the date of a punctual application ; and they never cover 
more than one year. If further aid be needed, a new application is required, containing al 
the particulars named above, and indorsed as before. To this the certificate of the missionary 
thai the congregation has fulfilled Us previous pledges for his support, must be added. 

For the address of Superintendents and Secretaries of Auxiliaries, see p. 4 of cover. 

FORM OF A BEQUEST. 

I bequeath to my executors the sum of dollars, in trtlSt, to pay over the same 

after my decease, to the person who, when the same is payable, shall act 

as Treasurer of the American Home Missionary Society, formed in the City of New York, in 

the year eighteen hundred and twenty-six, to be applied to the charitable uses and purposes 

of said Society, and under its direction. 



A.TJGTCJST, 



1887. 



AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 

Bible House, Astor Place, New York. 



Ret. DAVID B. COE, D.D., Honorary Secretary. 

Rev. WALTER M. BAKROWS, D.D.,) , . - ^ . 

Rev. JOSEPH B. CLARK, D. D., } Secretary for Correspondence. 

Rev. ALEX'R H. CLAPP, D.D., Treasurer. 
Executive Committee :— Mb. JOHN WILEY, Chairman; Mr. WM. HENRY SMITH ; Rev. WM. M 
TAYLOR, D.D.; MR. CHARLES' H. PARSONS; Mr. ALFRED S. BARNES: MR. ALBERT WOODRUPF:j 
GEO. P. SHELDON, Esq.; Rev. JAMES G. ROBERTS, D.D.; Rev. SAMUEL H. VIRGIN, D.D.; MB. 
HEKBEKT M. DIXON; Rev. A. J. P. BEHRENDS, D.D. : REV. ROBERT R. MEREDITH, D.D.; Mb. 
FRANCIS FLINT; WM. IVES WASHBURN, ESQ., Recording Sec. 

COMMUNICATIONS 

delating to the general business of the Society may be addressed to either of the Secretaries for 

Correspondence, 
.'ommunications relating to the Woman's Department may be addressed to 

Mrs. H. M. Shelton, Bible House. N. Y. 
ommunications relating to the Editorial Department of The Home Missionary, may be addressed to 

Mrs. H. S. Caswell, Bible House, N. Y. 



DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS, 

In Drafts, Checks, Registered Letters, or Post- Office Orders; also Communications relating to the 
business matters of The Home Missionary and other Publications of the Society, may be ad- 
dressed to Alex'r H. Clapf, Tieafcnrer, Bible House, Astor Place, New York. 

Post-Offlce Orders feboult! be drawn on .STATION D, New York City. 

A Payment of $50 constitutes a Life Member. 

SUPERINTENDENTS. 

Rev. Henry A. Schauffler, Work among Bohemians. Poles, etc., Cleveland, O. 



Rev. Moritz E. Eversz, Work among Germans 
Rev. M. W. Montgomery, Work among Scandin 



Rev. Leroy Warren, 
Rev. Edw. D. Curtis, 
Rev. S. F. Gale, 
Rev. J. H. Morley, 
Rev. Franklin B. Doe, 
Rev. Addison Blanchabd, 

Rev. C. C. Otis. 



Lansing. Mich. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Topeka, Kan. 

N. Mex. 

Seattle, Wash. Ter.- 



Chicago. 111. 

avians, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Rev. John L. Maile. 
Rev. Hiram D. Wiard, 
Rev. H. C. Simmons, 
Rev. C. M. Sanders, 
Rev. W. S Hawkes, 
J. H. Warren, D.D., 
G. H. Atkinson, D.D., 
Rev. Geo. A. Hood, 



Omaha, Neb. 

Mitchell, Dak. 

Fargo, No. Dak. 

Denver, Col. 

8alt Lake City, Utah. 

San Francisco, GaL 

Portland. Or. 

Ashland, Wis. 



SECRETARIES 
oe THE 

Rev. Jonathan E. Adams, Secretary, 

John L. Crosby, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev. Edwabd H. Greeley, D.D., Secretary, 

Hon. Lyman D. Stevens, Treasurer, 

Rev. Charles S. Smith, Secretary, 

J. C. Emery, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev. Joshua Coit, Secretary, 

Rev. Edwin B. Palmer, Treasurer, 

Edwin Babrows, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev. William H. Moobe, Secretary, 

Wabd W. Jacobs, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev. Charles C. Creegan, D.D., Secretary, 

Alex'r H. Clapp, Treasurer, 

Rev. J. G. Fraseb, Secretary, 

Alex'r H. Clapp, Treasurer, 

Rev. James- Tompkins, Secretary, 

Aaron B. Mead, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev. T. G. Grassie. Secretary, 

R. A. McCollough, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev. T. O. Douglass, Secretary, 

J. H.;Merrill, Esq., Treasurer, 



AND TREASURERS 

AUXILIARIES. 

Maine Miss. Soc, 

jV. Hamp. Home Miss. Soc, 

Vermont Bom. " 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, \ 
" i 
Rhode IsVd " « 

<( a *i 

Miss. Soc. of Conn., 

New Yot k H. M. Soc, 
<< !■■ 

Ohio ' " 

a a 

' Illinois " 

a «< 

Wis. " 

(i >i 

Iowa " 



Bangor, Me. 
Bangor, Me. 
, Concord, N. H. 
Concord, N. H. 
Montpelier, Vt. 
Montpelier, Vt. 
22 Cong. House, 
Boston Mass. 

Providence, R. I. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
New York City. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
New York City. 
151 Washington 
St., Chicago, lrl. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Grinnell, la. 
Des Moines, la, 




r mu&s- (y^x 



vz/O^ 





THE 



Home Missionary. 



BEPTEMB&H, l£**»*r. 



CONTENTS. 



BHETREASURY 201 

■RENCH EVANGELIZATION 201 

THE SARATOGA MEETING 208 

HOW RICH MAY A CHRISTIAN BE- 

£ COME ? 210 

SCHOOL FOR BOHEMIAN BIBLE 
HEADERS 211 

an inevitable conflict 214 

Southern California 214 

a kansas pastor visits geor- 
GIA 21T 

FRUIT.— II 218 

FROM A NORWEGIAN STUDENT.. 219 

SELF-SUPPORT 220 

HIS LAST CIGAR 221 

PUBLICATIONS OF THE A. H. M. S.. 221 

WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT 223 

Burden-Bearers, There and Here 223 



A Word from Wisconsin 228 

" Loy and Gee." 227 

From a Nebraska Lady 227 

OUR YOUNG PEOPLE 228 

Letter No. 10 228 

Questions 230 

Join Huss 230 

Ca .i You Make It Out ? 231 

The Work at Hand. -IV . 232 

AMERICAN COLLEGE AND EDUCA- 

TI )N SOCIETY 233 

Whitman College 233 

CHILDREN'S BOHEMIAN FUND.... 234 
WOMAN'S FUND FOR MISSIONARY 

SALARIES 234 

MISSIONARY BOXES 234 

MISSIONARY APPOINTMENTS 235 

RECEIPTS 236 



Vol. LX, No. 5. 



NEW YORK. 
AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Bible House, Astos Place. 



SIXTY CENTS A TEAR, IN ADVANCE, POSTAGE PAID. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 

Go Pbeace the Gospel Mark xvi. 15. 

How shall they preach except they be sent ? Rom. x. 15. 

VOL. LX. SEPTEMBER, 1887. No. 5. 



THE TREASURY. 

The only thing- to be said of the Treasury is to repeat the story of 
last month — as to its emptiness — and to remind our careful friends 
that there are still before us weeks and weeks of the dry season in 
which, ordinarily, little relief is to be hoped for. 

The receipts in July were about $16,250 ; in the four months of 
the fiscal year now past, about $73,800. Here is a gain, over the same 
months of last year, of nearly $7,600 in the gifts of the living, and a 
loss in legacies of about $6,600. Of course, there has been but one 
thing to do in obedience to the emphatic directions of the Society at 
the Saratoga meeting : To borrow money at the banks and pay the 
missionaries' dues. We have borrowed, for this purpose, $50,000 on 
the churches' credit ; must very soon borrow $10,000 more ; and before 
the autumnal rains inuSt several times repeat that process. We men- 
tion it, to keep up the habit of entire frankness with our constituency, 
and to make sure that such of the churches and friends as cannot as well 
or better remit at once will be prepared to fulfill their pledges as soon 
as may be after coming together in the fall. We trust that the debt 
incurred by their order will not be allowed so to drag along that the 
Executive Committee and officers shall be unable to act intelligently 
upon the applications for aid and other matters that come before the 
successive semi-monthly meetings, leaving the workers uncertain of 
their continuance in the service. A word to the wise — those as wise 
as are the great body of the friends of Home Missions — should be suf- 
ficient, on a point so plain as this. 

Postscript. — That same kind and generous New York business 
man has been in again and added $2,100 to the $1,400 reported in 
last month's postscript, making $3,500 from him within a month or so. 
This pays the Society's appropriation to eight selected missionaries, to 
be kept at their work at the front, for a year, by one man's noble 
offerings ! 

We repeat the closing question of last month : Is there not here a 
hint on which other liberal men might act with profit to themselves 
and the cause ? Who is ready now ? 



202 the home missionary. September, 

Erratum. — By an oversight the reports on the Secretaries' papers, 
in the August number of The Home Missionary, were subscribed 
by only two names of each of the Committees. To the report on Sec- 
retary Clark's paper should have been added the names of Wm. F. 
Whittemore, Francis C. Sessions and David N. Camp. To the report 
on Secretary Barrows's paper should have been added the names of 
George W. Phillips, George R. Merrill and Amos C. Barstow. 

On the Sabbath during which Rev. F. S. Buckingham, of Bridge- 
port, Conn., presented the subject of Home Missions to his people, he 
doubled their regular contributions by a free distribution in the pews 
of the recent publications of the Society. 

This from Kansas. — The Young Ladies' Missionary Society of Law- 
rence, Kan., request that the money they place in the home missionary 
treasury this year be applied to the salary of the home missionary 
pastor at Jetmore, Kan., because he asked for " the hardest place on 
the frontier, where there were souls to be saved.'' He is caring for 
two churches, faithfully visiting families " in claims," holding services 
in the jail, and looking after out-stations. 

The post-office at Cresbard, Dak., was burned last week, and every- 
thing was consumed. Rev. E. H. Carleton, having learned, that through 
the kind thought of some friend, a book and magazine for him was 
destroyed, desires to express his thanks to this unknown friend. The 
cheering message comes to us by the same mail that a great spiritual 
blessing has recently come to his people in Myron. Everybody in the 
community save two has united with his church, and these two will 
join at the next communion. 

From Superintendent Simmons of North Dakota. — I expect to-day 
it will be decided that our college is to be located in Fargo. It has 
taken a great deal of hard work to bring the matter where it now is, 
but I trust we are to see grow up, on foundations now being laid, an 
institution of Christian Education of great value to the extension of 
Christ's kingdom in all this region. We walk by faith and not by 
sight in these things. I am more and more led to pray, " Lord, in- 
crease our faith !" 

At the spring meeting of the Black Hills Association of Congrega- 
tional churches and ministers, held at Buffalo Gap, Dak., June 22d and 
23d, 1887, the following was heartily adopted: 

Whereas, We have heard with profound interest and gratitude of 
the meeting of our Home Missionary Society at Saratoga, and are more 
than ever convinced of the commanding importance of the work of that 
Society, 

Resolved, That we pledge anew to it our loyalty and co-operation, 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 203 

ami we will make strenuous efforts to secure a contribution from every 
member of our churches during the coming year ; such offerings to be 
not less than fifty cents per member. — George Jielsey, Scribe. 

Our circumstances render these gifts from eastern friends doubly 
precious. Our little church is surrounded by Germans. American set- 
tlers are selling out and leaviug as fast as they can, but, through their 
children, the Germans draw nearer to us, and we reach them more 
easily. Their subscriptions to the pastors salary are increasing"; their 
children are becoming more active and more interested in our church 
matters, and in contributions to home and foreign missions. Indeed, 
our,* work could most appropriately come under the care of the Amer- 
ican Board so rapid is the shifting from the native to the foreign ele- 
ment. We hope and pray for its success, not without evidences of some 
success already. — Rev. F. Lawson, Durante Iowa. 

Kev. B. M. Hughes, Shamokin, Pa., has recently canvassed his little 
flock with a subscription paper for the A. H. M. S. Of the $106 
secured, the majority contributed twenty-five and fifty cents each; 
twenty-five people contributed one dollar each ; six people two dollars, 
and two people five dollars. Only one man, and he evidently of Welsh 
descent, contributed a sum larger than those mentioned. This effort 
on the part of one brother has not only placed over one hundred dollars 
in our treasury, but it has done more. It has secured the prayerful 
interest of each contributor, and stimulated all to seek information 
upon the work of a Society which has now become their agent for 
planting the gospel standard in every neglected place upon this con- 
tinent. 

Rev. Thomas Marsh, formerly of Fort Collins, Col., has moved to 
Wallace, Kan., and while tendering thanks to the kind friends who 
have been sending him their weekly or monthly papers and magazines, 
would be glad to receive them at his new address. Arriving at his new 
field he writes: "We are here, but scarce know which way to turn. 
This excessively hot weather is very debilitating to us who have just 
come down from the mountains. Day after day, for one week, we have 
been trying to get a house to live in. Four of us are stowed away in 
one small room, in which I am now writing, while sitting upon a trunk 
and using a chair for a table. This is a new town, but a little band of 
disciples here want a church and we hope to go right on, and with 
God's blessing, soon erect a church home. Last Sabbath morning, hot 
as it was, over 100 came to the Sunday-school, 150 attended the morn- 
ing service, and 200 were present in the evening. Our Lord has 
'already permitted me the joy of some results from the preaching of the 
Word here. - ' 



204 the home missionary. September, 



FRENCH EVANGELIZATION.* 

ADDRESS OF REV. C. E. AMERON, MASSACHUSETTS. 

French- Canadian evangelization must become one of the absorbing 
schemes of the churches, if New England is to keep its place among the 
nations of the earth as a center of Christian and missionary influences. 

As nearly as can be estimated there are about 1,000,000 French- 
speaking people in the United States. Of these, 300,000 are in New 
England and about 175,000 in Massachusetts. About 10,000 may be 
said to be Protestant, or so inclined, requiring the means of grace in* a 
tongue they can understand, else they will go back to Romish errors, 
or, worse still, drift into infidelity. About 40,000 may be said to be 
out of Rome's reach, rapidly swelling the ranks of socialists and an- 
archists, and preparing for a second French Revolution, and the rest are 
under that system of religion which for over three centuries has op- 
pressed them in Canada and proved itself absolutely inadequate to 
make of them a great and prosperous nation. 

The rapid tide of immigration has materially changed the complexion 
of your Puritan States. That it is destined to continue, no man who 
studies the state of things in the Province of Quebec can for a moment 
doubt. Attempts at repatriation have failed, efforts to prevent immi- 
gration have proved futile. The Romish priests are therefore urging 
the French Catholics to buy up New England soil, to become citizens, 
but not with the view of assimilating with the American people, but in 
the expectation of changing New England into New France, and of per- 
petuating the customs, habits, manners, religion, and in fact the tradi- 
tions of French Roman Catholic Canada. These aims they hope to 
reach by mea^as of the French Catholic press, the establishment all over 
the land of separate French Catholic schools, which they shall ask the 
State to subsidize, and the establishment of a French Catholic college. 

We, as French Protestants, deem it our duty to make known to the 
Christian public of this land some of the aims and plans of the Romish 
hierarchy. Knowing only too well what that system has done or failed 
to do for our countrymen, we believe that we are loyal American citi- 
zens, true French Canadian patriots, and faithful disciples of Christ, 
when we ask the Christians of New England and of the land to help us 
destroy this heresy of too long standing, that the Church of Rome is 
but one of the Christian denominations of the land working in harmony 
with, the others for the upbuilding of the nation. 

Sir, the Church of Rome, de facto is the implacable foe of the grand, 
ree institutions which are to-day the glory of this great nation. Its 
* Delivered at the Annual Meeting at Saratoga, June, 1887. 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 205 

spirit, its doctrines, political and religious, are diametrically opposed to 
the very Constitution of the United States. 

REASONS FOR TAKING UP THIS WORK. 

1. As French Canadians we have reason to put ourselves with 
Rome. For centuries she has had the fashioning of our nation. At the 
outset of the French Colony this church had large grants for the sup- 
port of education and religion, and the most valuable portions of the 
country were given her. She should have made of my people one of the 
first nations on this continent in commercial, intellectual and moral 
greatness. See her lamentable failure. See Protestant New England 
opening her arms to thousands of French coming from Canada, that 
rich and beautiful country, with its magnificent rivers, its unequaled 
water-powers, and its inexhaustible mines and forests. Why the differ- 
ence? Because you have been true to the great principles of God's 
Word and of the great reformers, whilst the Canadian has followed 
Rome's errors. Surely the backbone of New England is not so broken 
as to make it necessary, in an assembly of this character to spend time 
to prove that Romanism is not gospel truth in most of its teachings? 
Unless the Christian churches of our land are foresworn and its mem- 
bers traitors to their God and Savior Jesus Christ, they will help us to 
make the light shine through this thick cloud of error. 

2. We affirm, in the second place, that what New England is to be 
and is to do must, in the nature of things, depend on what is done for 
the evangelization of the French and Irish Catholics. It were unsafe, 
it were unpatriotic for you to look upon this steady growth with indif- 
ference. You can't continue to be much longer the feeder for the great 
missionary enterprises at home and abroad unless there be an awak- 
ening. 

We are often asked why so many Canadians come here and if this 
immigration has not reached its height. We answer that so long as the 
Church of Rome continues to oppress the people as she now does, the 
people must leave. And everything tends to prove that her require- 
ments are more burdensome each year. She will continue to exact from 
the farmers her annual tithe of the twenty sixth bushel of grain, which 
means an annual income of $-4,000,000. She will not modify her com- 
pulsory system of pew rents which adds another $4,000,000. She will 
continue to avail herself of the old French laws which give her a right 
to tax and assess the people, to erect her huge palaces and churches 
which you see side by side with the miserable huts of the poor. Those 
who have studied these questions assure us that like a huge sponge she 
sucks up $40,000,000 annually from a people numbering about 2,500,- 
000. The results are clear. The wealth is all in the hands of the 
clergy, and with it they control the legislatures, and the people must 
be poor and must emigrate by thousands to live. 



206 the home missionaky. September, 

Each year the number is increased by propagation at an extraordi- 
nary rate, families of ten and twelve children being the rule, while your 
New England homes are not overflowing with children. Your sons 
are going west to be replaced by those, who, inspired by their clergy, 
pledge themselves to remain true to their motto : " Our tongue, our 
nationality and our religion." 

These are some of the stubborn facts which confront you intelligent 
Christians of New England. What are you going to do ? Eaise the 
anti-Chinese cry ? No ! you have too much religion. You are going to 
open your hearts and purses and help us to restore to the French the 
Word of God. And this you will do all the more readily in view of the 
immense benefits which you owe to that immortal Frenchman, John 
Calvin. 

3. And yet another reason must be added to these. Let us not 
be so unwise as to imagine that the existing agencies, the public 
schools with no Bible, the American churches and the spirit of freedom 
which prevails, will suffice to solve this most serious problem, and con- 
vert to Christ this population. Have these agencies prevented thou- 
sands of your people from lapsing into carelessness and sin ! Can it 
be imagined that the French will be saved by being left alone ? No. 

Well, many Christians have said, " Leave them in the Church of 
Borne." To this we retort, "You can't do that unless you make up your 
mind to help Borne to maintain herself and build herself." And how 
can the Bomish hierarchy hold her own and grow on American soil? 
By removing that which checks its growth and threatens its existence. 
And what are these obstacles? Brotestantism, called heresy; liberty 
of speech and conscience; the free public school system; the Constitu- 
tion of this Bepublic. Are you prepared to sweep all these out of the 
way to accommodate Borne ? I scarcely think so. And yet you know 
that because she wants to live and grow here, and can't side by side 
with your institutions, she is doing all she can to destroy or, at any 
rate neutralize what militates against her growth. And she is succeed- 
ing fairly well, especially in New York. 

But let it be granted that she will fail in her endeavors to obtain 
anything like the power she covets ; let it be granted that she will 
sooner or later succumb, will her collapse mean the strengthening of 
evangelical Brotestantism ? By no means. The French revolutionists 
swore an eternal hatred to Bomish priests and massacred scores of 
them. But was that religion? Is there much religion in the socialist 
and anarchist of Chicago ? Borne admits having lost millions of her 
people in the Bepublic? But where are they? You have helped to 
destroy the only phase of faith they knew, and shall you not replace it 
by something better? The French Canadians are fast drifting from 
Borne and ere long they will be at the head in the rank and file of the 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY 207 

strikers who will upset New England and cause it the loss of millions 
of dollars. 

Now is the time to reach them ; doors are open. But to do this im- 
mense work we have but five regular missionaries. We need ten times 
that number, and we need men peculiarly gifted, and we do not know 
where to get them. Not only this, but we have not the material out 
of which to make them. Where will we find our future Sunday-school 
teachers, deacons, missionaries and regular pastors ? But one answer 
could suggest itself. You must create or prepare them. It was to 
meet this and kindred wants that the French Protestant College of 
Lowell was established. For two years it has given a Christian edu- 
cation to forty-six boys and young men who have been with us a part 
or the whole of the time. Last fall over fifty sought admission and we 
had to turn away nearly half that number for want of room and funds, 
and several of them were Catholics. 

Men of New England, can it be true that in view of the facts just 
stated you will be indifferent to our appeal ! We ask you to help us to 
rebuild the moral and intellectual wrecks Rome has made and is mak- 
ing ; to help us to educate a people in whom the very taste and ambi- 
tion for education is being destroyed. We ask you especially to give 
us such an equipment that we may give to the scores of young people 
who knock at our door a Christian education in view of their conver- 
sion to Christ. Many intelligent and educated young Frenchmen whom 
we could enlist in our work are now on the border line between Ro- 
manism and infidelity, just in that state of mind which fits them to 
accept the negations of the latter. Place them in the non-religious 
colleges of the land, where the Bible is an unknown book, and they are 
lost to the church and to God. But give each year to one hundred 
French young people, bright and intelligent, a true Christian educa- 
tion, as you used to give in the palmy days of New England, and you 
raise a class of strong, brave men who will soon leaven the whole French 
community. 

We need at once $15,000 to erect a building during the summer 
months, that our work may not be interrupted. Surely we will not be 
obliged to say to fifty or more young people who are already knocking 
at our door : " We can't receive you. Stay out in the cold. Run your 
chances, drift on the sea of indifference and irreligion, then go down 
the swift rapids of infidelity and immorality, swell the tide of the un- 
churched, of socialists and anarchists, and go devastate this fair heritage 
of New England."' Then this Christian land will be compelled to give 
out its money to protect itself and rebuild the ruins of irreligion and 
lawlessness. With the stubborn facts of history before our mind's eye, 
with the bloody scenes of the French Revolution and the labor troubles 
of our own country before us, we cannot trifle with the future. Let us 
bs up and doinj. 



■ 
208 the home missionary. September, 

THE SARATOGA MEETING. 

HOW IT STRUCK ONE WESTERN MAN. 
BY J. G. HASKELL. 

Twenty-five or thirty years ago the following outline embraced the 
most important features of the work of the American Home Missionary 
Society. 

1st. To provide gospel privileges for destitute localities on the 
frontier. 

2d. To extend assistance to feeble churches in new settlements. 

3d. To aid in the formation of new churches. 

At present all these constitute but a single branch of the work of 
the Society, for there has been added, (a) work among the foreign pop- 
ulation, and (b) special evangelical work in the large cities. Nor is this 
all, for those who formerly contributed to the single line of frontier 
work above outlined, are not only called upon for the original work 
and these added purposes above noted, but also to support four addi- 
tional organizations to from time to time perform other branches of 
home mission work. These are the American Missionary Association, 
the New West Commission, the Sunday-school and Publication So- 
ciety, and the Congregational Union. 

It will be seen, therefore, that while there is no rivalry among the 
various interests above noted, there is opportunity for great diversity 
of opinion as to which is most important. Those of us who live in the 
West are sure that no interests can excel in importance those attached 
to the proper shaping of religious sentiment in the new and growing 
states, counties and cities at present being so rapidly populated west 
of the Mississippi River. Those nearer to other great interests sym- 
pathize with that which impresses them most. 

This late anniversary of the American Home Missionary Society at 
Saratoga represented in greater or less degree all these lines of Chris- 
tian effort. 

1st. The work on the frontier, including not only the support of 
missionaries, but the erection of churches and parsonages, and the 
establishment of Sunday-schools. 

2d. The work among the foreign population ; notably the Bo- 
hemians, Poles, Scandinavians, Germans and French. 

'id. The work of city evangelization. 

4th. The work among the Freedmen. 

5th. The work in Utah and elsewhere by the New West Com- 
mission. 

Not all these were upon the platform, but all had friends pres- 



1887. THE HOME MI8SIONAKY. 209 

ent who were pronounced and intelligent. When the superin- 
tendents of missions in the various states and territories, and 
the representatives of the Sunday-school and church building in- 
terests had the floor it looked as if our great frontier work was safe. 
But when the eloquent men who presented the city and foreign 
work claimed attention, it was clear that they made an impression, and 
bore away their share of earnest sympathy. Dr. Strong held up to 
view the great dangers in our large cities and Dr. Abbott the great 
opportunities. As if God in his providence had allowed to be imported 
to our shores, and massed together in our cities, a population for us to 
teach and care for. And then came Dr. Schauffler in behalf of the Bo- 
hemians and Poles, and Rev. Mr. Ameron, of Massachusetts, in behalf 
of the French, each eloquently setting forth his work, till it was quite 
clear that the audience had much to think of in addition to the old- 
fashioned — a generation ago — claims of the frontier. Then came the 
sharp, close questions of the members of the Executive Committee and 
representatives of Auxiliary societies of which the following are 
samples : 

1st. How is it that churches which have been on the books of the 
Society for ten, fifteen and twenty years, and around which flourishing 
towns have grown, are yet not self-supporting ? 

2d. Are there not some churches which might support themselves if 
they would? 

3d. Are there not some which never will be self-supporting and 
which are not in otherwise destitute localities, so that they might as 
well be cut off one time as another ? 

To me the lessons from all this were quite clear and hardly need 
stating, but since they can be stated briefly they may as well be — at least 
in part. The frontier no longer monopolizes the attention of the mass of 
eastern givers. Not that there is indifference or loss of interest, for 
they are proud of the great and growing West. But there is an ad- 
vancing pressure for work in other directions. There is a feeling that 
while the western churches show gains in membership and contribu- 
tions they do not keep pace in these respects with the growth of the 
country where the work is done. There is a feeling that a larger number 
of western churches ought to be helpers in the great work instead of 
being dependent. There was manifested a feeling that pastors do 
not urge their churches to independence as successfully as they might. 
The general tone of the meetings suggested wide outlooks, national 
views, progress, vigilance in administration, unity in all departments of 
work, compactness among friends, consecration to the task at hand. 

The West is not to be neglected, neither is it to be coddled. 
Throughout the field of home mission effort in the West or East, in the 
South or in Utah, in the cities and with those among us from foreign 



210 the home missionary. September, 

lands, each department and detail must stand on its right to live and 
be heard. If it has rights it must show what they are ; if it has none 
it must go. Work that does not bear both business and spiritual tests 
must step aside for such as does bear such tests. The whole west- 
ern side of Home Mission work was not presented, not because shut 
out, but because the West was not there and prepared to show cause. 

The meeting next year will far exceed the late meeting both in mag- 
nitude and interest; and the great questions as to the best way to make 
and keep this continent thoroughly Christian will be considered. If 
the western home mission churches have a case to present they will 
be heard. I believe they are not fully understood, but ought to be. 

It is quite clear, therefore, that our missionary work must not only 
be such as to commend itself to the wisest business judgment of the 
givers, but also it must be presented in such manner as that its mag- 
nitude and importance is not overshadowed by other necessities no 
matter how pressing. We all gladly acknowledge the value of other 
departments of Christian effort, but must not expect our own to be 
considered as fully as it deserves unless excellent in quality and fully 
understood. — The Kansas Telephone. 



HOW EICH MAY A CHRISTIAN BECOME? 

A Christian lady recently died who is said to have left a property 
amounting to from fifteen to thirty millions of dollars. Being a single 
woman she had the use of it all for herself. Yet she was characterized 
by her benevolence, doing much good with her means while she lived, 
and at her death leaving much of her wealth for useful purposes. 

But the question properly arises : How rich is it right for a disciple 
of the Lord Jesus Christ to become % What amount of wealth is it 
consistent for him to accumulate ? Doubtless it would be difficult to 
prescribe any definite limits. What might be right and proper for one 
person might not be so for another. A Christian in business may be 
allowed to accumulate and to retain so much as may be needful to 
carry on his business to the best advantage, always making it his su- 
preme aim to acquire means for doing a greater amount of good. But 
beyond this, accumulation is questionable. It is questionable whether 
in these days it is right and proper for a Christian to accumulate mil- 
lions of unused money. The demands for that money are great and 
urgent. The calls for it are many and loud. The treasury of the Lord 
is but scantily filled, whilst it should be full to overflowing. Millions 
are needed where but thousands and hundreds are supplied. During 
all the years that those millions, to which we have alluded, have been 
treasured up, they might have been going about doing good. The loss 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 211 

that has thus been sustained can never bo known in this world. Had 
they been cast into the treasury of the Lord how many missionaries, 
both home and foreign, might have beeu sent forth into the broad and 
needy fields of the world, and how many benevolent causes might have 
been aided ? It becomes those Christians that have in their possession 
treasured wealth seriously to inquire whether the Lord has not present 
need of it. — Massachusetts. 



SCHOOL FOR BOHEMIAN BIBLE READERS. 

BY REV. H. A. SCHAUFFLER, SUPERINTENDENT OF THE SLAVONIC DEPARTMENT. 

Why is the work among the Bohemians and Poles so much more 
difficult than that commenced at the same time by the American Home 
Missionary Society among the Germans and Scandinavians ? Because 
the two former nationalities have been greatly injured, both so- 
cially and morally, by the influence of the Papacy, and be- 
cause we had, at the commencement, absolutely nobody who 
could speak their language and do missionary work among 
them. We had to begin at the very foundation nearly five years 
ago. It was very manifest that we could never succeed in evangelizing 
our Slavic population without missionary workers raised up from 
amongst them, who could speak their language and work for them as 
no one else can. Without accomplishing this, we might as well give 
up the work. You will be glad to know that we are solving this prob- 
lem successfully; and the object I have in writing to you now is, to 
bring to your notice what we are doing to fit young women for this 
work as Bible readers. 

Allow me to give you the facts. In the fall of 1885 I felt so deeply the 
urgent need of missionary work for Bohemian and Polish women and 
children, which can be done best only by trained Christian women, 
that, though not knowing where to look for the means, which the 
American Home Missionary Society was not able to furnish, I invited 
Miss Clara Hobart, a public school teacher of great experience and suc- 
cess, to join this mission, learn the Bohemian language, and train young 
women of piety and intelligence, as Bible readers. In January, 1886, she 
accepted my invitation, but still I did not know where her support was 
to come from. Just then Mrs. Dr. McEwen, of New London, surprised 
and delighted me with an unsolicited gift of over three hundred dollars. 
This amount the American Home Missionary Society agreed to supple- 
ment, thus insuring Miss Hobart's salary for one year. She commenced 
work immediately and had at once a most excellent Bohemian 
young lady (a successful Sunday-school teacher in our Bohe- 
mian mission school) as a pupil. Since then a very promising 
Bohemian young lady from St. Paul and another from Bruenn, 



212 the home missionary. September, 

Austria — converted in the "Home" which my wife and I started 
while missionaries there — have joined the Bible Eeaders' School. We 
are greatly pleased with their spirit and their zeal in missionary 
work, and what was commenced as an experiment a year ago last 
January has already proved a most gratifying success. I have juet in- 
vited two more promising pious Bohemian girls, whom I found on a 
farm in Wisconsin, to join the Bible Readers' School next fall. 

Another young lady, an American from Iowa City, who has for 
many years conducted a Sunday-school for Bohemian children in 
her own home, is about to join Miss Hobart ; she will learn 
Bohemian and give herself entirely to the work. Another Amer- 
ican lady, a school teacher and an admirable mission-school worker, is 
so deeply interested in the Bohemians around her home, in East Cleve- 
land, that she refused an offer to devote herself entirely to English 
mission work elsewhere, and determined to learn Bohemian, though 
fully occupied as a public school teacher. Last spring she accepted the 
invitation of the A. H. M. S. to give up her public school work and 
devote herself entirely to mission work for Bohemians. 

If we had the means and a suitable home, in which they could live 
while fitting for the work, other American ladies would doubtless be 
found to devote themselves to it. We need Americans, too, both because 
the supply of Bohemians and Poles is much too small at present, and 
because American workers will furnish the needed bond of union be- 
tween American churches and the Bohemian work. What we 
aim at is to make good any existing deficiencies in the common school 
education of the young women, giving them a thorough, practical, and 
working knowledge of the Bible, and training them by practice to do Sun- 
day-school and Bible readers' missionary work. There are many places, 
chiefly in the West and Northwest, where just such workers are sorely 
needed to-day. For example, in Chicago, where there are 40,000 
Bohemians and no Bohemian Bible reader ; St. Paul, where Dr. Dana's 
church has commenced a mission Sunday-school in the Bohemian dis- 
trict, in English ; Iowa City and Omaha, where the Congregational 
churches have commenced similar missions, but have as yet no female 
worker that can speak Bohemian. In other places as St. Louis, Mo., 
and La Crosse, Wis., such work waits to be commenced. 

In the mean time the large and constantly growing Bohemian and 
Polish population, brought up in the old country amidst the supersti- 
tion and corruption of Rome, is becoming dissatisfied with, and is in 
many instances, rebelling against the tyranny of the Romish Church. 
Large masses are renouncing all faith in Christianity, and fall an easy 
prey to gross materialism and to the active propaganda of a blasphemous 
and God-defying atheism. From amongst these are recruited our 
socialists, anarchists, and criminals. Especially lamentable is the con- 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 213 

•dition of the children and youth, who grow up in homes and commu- 
nities from which have vanished even the slender faith and the small 
religious restraints under whose influence their parents grew up. 
If we would save them, and with them our country, we must be up and 
doing. 

Feeling this more deeply than words can express, I long to see the 
Bible Readers' School, so auspiciously commenced, put upon such a 
basis that it can furnish the workers so imperatively needed. It re- 
quires a house of its own, which we could call " The Home," in which the 
teacher or teachers and the pupils could live together, and which would 
be a center for the work. While a missionary in Bruenn, Austria, I 
established such a " Home," of which a German evangelist and his wife 
had charge. My experience there convinces me that a Christian family 
should have charge of this Home, securing for it that family life and 
those family influences which would otherwise be lacking. I have in 
view the right family for the place. Both the man and his wife were 
once school teachers, and are very intelligent, earnest and agreeable 
Christian jjeople. They have three little girls, and I feel convinced 
that they would make a delightful home for the Bible readers. Here 
the young women would feel the power of Christian family life, and be 
trained to habits of helpfulness, industry and neatness to a degree that 
would otherwise be impossible; now they are scattered, boarding 
where they can find a place in Bohemian or other families. 

The only obstacle in the way of starting this much needed Home 
at once is the lack of funds. We could either buy land and erect a 
house for about $10,000, or rent one, by agreeing to take it for three 
years, for about $450 a year. The matron above alluded to, and her 
husband, would charge about $500 a year for their services. The 
expense of living would be divided equally between the members of the 
household. I need not add that every effort would be made to 
study economy in the conduct of such a Home. 

AYhen I see the heart-rending, spiritual destitution of the great 
Slavic population of our country, and remember that they are sur- 
rounded by Christian influences which scarcely touch them • when I 
remember that their destiny is bound up w r ith ours as a nation, and that 
God has sent them to our shores in order that we may win them for 
Christ's kingdom; when I reflect on the immense resources in the 
hands of God's children in this country, and think of the millions we 
are spending for the education and the spiritual good of our own chil- 
dren, and think of the streams of blessing that might flow out from 
such an institution as the Bible Readers' School would be — I 
cannot doubt that God will touch the hearts of some of his faithful 
stewards, and open their eyes to see how great the privilege he confers 
on them of aiding in such a work, which is so fundamental, so neces- 
sary, and so far-reaching in its influence. 



•^14 the home missionary. September, 

AN INEVITABLE CONFLICT. 

In this field there is " a conflict of Christianity with Heathenism." 
My first preaching avoided any special reference to the sins and vices 
of the place, because some of the church thought it wiser not to create 
opposition before we had a foot-hold. But, meeting continually a state 
of things vile beyond description, I felt it my duty to lift up my voice 
in earnest protest. The saloon men, etc., immediately cried out : "We 
help support that man, and he has no right to interfere with our busi- 
ness. We will not stand it!" I do not think I have acted unwisely. The 
conflict was inevitable. Look at the town or city Council, for example : 
One member runs a hotel and gambling-house ; another runs a saloon, 
dance-house, comique theatre, etc.; the third is a mere tool in the hands 
of the former. The postmaster sells the Police News, etc., gambles for 
cigars, and teaches the boys to gamble for the same. The business 
of this place is all opposed, either directly or indirectly, to church 
work ; for the gamblers and saloons predominate. They furnish very 
largely the patronage of the stores. Hence, the merchants are com- 
promised by their relations to such people. There are a few real, thor- 
oughly honest and promising Christians (this is not irony), but they lack 
what the Scotch call "backbone." These are their sentiments, frankly 
spoken : " We have not come into this country to do missionary work." 
" A minister ought to be satisfied if he gets his salary, without asking 
how it is raised." " A minister ought to preach from the pulpit, and 
not touch business matters." " A minister has no business to meddle 
with social evils. It is none of his business who drinks or gambles ; he 
is to preach the gospel, and live peaceably with all men." I believe 
most thoroughly in dealing in a friendly way with all classes ; but there 
is a time when a clearly defined position must be taken. — A Home Mis- 
sionary. 



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. 

BY REV. J. T. FORD, SUPERINTENDENT. 

1. The region known as Southern California is made up of the seven 
southern counties of the State — San Diego, Los Angeles, San Ber- 
nardino, Ventura, Santa Barbara, Kern and San Luis Obispo. Its area 
is 57,800 square miles — a territory 10,000 square miles greater than the 
State of New York, and nearly as great as the six New England States 
taken together. Until within a few years, most of its valuable land was 
held by a few individuals in large stock ranges — Mexican grants — of 
many thousand acres each, and its population was consequently sparse. 

2. About the year 1880, there began a forward movement in popula- 
tion and material prosperity. The population, which in 1880 numbered 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 215 

only 79,151, by the school census of 1886 had increased to 151,721. 
The assessed valuation of Los Angeles County increased, during the 
same time, from eighteen millions to forty millions. Its aggregate of 
real estate sales increased from $5,689,810 in 1882 to $28,204,759 in 
1886. 

3. In the latter half of 1886 this forward movement received new 
momentum — so that the advance of the last twelve months is believed 
to be nearly equal to that of the six years before. The number of pas- 
senger trains between San Bernardino and Los Angeles has increased 
from four to ten per day, and the number of passe.ngers in each train 
has grown in like proportion. Seven new railroads, or branches, or ex- 
tensions, are now in process of construction. At least five more are 
considered certain to follow in the near future. On one of these roads 
twenty towns are planted within a distance of fifty miles, some of which 
have already sprung up to a vigorous growth. It is said that 65,000 
excursionists were booked for Southern California in Eastern cities for 
the winter and spring of 1886-7. They came at the rate of thousands 
per week. If the record of Phillips's excursions furnishes a proper 
basis for a general estimate, one half of these came to stay. According 
to that record they brought, in 1886, twenty- five hundred to Southern 
California, and took back only twelve hundred. The estimated popula- 
tion of San Diego has increased from 5,000 to 15,000, within the year. 
Capital flows in abundantly for investment. Vast enterprises are con- 
ceived and executed — such as the building of palatial hotels, the exca- 
vating of harbors, and the reclaiming of desert wastes by the construc- 
tion of great artificial lakes, with costly water-ways. The price of 
lands has, in many places, doubled, tripled, quadrupled during the year. 

-4. This movement is regarded by many conservative, practical men 
as based upon a wise forecast of the future of this region, and to con- 
tinue for years to come. Such men predict that within a few years Los 
Angeles County alone will have a million of. inhabitants. They base 
their predictions upon facts, or ideas, like the following : Ten acres 
here devoted to fruit-raising will afford as great an income as one hun- 
dred acres sown to grain, and so will support from the soil alone a 
population ten times denser than a grain-producing region. Besides 
those who come to cultivate the soil, many invalids will come to escape 
the rigor of Northern winters; many, tired of migrating between 
Florida and the North, will find here permanent homes, not only 
warmer in winter, but cooler in summer, than at the East ; many rich men — 
some retiring from business — will make here an earthly paradise ; others 
will come to find new fields for profitable investment. Their capital 
will develop resources of which we have not yet dreamed, and will be 
devoted to manufactures, thus providing support for a dense population. 
And that population will come; for, as an old Kansas farmer expressed 
it: " People are going to live where they can live warm.'" 



^16 THE home missionary. September, 

5. All this means that Southern California must have earnest, abun- 
dant home missionary work, and must have it without delay. The 
crowd of immigrants must be met at the moment of their arrival by the 
gospel — welcomed, and won by it — and saved from the spiritual declen- 
sion and moral corruption that so easily follow the transplanting of a 
people from the positive restraints of the public sentiment of their old 
homes. Moreover, they come into the midst of secular activities so in- 
tense, of a world movement so mighty, that eternal verities will be for- 
gotten, and the spiritual lessons of the past crowded out, unless there 
be gospel influences no less positive ; unless there be many voices to 
proclaim and make men to know the unsearchable riches of Christ. 
Nor is this all; the Church of Christ has to battle, on the Pacific coast, 
with the fearful consequences of its own past neglect. When, years 
ago, multitudes from the East came hither for gold, the Church followed 
them only feebly with its evangelistic work. Mining camps, without 
j>reaching and without the church, soon came to be without the Sabbath 
and without God. This ungodliness has come down to the present as 
the prevailing fashion of the region. Public sentiment is averse to 
Sabbath-keeping and church-going. In many places, the new settler 
comes into an atmosphere of spiritual stupefaction hard to resist. He 
yields to it, and is lost to the church. A newly married pair from the 
East came regularly to my church for a few Sabbaths after their arrival. 
Then they said to me; "Our neighbors laugh at us for coming to 
church. They say, 'You'll get over it before you've been here long,' 
but we don't mean to." Nevertheless, they did get over it before 
long. This is only one case among a thousand of the same class. 
With the present rush to Southern California comes the grand op- 
portunity to retrieve the error of the past. The new immigration is, in 
great measure, from Christian communities — from the New England 
zone. It must be saved for Christ by building churches and support- 
ing a gospel ministry in the new settlements from their very start. We 
cannot afford to wait for the new communities to make gospel provision 
for themselves. Satan will make provision for them in advance, and it 
will be accepted. We have no time to lose. To stint our gifts for this 
work will be ruinous economy. There must be no home missionary 
debt to compel a halt in our operations. Let us save the new immigra- 
tion, and we shall turn back the tide of ungodliness, regenerate public 
sentiment, and carry Southern California for Christ. 

6. The work in Southern California is home mission work in a more 
intimate sense than that in many other fields. That region is becoming 
a winter home, a sanitarium, for many from the eastern and northern 
states. Almost every church upon our list will send some of its mem- 
bers to make there a temporary, or a more permanent, home. When 
we think of the home over beyond, we are glad that Jesus Christ has 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 217 

said, " I go to prepare a place for you." It is our privilege to send 
Jesus Christ before us in the person and work of the Home Missionary 
to prepare a place for us and for our own in our Southern California 
home. We are false to ourselves if we fail to do it. 

7. Home missionary investments in Southern California promise 
large profits and quick returns. The gathering of its population in 
densely settled communities furnishes the prospect to churches planted 
there of speedy self-support. The settlers are largely men of wealth ; 
they are in good proportion members of churches ; they come princi- 
pally from the states where Congregational churches are numerous. 
It is believed that a generous outlay in that field will be found soon to 
replenish rather than to deplete the home missionary treasury. Two 
churches lately organized there have become self-supporting during the 
first year of their existence, neither of which could have been formed 
without the promise of home missionary aid. The average contribu- 
tions of our Southern California churches the past year to the home 
missionary treasury have been more than two dollars per member — 
double the average per member of churches at the East. 

8. We need for the work good men, much money, earnest prayers, 
power from on high. Good men — men in vigorous health, able to lay 
foundations, to gather their own congregations, and willing to sacrifice 
themselves for the Master in such work. Much money — money for new 
work in cities, which must be costly at the outset ; in mining towns, 
where all iniquity flaunts itself without restraint, and the voice of the 
preacher is not heard ; in four whole counties where we have as yet 
only three Congregational churches ; in many new towns where church 
lots are offered us if we will plant churches and build houses of worship 
without delay, and where Satan's church — the saloon — will do its soul- 
destroying work unless we hasten. Earnest prayer — power from on 
high, that there may be added to the churches daily such as shall be 
saved. 



A KANSAS PASTOR VISITS GEOEGIA. 

There seems to be a new field for Congregationalism in the South. 
Brother Shaw, of the Berean Church, Atlanta, has demonstrated this. 
His congregation and Sunday-school increases as he enlarges his church. 
His present building, unfinished because the funds are exhausted, is 
already full at some of his evening services. We have little idea of the 
hunger of these people for the gospel. The poor whites of the South 
have been practically left out of consideration, both by the churches 
North and the churches South, until recently, and the success of this 
venture at Atlanta opens to our view a wide field for work. 

The success of Brother Shaw's work depends upon his support. 
The church building ought to be finished, which it is simply impossible 



218 the home missionary. September,. 

for these poor people to do. One thousand dollars will complete all 
the work as it has been projected. Five hundred dollars will go a 
great way. 

After some acquaintance with city missionary work for three years 
and Home Missions for seven years, I must say I never yet saw so 
hopeful a field, nor man and work so well adapted to each other as 
Brother Shaw and his Berean people. 

While planning and working for the colored people, let us not for- 
get the poorer whites for whom Christ died, and for whom Christians 
have done so little. — Rev. J. B. Richardson, Himcatha, Kan. 



FRUIT.— II. 

The Word Honored. — For four weeks we have had a wonderful out- 
pouring of the blessed Spirit of God. Many a day we have spent seven 
hours in the house of God. So deeply did the Spirit move that at 
times it was almost impossible to close the meeting. One of our after- 
meetings lasted until midnight ! A large number appear to have 
started in the new life. Time will prove the depth of their present 
convictions. By their fruits we shall know them. — Minnesota. 

Trained on the Field. — There are no limits to be set on God's spe- 
cial gifts to us. Three years ago there was a great cry for more min- 
isters. I looked over my field here at " the front," and counted a num- 
ber of young men with no aim in life above or beyond handling lumber 
and saw-logs. I prayed about it a while, and then began to preach 
about it. I said, " There are men here whom God wants for his serv- 
ice — to preach the gospel." They were at first surprised, then amused. 
They laughed at the idea, and exclaimed, " That can never be I" This 
only served to increase my faith in the power of God to accomplish his 
purpose with them, and my prayer for them became more intensely 
earnest. 

After a series of meetings where the presence of the Holy Spirit 
was manifested in an unusual degree, a young lawyer came out for 
Christ, and became a new creature. Very soon he told me he felt im- 
pelled to give up the practice of law, and preach the gospel. I gave 
him Christian work for a while, right here, and finding him earnest and 
faithful and adapted to the work, secured for him, through our Super- 
intendent, a larger field. Thus it came to pass that he spent a part of 
the year at work, and the other part at a theological seminary, until 
now he is an active and faithful minister of the blessed Word. 

Three other young men are preparing to follow in his footsteps. 
One, a Scotchman, who has spent his whole life in lumber camps, has 
been a profane man and a drunkard. He seems now to be clean, body 
and soul, even to the giving up of tobacco in every form. The second 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 219 

is a Scandinavian, and the third a German. I keep them all actively at 
work in house-to-house visitation, holding neighborhood meetings, and 
distributing Bibles and tracts. How do we know what hidden talent 
there may be upon our mission tields, waiting to be developed in the 
service of our Lord ? It is only our lack of faith that ever limits God's 
spiritual gifts. Ob, for a deeper experience of God's grace and love! — 
Michigan. 

FROM A NORWEGIAN STUDENT. 

I have been attending the lectures regularly at the Chicago Theolo- 
gical Seminary, and also preaching on the Sabbath, and engaging in 
other missionary work as opportunity has offered. One Friday I set 
out for my former congregations in Iowa, and remained with tnem two 
weeks. During this time I had two services on the Sabbath, evening 
service every day of the week, and house to house visitation during 
each day. In every house I read the Word of God, sang, and prayed. 
The state of religion among these people inspires me with the glad 
hope that many blood-bought souls will be garnered at the last Great 
Harvest. As I look back to the time when I first began Christian work 
among them, and compare it with the present, I exclaim with the 
apostle : " Oh, the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowl- 
edge of God !" Spiritual life is awakened among them, and they have 
a tolerably correct understanding of independent church government. 

While my dear Superintendent Montgomery was in Chicago, I did 
receive letters from many Christian friends in Wisconsin, in the hope 
that there also the Lord would open a door by which we might enter. 
This hope was not disappointed, and my soul has been filled with joy 
unspeakable, for I have never seen the power of the Holy Spirit so 
wonderfully manifest as during this journey. As I passed through the 
different counties, I preached once and twice daily, and visited from 
house to house. The people came eight and twelve miles to the meet- 
ings from the country all around, and listened with joy to the Word of 
God. The Spirit of the Lord was with us, and this much I know, that 
with not a few the Word of God will grow and bear fruit unto everlast- 
ing life. 

Spiritual life among the four sects of Norwegian Lutherans in this 
country is crippled most deplorably. All spiritual life is being de- 
stroyed by teaching useless and speculative dogmas instead of the life 
in Christ. The state of things is so dark that Christian charity could 
not be at a lower ebb among any nominally Christian people. This 
being the case it is readily understood why we, the " Free-Church Peo- 
ple " are watched with suspicion, and exposed to insinuating thrusts of 
doctrine. But these attacks will have no more effect on our cause than 
" a beating of the air," when as sons of peace we go out and pray for 



220 the home missionary. September, 

our enemies and press them to our wounded hearts. Then the peace of 
heaven will flow down upon us, and our feet " will be shod with the prep- 
aration of the gospel of peace." 

We need men in the Norwegian Church, who, consecrated to Christ 
and his cause, will kindle the torch of truth in this pitch-dark night 
of spiritual confusion. If this can be done, the Norwegian Church will 
rise in her power and stand as a city upon a hill. I seem to hear a 
heavenly echo in my soul that it will be done, and done through the 
missionary work already begun. Words fail to express my joy and 
gratitude to God for the American Home Missionary Society which in 
love has remembered my people. May God's blessing rest upon this 
Society! — F. C. J. — Chicago, III. 



SELF-SUPPORT. 



Here endeth the dependence of this church upon the American 
Home Missionary Society! You have helped us four years — gener- 
ously and willingly. You have helped us to our feet, and now we hope 
to fulfill your hopes and expectations by running worthily. The 
brethren say the A. H. M. S. has stood by us nobly ; now we will 
stand by them, and give them the largest collection next year we have 
ever given. — Rev. J. H. Williams, Kansas City, Mo. 

We want to be put on your " Roll of Honor," and we think we de- 
serve it. Our church closes its third year free from all debt,with pledges 
sufficient to secure ample support for the coming year without asking 
the Society for a dollar. The salary of the pastor has been raised to 
$1,800, and the church has prospects of great usefulness for the year to 
come. — Rev. G. M. Sanbome, Little Rock, Ark. 

It is my hope that the Society may not be called upon to aid this 
church again. We are struggling to take care of ourselves, and pay 
our own debts. We believe that the Lord will help those who try to 
help themselves. Last Sunday we had a precious day. Received into 
the church eleven new members, and expect to receive as many more at 
the next communion. We are rapidly getting into shape to do organ- 
ized work here. We send you grateful acknowledgments for what you 
have done to keep this church from dying. — Rev. J. S. Voorhees, Fresno, 
Cal. 

When I sent for that " blank application," we thought we should 
need to use it. But when it came, I laid it before my church with the 
amount we had raised ourselves, and asked them whether we could not 
step out at a time like this, when Home Mission funds were so sorely 
needed elsewhere — step out, trusting in the Lord of hosts, from a de- 
pendent position to a position of self-support. They with one voice 



1887, THE HOME MISSIONARY. 221 

responded, We will try ! God bless them richly and uphold them in 
it! We are going to "try." We will trust in the Lord, and throw our 
$200 into your treasury. Will you at the Bible House plead with the 
Lord of the harvest for our success? — Rev. Geo. IT. Lee, Corvallis, Ore. 

In your published list of churches that have reached self-support 
the past year, no mention seems to be made of Bay Shore, N. Y., date 
February 1st, 1887.— Rev. J. W. Brooks, Brooklyn, JST. Y. 

[This church asked the Society for $400, from June, 1886, to June, 1887; but 
during the year it prospered more than had been counted on, and so, in Febru- 
ary, when their pastor (Rev. Mr. Brooks) was called to another field, they de- 
cided that, with God's help, they would be self-sustaining. In April, Rev. C. W. 
King accepted a call to the pastorate, on a salary of $1,200, and their present 
prosperity is on the increase. The last dollar of debt on the church was paid 
last December, and it is now on a good strong basis. The people, as well as 
these successful pastors, deserve great credit for their earnest efforts and hard 
work.] 



His last Cigar. — After service a young man who had become sud- 
denly impressed with the blessedness of giving, came forward and asked 
if Puget Sound Academy was in need of any further help. I assured 
him that the work had only just commenced; that we must have another 
building before next fall in order to accommodate the young people 
who are asking for admission. "Then," said he, "I want to help a 
little. While listening to what New England people are willing to do, 
and the sacrifices they make to give, I have determined to give up the 
habit of smoking, and save the money used for that to do some good 
with. You may put me down for $100 for the Academy, to be paid 
before next January." Should every professing Christian follow the 
example of this young man the w T ork of the American Home Mission- 
ary Society would never be crippled for want of funds ! — Rev. C. C. 
Otis, Seattle, Wash. Ter. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY 

SOCIETY. 

Home Missionary Wall Map $12 50 

Annual Report of the A. H. M. S 

Wind from the Holy Spirit, paper (portrait) 20 cents. 

" " " •' " " (without portrait) 10 

" " " " " cloth (portrait) 45 

Our Country, paper 25 

" " cloth 50 

Collection Envelopes, per hundred 25 

Origin and Work of the A. H. M. S., Rev. David B. Coe, D.D 50 



222 the home missionary. September, 

HOME MISSIONARY LEAFLETS. 

Per hundred. 

1. A Plea for Home Missions in Three Words, Eev. H. A. Stiinson 35 cents. 

2. The Motive Power in Home Missions, Rev. James Brand 35 

3. Three Ways to increase Benevolent Contributions 35 

4. Woman's Department and the Churches 

5. Forms of Constitution for Woman's Societies 

6. Young People and Home Missions, Mrs. C. C. Creegan 50 

7. Woman's Work in Home Missions, Rev. H. A. Stimson 25 

8. An Example worth Imitating, Mrs. C. L. Goodell 20 

9. Out of print. 

10. Somebody is Shirking, Samuel B. Capen 

11. Modern Migration of Nations, Rev. C. T. Collins 50 

12. Women and the Financial Problem, Mrs. C. L. Blake 20 

13. Suggestions for forming Woman's Societies 

14. " " " Young Ladies' Circles 

15. Work for Young Ladies' Circles 

16. Out of print. 

17. Mustard Seed and a Mountain, Mrs. Alice Eddy Curtiss 50 

18. Aunty Parsons's Story, Mrs. Alice Eddy Curtiss 35 

19. A Dialogue on Home Missions, Mrs. C. A. Richardson 

20. "Clare's Part"; Story of a Home Missionary Box, Mrs. Alice Eddy 
Curtiss 50 

21. Out of print. 

22. Teaching Children to Give, Mrs. John L. Scudder 35 

23. Somebody is Shriveling, Samuel B. Capen 50 

24. For His Sake, Rev. S. J. Humphrey 35 

25. A Pull all together, Rev. Wm. Kincaid 20 

26. Sunday-school Concert Exercise, Mrs. Alice Eddy Curtiss 35 

27. Our Work among Foreigners 35 

•28. Annual Report of the Woman's Department 35 

-29.. The Responsibility for Missionary Debts, Rev. C. A. Northrup 20 

30. An Experiment in Systematic Giving, Rev. George A. Gates 20 

31. Heaven-Sent, Miss Miriam B. Means 35 

"32. Light out of Darkness 35 

33. Emergency Women, Eleanor Earnest 35 

34. A Little Brother and Sister, Mrs. Alice Eddy Curtiss 35 

35. Those After-dinner Coffee-spoons, Mrs. E. W. Noyes 35 

36. What the Deacon Said, Mary E. Bamford 20 

37. Helen Harrison's Awakening, Mrs. J. A. Biddle 35 

38. The White Guards, Mrs. Alice Eddy Curtiss 35 

39. How I became a Home Missionary 50 

40. One Woman's View of Giving 25 

41. A Catechism about the Bohemians. 

42. A Sunday-school Concert Exercise about the Bohemians. 



The Church Builder, published in Kansas City, Mo., has started 
out to build a " New Olivet Congregational House of Worship," by de- 
voting its subscriptions to that object. But it would seem that this 
valuable and most readable paper has been born into the kingdom at 
an opportune time and is building for the State of Missouri as well as 
for Olivet Church. 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 223 

WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT. 



That Massachusetts Watch seems to be fulfilling its mission. 
Through its instrumentality a devoted pastor and his wife in Dakota 
will, before another June meeting at Saratoga, be enabled to move from 
their damp, mouldy rooms under the church to a comfortable little 
parsonage above ground. In reply to recent inquiries as to the method 
of this transformation we would say, that all contributions sent to us 
for that Massachusetts "Parsonage Watch," are used for that special 
parsonage in Dakota. When the amount needed has been received the 
watch is presented to the missionary pastor for whom the parsonage 
has been built. 

We have also on hand a Connecticut Watch, with the following 
request: "Let this watch be used to make a home for some faithful 
missionary pastor. If I had money to put into such a parsonage I 
would keep the watch, but it is a great pleasure to part with it, if it 
can be used in this way." 

The friends of Mrs. Drake, of Dakota, will be interested to learn 
of her safe arrival at her home on the frontier. A large company of 
children, accompanied by older members of the parish, gave her an 
enthusiastic welcome at the railroad station. Within twenty-four 
hours after her arrival this earnest worker was again in the home mis- 
sionary harness attending to the various interests of their large field, 
over which, as " assistant pastor," she renders her husband constant 
and invaluable service. 



BURDEN-BEARERS, THERE AND HERE.* 

BY MES. H. S. CASWELL. 

After an editorial experience of eighteen months, I have come to be- 
lieve, that if each member of the Church of Christ were to take a turn 
at the editorial wheel of our home missionary machinery, there would 
not be known another backward movement in God's work through lack 
of men and means. For when you stand at this point, the whole wide 
field lies before you, and you are brought face to face with its actual 
condition. You cannot escape from the painful certainty that right 
here, within your reach, uncounted multitudes are going down with 
swift feet to eternal death. 

With this weight upon the heart, you gladly come into communica- 
tion with that devoted company, who, following their Master, have 
separated themselves from the world unto a baptism of self-sacrifice 
and suffering, that these lost may be saved, and that this grand, God- 
given inheritance — our country — may, by its own divine enlightenment, 

♦Delivered at the Annual Meeting at Saratoga, June, 1887. 



224 the home missionary. September, 

diffuse the true light to the ends of the earth. Through these 1,571 
missionary pastors, you keep abreast of the work and, in a way, be- 
come identified with it. You enter with the laborer into that absolutely 
new field at the front ; and with keen interest you seem to lend a hand 
at the upturning of the first, fresh sod. And when through his tireless 
effort, the reaping time is at hand, and a spiritual harvest is gathered, 
you are ready with a full heart to thank God and take courage. In- 
deed, unless you have a heart of stone, you find yourself many a morn- 
ing on the mount with one dear Burden-Bearer, praising God for vic- 
tory, and many a night in the valley of the shadows with another, who 
is trying to hold on to his trust in God in the darkness of apparent fail- 
ure and discouragement. In this most helpful companionship, the shin- 
ing words of Jesus, " He that loseth his life for my sake shall find it," 
mean more to you than they used to mean. You become conscious, 
through blessed messages which prove a daily tonic to your faith, that 
there is a depth of joy in divine service which is something more than 
happiness — it is blessechiess. " This work," says one of the little com- 
pany, "has its trials; but they are blessed trials. There can be no 
Christian manhood without trials." 

Another tells you of persecution. He is a foreigner, and at work 
here among his own countrymen. " But these attacks," he exclaims, 
" will have no more effect on our cause than a beating of the air ; for, 
as sons of peace, we will go out and pray for our enemies, and press 
them to our wounded hearts." 

A missionary wife sends you greeting, and says: "The Lord is lead- 
ing us so steadily, not by wonders or miracles, but to see our difficulties 
disappear one by one, while hope takes the place of discouragement, 
until it seems little less than the multiplying of the loaves and fishes 
before our eyes. The only trouble we have is, that we don't half trust 
him." 

Now and then you get a glimpse of missionary experience behind 
the scenes. This from a young pastor : " When we came to this new 
field two years ago our worldly goods consisted of two trunks and eight 
dollars in cash. We borrowed a bedstead, and filled a tick with straw. 
We had two little cups and saucers, and one plate. Our house, with its 
unplastered walls was very open and rough. When the thermometer 
sank too low for comfort, we discussed the question whether we would 
better use our three sheets for their original purpose, or paste them 
over the cracks to keep out the wind. We decided to paste two of 
them over the cracks. One night the fire went out, and the ther- 
mometer went down to forty degrees below zero. We awoke to find our 
heads covered with frost. That morning, my dear young wife, a Boston 
girl, to whom privation was a new experience, took the saw and the 
nails, and helped me to repair the walls of our house. 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 225 

Our pantry lias often been very, very low. We have at times eaten 
the last mouthful of food in our possession ; but the next has always 
been provided. One Saturday night, when we were out of flour, and I 
had but nine cents of money in the house, my wife said, ' With one cent 
more we could buy a loaf of bread.' The next morning I preached as 
usual, and while talking with the people after service a little fellow two 
years old ran away from his mother and dropped a penny into my hat. 
This meant to me God's gift of the needed loaf. At this time my wife 
and I often rode from twenty to forty miles in one day, over the prairie 
working up this new field. Our evening meal was taken anywhere be- 
tween nine and twelve o'clock at night. But this is only one side. Mis- 
sionary life has its bright side and its many blessings. The heart- 
aches, the tears, the untold anxiety, shared with so many of God's 
seed-sowers, are all forgotten when we catch one glimpse of Him whom 
we love, and whom it is our delight to serve." Yes, friends, this is only 
one side, and a pretty dark side, and our brother's field was an excep- 
tional one, even in a new country. 

Now, concerning the Burden-Bearer at the front, by what law does 
an obligation rest upon him to go forth in the name of the Crucified 
One which does not with equal pressure rest upon you and upon me? 
Why are not you, why am not I, in his place to-day, in deadly conflict 
with the powers of evil, struggling to plant the banner of the Cross in 
a God-forsaken region, and standing manfully by it with painful 
hardship and heroic endurance until a permanent foothold can be 
obtained ! 

Why should he contend with unspeakable difficulties and dangers 
and opposition and persecution and defiance and chilling indifference 
to save our dear land for Christ? 

Why should he and his wife and his little ones live in a house of 
sods or logs, or exceptionally ventilated boards, or make their home in 
a damp cellar under the church, or a treacherous tent on the prairie 
with scant furnishings, few comforts and not one luxury ? 

And why should he risk his life by exposure to cold and hunger 
and miles of daily travel, often on foot, over a rough unsettled country, 
through debilitating heat, blistering cold and bewildering storms 
while his brother and sister in the church drift aimlessly on in luxu- 
rious ease, with little thought and less care for the burning questions 
of the day concerning the kingdom of our Lord ; and, instead of the 
glowing words of their first love — " Not I, but Christ" — saying but too 
plainly, by their self-indulgent lives, "Not Christ — but I." 

One of these comfortable professors of the faith of the Cross, beino- 
hard pressed the other day, cried out, " But I must consider my health, 
my circumstances, my family, my prospects." Yes, and so he must, 
within certain limits ; but our brother at the front had prospects and 



226 the home missionary. September, 

family and health to consider, and he committed all these things, with 
himself, body and soul, into God's sure keeping, and begged the holy 
privilege of a position, however obscure or difficult, among the gospel 
seed- sowers. 

Not every Christian soldier, however, is called to bear burdens at 
the front. A company, equally devoted, is stationed at this end of the 
line. God forgive us that its numbers are so small; and that the 
spiritual apathy of the many, lays such heavy burdens upon these faith- 
ful few ! With sinking hearts they compare the munificence of our 
gifts to the world with the pitiful proportion cast into the treasury of 
the Lord. Yet with supreme faith in a divine Leader, they move stead- 
ily on, sustaining the brave workers at tbe front by their prayers, and 
inspiring them by their words of cheer, while doing their utmost to 
provide them with the necessary supplies, at what cost to many a faith- 
ful soul God only knows ! 

The story of one of these hidden ones has just come to me. Within 
ten years he has walked the city streets, with bare feet on the ice, for 
want of money to buy boots ; he has denied himself necessary food that 
his wife and children might have his share of the meager supply. 
Yet, when this burden of extreme poverty is lifted, he hastens with a 
thankful heart to send out to that struggling home missionary church 
in Missouri a communion-service — and a new one at that. " These 
touches tell a story," says his friend, " which makes him seem like an 
angel compared with those, who, socially conspicuous, and spiritually 
dead, can be buried only by an Almighty hand." 

And again the vital question confronts us : Why should the Burden- 
Bearer at this end of the line take upon himself a life of daily self- 
denial that he may use the " largest half " of his little all for the Lord's 
work ? And by what law are you and I exempt from the same sac- 
rifice ? 

[The closing words of this address, which furnish a significant illustration 
of the spirit of one "Burden-Bearer Here," have been already published, and may 
be obtained by application to the Society for Leaflet No. 40, "One Woman's 
View of Giving."] 



A WORD FROM WISCONSIN. 



I fear you will think from our long silence that we are all dead to 
the work, while the fact is, we have never before done as much work as 
in this past year, and never before raised as much money. Our treas- 
urer reports $1,368.95 as having passed through her hands to the vari- 
ous branches of home missionary work during the past eight months. 
The Lord has richly blessed us, and we go forward with renewed cour- 
age— Mrs. H. A. 31. 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 227 

"O LOY AND GEE," 

OUR CHINESE MISSIONARIES. 

O Loy has not been able to devote quite as much time to the even- 
ing school this winter as heretofore, though he has been in regular at- 
tendance. Since the close of our evening school for the summer vaca- 
tion last year he has accepted no pay for his services, but has turned 
over all money sent to him for the benefit of the school — most of it to 
Gee, who has given his time and strength to the work. This was en- 
tirely voluntary, for both Gee and myself tried to persuade him to 
retain it. 

We are deeply concerned . over the condition of the Chinamen at 
Rock Springs. Gee has felt so anxious that he has been unable to get 
a proper amount of sleep, and his health is suffering in consequence. 
I understand there are now about seven hundred Chinese at that place. 
With the exception of a hundred or more professional gamblers, nearly 
all are employed in the coal mines, which are kept running day and 
nioht, doing from three to five days work per week. A large sum of 
money is paid these men each month, and Gee tells me that within a 
week after pay-day most of the money has passed from the hands of 
the miners into the pockets of the gamblers and keepers of opium 
jousts. And, as Gee says: "They are just so bad as can be, and no one 
to point the good way." Gee is at present in poor health. Should he 
regain his strength, I think it is quite likely that he may spend the 
summer vacation in mission work there. 

We — Gee, O Loy and myself — have felt a great desire to assist your 
Society in paying that debt. Perhaps we may yet be able to do a little. 
Miss Annie E. Chapman, Salt Lake City, Utah. 



FROM A NEBRASKA LADY. 



I want to tell you something about the home missionary church at 
Hay Springs, Neb. The pastor came here when he had to drive over 
one hundred miles from Valentine, the nearest railway station. Hay 
Springs was then a tent town. That was only two years ago. He 
built himself a sod-house, and began to hold services in a tent on the 
open prairie. After the tent had been blown down twice, they adjourned 
to a paint shop. September 8th, 1885, a church of nine members was 
formed. September 8th, 1886, a neat little church building was dedi- 
cated, practically free from debt, containing a $150 organ, and other 
necessary furnishings. How is that for western push, assisted by east- 
ern generosity 1 — for $500 from the Church Building Society made the 
thing possible. 

Beside the church that springs up in every town wherever there is a 
Christian family to give the thing a start, and a school-house to hold it 
in, there must be a Sunday-school ; so God's people cannot be idle. 



228 the home missionary. September, 

But there is another side. As soon as a town has the least start, 
the saloon-tent arrives, with its hoard of gamblers, bringing all sorts of 
crime in its train. These towns even yet are very much like " dime 
novel " towns, as one man expressed it. You can hear shooting almost 
any night, and many of the signs in the town are riddled with bullets, 
fired by the cow-boys. 

And now a word about the settlers. There is the Bohemian settler, 
who lives in a half dug-out shanty, the like of which you never saw or 
imagined as a dwelling-place for a human being. There is also the 
restless mover, who is never contented in a settled, civilized com- 
munity. The country here is getting too tame for him, and he is ever 
moving on beyond the railroads. But the majority of the people here 
come from Iowa or Southeastern Nebraska to seek their fortunes. 
Many of them are very poor. Why, I am looked upon as rich 
because I have enough to eat and wear! It would make your heart 
ache to see how many people there are here not half prepared for 
winter. A few words tell the whole story. A couple arrive in a new 
country, with their little ones and perhaps $10 in money. They put 
up a sod-house, put a crop into the ground, dig a well, haul wood to 
town to buy their flour, live without meat, sugar, tea and clothes. 
Some one sells them a cow on trust, and they feed their team on prairie 
grass until the crops grow and furnish corn and hay. They have a 
good crop, and are all right. Sometimes the crop fails, and then fol- 
lows the sad story of want and suffering so prevalent in a new country. 



OUE YOUNG PEOPLE. 



The late mails have been bringing the following question from 
our young people: "Is there no longer a Younc/ People's Department 
in The Home Missionary?" A natural question, and we hasten to 
reply. In July, your corner, and in fact all the pages of the magazine, 
were claimed by the officers of the Society for the long, long report of 
the work of the year. In August you were crowded out again because 
of the many good things said at Saratoga, which the people who live in 
" Grown-up Land " wanted to read. We hope to go on our way through 
the remainder of the year without interruption. 



LETTER No. 10. 

My Dear Young Friends :— I believe I told you in the beginning of 
our correspondence that I make over 25,000 visits through these United 
States every month, besides a trip across the sea to Europe, Asia, 
Africa, China, Japan and Turkey, and always find myself quite at home 
with all true missionary people. Daring these visits I have noted with 
pleasure your efforts to answer my home missionary conundrums. You 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 229 

will have no further questions about the Bohemians, because we have 
just published two very useful books upon this subject, which you can 
have by asking for "A Catechism, and Sunday-school Exercise, about 
the Bohemians." But do not throw aside your " thinking-caps," for I 
shall soon puzzle your young brains with a new list of questions about 
other home missionary matters. Only a few have been able to answer 
numbers 23, 24, 25 and 26 ; let this fact prove a source of comfort to 
the unsuccessful. The correct answers will be published next month ; 
but for the benefit of those who "looked everywhere, and failed to 
find," let me give you a few bits of history. 

More than 500 years ago, Bohemia had a king who was blind; his 
name was John. At this time Edward III. was King of England. His 
son, the Prince of Wales, was called the " Black Prince," because he 
wore a black armor. During a war between England and France, John, 
the blind king of Bohemia, took sides with France against England, 
and was killed by the " Black Prince," who then appropriated King 
John's crest, which was three ostrich feathers. From that time to this, 
the crest of the Prince of Wales has been three ostrich feathers. It 
seems strange, after all this, that the granddaughter of the blind king 
of Bohemia should have been prevailed upon to marry the son of the 
" Black Prince." 

About 300 years later, after many terrible religious wars, Frederic 
and Elizabeth became King and Queen of Bohemia. Elizabeth was the 
daughter of James I. of England. This king and queen defended the 
Protestants, but were defeated, and had to fly for their lives. Sophia, 
the daughter of Queen Elizabeth, became afterward the mother of 
George I. of England. Queen Victoria is thus a lineal descendant of 
the Queen of Bohemia. 

After the death of her husband, Queen Elizabeth found a refuge in 
Holland ; but she had a hard time, and was frequently at a loss for the 
means of living. 

Then came a century and a half of dreadful persecution ; but the 
enemies of the truth could not kill the roots of the blessed gospel 
planted by John Huss and others. The suffering people used to hide 
their- Bibles during the day-time in very curious places, and get together 
at night in the woods, or stables, or cellars, to read them. 

My dear young people, if you and I and all our* friends do not soon 
take some active measures to save our country, we shall be compelled to 
pass through similar experiences. — Your friend, The Home Missionary. 



To a boy or girl who wants to help. Collect all the books which 
can be spared for a Sunday-school out West. Put them in a box and 
direct it to The Home Missionary, Bible House, New York City, with 
a letter telling us where the books come from. 



230 the home missionary. September, 

QUESTIONS. 

21. What is the name of that good Christian Bohemian who preached 
the gospel of Jesus Christ to the people in 1403 ? 

22. Who will tell us something about him? 

23. How long were the followers of this good man persecuted on 
account of their religious belief ? 

24. What king released them from this persecution ? 

25. What is the crest of the Prince of Wales ? and where did England 
get that crest ? 

26. What connection has Queen Victoria with the Bohemians ? 

27. How many Bohemians and Poles are there in this country who 
need the gospel, and how many missionaries are preaching it to them 
under Superintendent Schaufner's care? 

28. How many Germans are there in this country who need the 
gospel, and how many missionaries are preaching it to them under 
Superintendent Albrecht's care ? 

29. How many Scandinavians are there in this country who need the 
gospel, and how many missionaries are preaching it to them under 
Superintendent Montgomery's care ? 

30. Why are there so many people in this country who never hear 
the gospel preached ? 



JOHN HUSS. 

John Huss was a Bohemian, born about 1369. His surname was 
derived from the place of his birth, Hussinetz, near Bavaria. He 
graduated from the University of Prague in 1393, afterward taught and 
lectured on philosophy and theology, and in 1402 was installed preacher 
in the Bethany chapel, which he had established ten years earlier. 
Huss became confessor to the queen, and the head of a party for re- 
form in doctrine in the Romish Church. His preaching against the 
vices of the clergy aroused great opposition. He became rector of the 
university, and, on account of his trouble with the archbishop, there 
came to be warfare between the university and the cathedral. The 
pope supported the latter, and the archbishop caused two hundred of 
the works of Wyckliffe to be burned. Against this Huss protested, was 
accused of heresy and summoned to Rome. Advocates were sent to 
plead his cause but were not heard. He was condemned as a heretic 
and ordered to leave Prague, which he did. An outbreak followed ; 
the friends of Huss were victorious ; he returned to his chapel and 
preached more boldly than before against the corruptions of the 
church. Great strife followed. On account of his thus preaching and 
asserting the right of conscience he was again summoned to Rome, but 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 231 

paid no attention to the order. Huss was once more condemned, and 
at the request of the king left Prague and went to his native town, but 
continued to preach in the cities, and after a time removed to the 
Castle of Cracowitz. In 1414 he was summoned before a council at 
Constance. Here he was met by a friendly greeting from the pope, and 
for some time was free to preach. On November 28th he was re-ar- 
rested, was imprisoned and treated with great injustice by his enemies. 
June 5th, 1415, he had his first hearing, which was renewed on the 7th, 
when various charges of heresy were made against him. He was com- 
manded to retract these, but declined to do so. June 24th his books 
were burned, and on July 6th he received his sentence. He was taken 
out of the city, to a field, to be burned at the stake. After the fire was 
kindled he began to sing the " Kyrie Edeison" and continued singing 
until suffocated by the smoke and flame. His ashes were gathered and 
thrown into the Rhine, after which all traces of the fire were taken 
away so that no one knows the exact spot where he died. During his 
life he wrote one hundred and thirty-six different treatises. — Jessie 
II. L. — Michigan. 



CAN YOU MAKE IT OUT? 



When I was a child, we used to learn the Bible lessons by heart — 
verse after verse — whole chapters. And the good of it is, that when 
you learn things in that way, you remember them ; what you learn when 
young seems to stick by and is not forgotten. And they made us learn 
the order of the books of the Bible, so that when a book was referred 
to, we did not have to shuffle the leaves backward and forward, till we 
happened to hit upon it. We learned also the order in which they 
ought to be, because Job is one of the oldest books and Ezra and 
Nehemiah are two of the latest. And the prophets, those shorter books, 
were written in the times of the Kings of Judah and Israel. 

Some Sunday, when you do not know just what to do, see if you can 
learn the names of the books in then' order. Also perhaps by the dates, 
you will like to find out the order in which they ought to come. There 
are the long books, Isaiah, Jeremiah and Ezekiel ; and the shorter ones, 
which they call the minor prophets. (If you don't know what minor 
means, look in the dictionary.) 

Those men used to see visions. They would, in a sort of dream, see 
things which were to come in some future time, and some of the visions are 
very striking. There is one where the prophet seemed to see what is very 
familiar to us, and it is exactly as one might describe it, who stood at a 
distance and just beheld it ; and it is something which helps on Home 
Missions. The prophet kuew about Home Missions for he preached to 
his own people, though he told them also about other nations. It looks 



232 the home missionary. September, 

as if he saw in his vision, as we see things in our dreams, these things 
that make it easier to go from place to place, and to send what is needed 
for the work. I do not say positively that this was what was meant, 
because he was talking of another people. But it looks wonderfully like 
it. Can you from this, make out what is meant ? — Your friend, Esther. 



THE WOKK AT HAND. — IV. 
A Story for Girls. 

BY MRS. LOUISA P. HOPKINS. 

" Do the duty that lies nearest thee ; the next will already have become plainer." 

The Beginning of a Home Missionary Church. — The morning broke 
and scattered its inspiring light over the gray sea. As beautiful a light 
was shining in the hearts of the two girls who were planning a work 
for this neglected fishing village. 

With a neat dress and other garments for Eliza Jane, and hats, 
jackets and trousers for their excellencies, the twin Things, Lucia and 
Anna bent their steps, at nine o'clock that morning, toward the house 
of the fisherman, Ezekiel Thing. As they drew near the little village 
they saw a crowd of children, bare-legged and hatless, playing in the 
mud or in the boats hauled up above the retreating tide. Larger boys 
were digging clams out on the black bottom of the flats and bringing 
them to the rocks where the girls were shelling them into pans by 
the heaps where they were dumped. There was much swearing among 
the almost naked swarm, and a very evident air of coarse vulgarity, 
which showed the low and rough surroundings to have become a part 
of their very natures. On seeing the visitors approach, Eliza Jane 
came forward a little, and the others stood up in an expectant attitude, 
but with some defiance of manner as she called out, "What yer got for 
me?" 

" Come here," said Lucia, " and you shall know;" but by this time 
the others had begun to laugh at her and push her rudely forward, and 
she refused to draw nearer. Then Anna and Lucia walked down into 
the midst of them and said, " We are going to have a nice company 
down here every Sunday morning and we came to invite you all to 
come. You shall see what pretty clean clothes we will bring you to 
wear to it. Now we want you to tell us of a room where we can have 
the company. Is there a house or a shop that nobody lives in here?" 

"There's one; Daddy Thurlow's old shoe shop," said one of the 
older boys, as he stood on the gunwale of a muddy boat with his sturdy 
form well-braced and his shaggy head lifted in a more manly fashion 
than belonged to his companions. 

"Let's go and see it!" said Lucia. 

Now appeared a curious and unprecedented spectacle in this region ; 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 233 

twenty or thirty boys ami girls led along the edge of the dirty street, 
on the river-margin, by two delicate girls absorbed in a pure purpose 
of love for them and their unblest homes ! After a walk of a few rods 
they reached a small building of two rooms, one of which had three 
windows somewhat broken and partly boarded up. All was dust and 
desolation inside as they peered in. "Where is Mr. Thurlow?" said 
Anna. " Yer mean Daddy Thurlow, don't yer ?" said one of the boys, 
"He lives in that house." 



AMERICAN COLLEGE AND EDUCATION SOCIETY. 

Rev. John A. Hamilton, D.D., Secretary. 

19 Congregational House, Boston. James M. Gordon, Esq., Treasurer. 

[Money for the Society may be sent to James M. Gordon, Esq., Treasurer, No. 10 

Congregational House, Boston; or to Rev. Alexander H. Clapp, D.D., 34 Bible 

House, New York.] 

WHITMAN COLLEGE. 

This young, remote and comparatively unknown college, like many 
an older and stronger one, possesses a priceless history, including its 
heroic origin, its distinctive reason for being, and its hard struggle for 
continued existence and growth. It is an outcome of the action of the 
A. B. C. F. M. in sending to the Indians of the Upper Columbia basin, 
in 1836-38, the missionaries Whitman, Eells, Walker and Spaulding, 
and their equally faithful wives. It bears the name of one of them — 
the Christian martyr and patriot, Dr. Marcus Whitman — and was 
founded by another and still surviving member of that self-denying 
band— Rev. Dr. Cushing Eells. With such an origin, and with the 
motto, Pro Christo et -Patria, springing up naturally out of its history, 
and with all Eastern Washington and Eastern Oregon for its field of 
operations, its trustees and friends feel that a great duty would be left 
undone did they not appeal for aid to the Christian public in sympathy 
with the patriotic work of Dr. Whitman and the Christian deeds of the 
American Board and its missionaries. 

In the editorial comments of The Advance of May 5th, 1887, are the 
following stirring words in the same direction : 

"If our American colleges are indeed our American Westminster 
Abbey, wherein are enshrined in enduring and ever grateful memorial 
the names of so many of the noblest of American public benefactors, 
nothing could be more befitting than that Dr. Marcus Whitman, the ori- 
ginal pathfinder of the Northern Rocky Mountain range, and through 
whose personal influence it was that that vast region of our real North- 
west was saved to the Union, should have his memory perpetuated in 
the leading Christian college of that region, and also that it should be 
located near the old Whitman Mission grounds, where Dr. Whitman 



234 the home missionary. September? 

and thirteen others were massacred by the Indians in 1847. If the 
value of his service, not only to the cause of Christian missions, but to 
the nation itself, were fully appreciated, it would seem an easy matter 
to gather funds nobly to endow this Whitman College. 

" Mr. Gladstone, in a speech last we t ek, alluding to his own great in- 
terest in American history, declared that the birth of the American 
State was of more interest than any other it was possible to study. 
'Whenever a youth, desirous of studying political history, consults me/ 
he said, 'respecting a course of study in political history, I always refer 
him to the early history of America.' But the 'early history of 
America ' has been, in its most essential respects, repeating itself in 
each new State, as the course of empire takes its way westward across 
the continent. And of all the great and resplendent lessons in political 
and social science which from first to last — from Harvard to Whitman 
— this history brings into view, none is more worthy of note than the 
vital and absolutely essential relation which the system of the Christian 
common school, culminating in the Christian college, bears to the life 
and safety and freedom and perpetuated prosperity of the State. In 
the same breath with the shout of Christian patriotism, Long live the 
State! must go up the cry, Long live the Christian college !" 

President Anderson, of Whitman College, is expected east in Sep- 
tember, and will set forth in his own way the claims of this most worthy 
and promising institution. We earnestly hope that the benevolent 
Christian public will give him a ready hearing and a generous response. 



CHILDREN'S BOHEMIAN FUND. 

Previously acknowledged $1,710 09 

Connecticut, Harwintou 10 00 

Massachusetts, Boston 1 00 

Bridgewater, East , 3 60 

Brookfleld, West 5 00 

Enfield 20 oo 

Spencer 12 50 

New York, Brooklyn 2 00 

Warsaw 18 03 

$1,7S2 22 



WOMAN'S FUND FOR MISSIONARY SALARIES. 

Previously acknowledged $314 50 

Connecticut, Norwich 50 oo 

Salisbury 32 23 

District of Columbia, Washington, including April contribution, $25 50 00 

$446 73 



Woman's Fund for Foreign Work $5,679 16 



MISSIONARY BOXES. 



For many years the ladies of our churches have helped this Society and cheered the 
homes of its missionaries with boxes of clothing and other useful articles. The continuance 
of these favors is earnestly solicited. To secure satisfactory preparation and just distribu- 
tion, attention is invited to the following suggestions. 

1. Apply to the Secretaries to designate a family needing such assistance, and state, 
y practicable, how soon a box will probaoly be sent. 

2. If a family is selected without applying to the Secretaries, notify them without delay 
so as to guard against a duplication of gifts. 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



235 



3. If several months should elapse before the box is ready to be sent, ascertain from the 
Secretaries whether the missionary's address remains as previously given. 

4. Mark the box plainly and indelibly, fasten it securely, and forward it to the missionary, 
not by express, but by a Forwarding Company, if practicable ; otherwise, as "fast freight,"' 
Dy railroad, taking tico receipts from the Company. 

5. Write to the missionary, inclosing one of these receipts, a list of the articles sent in 
the box, and the money, $2, $3, or $4, according to weight and distance, for the payment of 
freight (if it cannot be prepaid). Mention, also, the name of the person to whom a letter 
of acknowledgment should be addressed. 

6. Report to the Secretaries the forwarding of the box, its estimated value, and the 
amount sent for freight, in order that the donation may be acknowledged in The Home 
Missionary. 

7. If a box has been prepared, not for a specified family, but to be assigned by the 
Secretaries, put into it a list of its contents, the name of the association or individual from 
whom it comes, and the address or the person to whom the missionary may send his letter of 
acknowledgment. 

8. Mark the box. "American Horns Missionary Society, Bible House, Astor Place, New 
York," adding the name of the place from which it cornea. 

9. Write to the Secretaries, inclosing moneyfor freight, and stating the time when and 
the line by which the box was sent, its estimated value, and giving a list of contents to guide 
in the assignment of the box. Be careful to state the size of each adult, and the age and 
sex of each child for whom the clothing is intended, as boxes are not opened at the office. 

10. These donations are not deducted from the grants of the Society. It needs the same 
amount of money, therefore, in order to fulfill its stipulations with its missionaries, as if no 
such gifts were provided ; and we trust the friends of Home Missions will not withhold or 
diminish their contributions of money in consequence of their giving other things that are 
needful. 



APPOINTMENTS IN JULY, 1887. 



Sot in commission last year. 

Alden, Frederick, Vernon, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Biakeslee, Allen 1)., Wayzata, Minn. 

Bnell, Lewin F., East Pharsaha, N. Y. 

Butler, Elias fit., Blackinar and out-stations, 
Mich. 

Child, E. A., Red Jacket, Mich. 

Daley, Charles M., Willow Lake, East and West 
spirit LaKe, Dak. 

Drew, James B., St. Paul. Minn. 

Du Bois, Daniel G., New Rockford and out-sta- 
tions, Dak. 

Foster, Festus, Kiowa. Kan. 

Hodder, A. W. H., Henrietta, N. Y". 

Lee, G. S., Osceola, N. Y. 

Morton, G., Hariisville, X. Y. 

Parsons, Kobert, Kockwood, Mich. 

Peck, B. D., Madison, N. Y. 

Powelson, Alfred P., Tacoina, Wash. Ter. 

Sloate, MissHattie B., Teacher, Vinita, Ind. Ter. 

Sutherland, John M., Bronson and Gilead, Mich. 

Tuttle, Henry W., West Greece, N. T. 

Wheelock, Rufus A., Sherman. Tex. 

Woodhuil, George H., Kaynioudville. N. Y. 

Zunberlake, Miss Kate, Teacher, Vinita, Ind. 
Ter. 

Re-commissioned. 

Ainslie, James S., Ogdensburg. N. Y. 

Bacon, Miles E., Arena, Logan, Cramer and 
Hodgmau's stations, Dak. 

Baldwin, David J., Pierce, Neb. 

Barber, LeinanN., Paradise, Magolia and Chero- 
kee, Cal. 

Barker, Peleg, Royal Oak, Mich. 

Barnes, Orlando C, Parishville, X. Y. 

Barllett, Dana W., St. Louis, Mo. 

Belsoy, George, Lead City and Terraville, Dak. 

Billings, Charles S., Evangelist, Neb. 

Cadwalader, John, West Bangor, Penn. 

Cash, Elijah, Edgeuiontand Eagle Rock, Cal. 

Child.--, Truman D., Fowler City, Montezuma and 
Crooked Creek. Kan. 

Clark, James B., Butte City, Mon. 

Coate, lleury.Morenciand Canaudaigua, Mich. 

Corwin, diaries L., Auburn, Cal. 

Dean, Amos N., Cambridge, Neb. 

De Geer, W. W.. Rockford, Mich. 

Doyle, Amos A., Sherman, Sumner and Newton 
Schoolhouse, Kan. 

Dyer, Miss Louisa M., Teacher, Vinita, Ind. Ter. 

Eastr*a«, Adelbert L., Pror»aud Lehi, Utah. 



Eastman, Warren F., Rushville, Neb. 

Fishet, Samuel V. s., Minneapolis, filinn. 

Fletcher, Kufus W., Hart, Mich. 

Gilchrist, Howard EL, Little River, Kan. 

Griffin, Miss Sally E.. Teacher, Vinita, Ind. Ter. 

Griffiths, Henry, Gl jversville and Park, Neb. 

Hamlen, Chauncey L.. Coliiriwood, O. 

HancocK, Joseph J., East Randolph, N. Y. 

Hctzler, Henry, Long Lake, Dak. 

Hoffman, Eiisha A., Belden and out-station, O. 

Holt, Joseph W., Rosedale, White Settlemeat, 
Hay Lake. Grier's and Christie's School- 
house, Mich. 

Houston, Warren H., Macon, Alpine, Harmony 
and Hadley, Neb. 

Howard, John F., Chenango Forks, N. Y. 

Hughes, Benj. M., Shamokiu, Penn. 

Huilinger, Frank W., Teacher, Vinita, Ind. Ter. 

Jones, James V., Osage, Peterton and Reading, 
Kan. 

Keeler, John W., Columbus, N. Y. 

Kel-ey, Francis D., Helena, Mon. 

Killip, Kobert, Crested Butte, Colo. 

King, John W., Eaton, Colo. 

McArthur, W T illiam W., Mentor and Maple Bay, 
Minn. 

Mcintosh, David C, Breckenridge and Utica, Mo. 

McKee, James H., Little Valley, N. Y. 

MUligan, John A., Omaha, Neb. 

Moms, George, Port Costa and Crockett, Cal. 

Moses, Leonard H., Mapleton and Sterling, Minn 

Music, Miss Emma G., Teacher, Vinita, Ind. Ter. 

Newberry, Charles E., Steilacoom and out-sta- 
tions, Wash. Ter. 

Palmer, A. Burton, San Juan, Cal. 

Parker, Joseph H., Wichita. Kan.. 

Pasco, Martin K., Little. Fails, Minn. 

Phillips, Charles H., Cumings, Buxton and Upson, 
Kan. 

Piatt, Luther H., Dover and W r akarusa Valley, Kan. 

Poiter, T. Arthur, Farwell, .Mich. 

Powell, Gregory J., Chadron and Flag Butte, Neb. 

Rankin, Adam L., South Vallejo, Cal. 

RedeoH, Kichard, Sherman, Cleon, Marilla aad 
Wexf id, Mich: 

Resner. Asdrew, Herndon and Ludell, Kan. 

Richard son, Albert^M., Tonganoxie id Kan- 
waka, Kan. 

Rogers, Enoch E., Pajnesville and Calhoun Lake, 
Minn. 

SaUzar, J. Pablo, San Rafael, Grants and Gallito. 
New Mex. 



236 



THE HOME MISSIONARY 



Septenibe 



Schram, George A., Breckenridge. MiDn. 

Scurr, Wi liam, Minden and White Rock, Mich. 

Shaver, Fred A., Hermosa, Dak. 

Sherwood, Nathan M., Jersey City, N. J. 

Smith, David O., Campbell, Neb. 

Strong. Jacob H., Clayton and Pacheci, Cal. 

Thalberg, H. L., Huron, Dak. 

Thome, James A., Ogalalla and Grant, Neb. 

TraverE, Robert M., Ravenna, Neb. 

Tuck, Mark W., Wolverine and Rondo, Mich. 



Van Antwerp, John, Alma, Mich. 
Van Auken, Chauncey F., Evangelist, Mich. 
Vetter, John, Elaon and out^stations, Mo. 
Weidman, Peter, Spring Creek, Nelson and vi- 
cinity, Neb. 
Wherland, James D., Riverdale, Mo. 
Wirt, David, Sykeston, Ontario and Towner, Dak. 
Wood, Abel 8., Philadelphia, N. Y. 
Wood, Melvin C, Harrison, Mich. 
Worden, S. A., Oriskany Falls, N. Y. 



RECEIPTS IN JULY, 1887. 



MAINE— $127.00. 
Farmington, " A Widow's Investment," 

by Rev. C. H. Pope 

Portland, by G. F. Thurston 

Saco, First, by J. W. Littlefield 

NEW HAMPSHIRE— $69.40. 

Concord, First, by J. C. Thorne 

GUmanton, A. M. Eastman 

Manchester, C. B. Southworrh 

Pelham, Mrs. E. W. Tyler, for Woman's 

Foreign fund 

Mrs. E. W. Tyler 

Rochester, Friends 

VERMONT— $358.79 ; of which Legacy, 
$200.00. 
Vermont Domestic Miss. Soc, by J. C. 

Emery, Treas 

Barton Landing and P.rownington, by 

J. D. R. Collins 

Burlington, Third Ch.,byG. G. Benedict 
Castletou, mon. con., by Rev. G. P. By- 

ington 

Mlddlebnry, Legacy of Mrs. M. M. Bar- 
rows, by H. R. Barrows, Ex'r, to 

const. Mrs. S. D. Lyman, Dea. L. C. 

Barrows, F. L. Borrows and C. B. 

Barton L. Ms 

Proctor, Ladies' Aid Soc, by Mrs. E. R. 

Mead 

Waterbury , by Rev. C. M. Sheldon 

MASSACHUSETTS— $2,550.69; of which 
Legacies, $1,284.32. 
Mass. Home Miss. So::., by Rev. E. B. 

Palmer, Treas., of which $5'.i0 from A. 

E . Hildrei h estate, annuity . . 

Amesbury. by E. A. Goodwin 

Amherst, by Miss Bessie Fletcher 

By W. Hamlin 

Auburndale, Mrs. J. O. Means 

Bedford, Ladies' H. M. Soc, by Mrs. W. 

G. Webber 

Boston, Maverick Cti. Branch Sunday- 
school, for Bohemian work, by Rev. 

E. B. Palmer 

Dlghton. Ladies' Soc, by Mrs. W. B. 

Greene 

East Bridgewater, Ladies' Union Soc, 

by P. M. Keith 

East Grauville, Y. P. S. C. E., by W. 

Griswold 

Enfield, Sunday-school classes of Mrs. 

J. E. and Mrs. I. S. Woods, for Chil- 
dren's Bohemian fund 

Goshen, by A. Hawks 

Greenfield, Legacy of Mrs. Eliza S. 

Grinnell, by James S. Grinnell 

Greenwich, H. M. Wood3 

Hyde Park, by J. Ellery Piper, special, 

by Rev. E. B. Palmer 

Longmeadow, T. P. Carleton 

North Acton, Sunday-school, by O. W. 

Dutton 

North Brookfield, Mrs. M. T. Reed 

Northfield, Mrs. A. M. D. Alexander, to 

const. Miss Mary T. Dutton a L. M 



$50 00 
55 00 
22 00 


$8 00 

1 40 

25 00 


5 00 

10 00 
20 00 



$25 00 



9 94 
106 01 



5 30 

8 30 



$617 50 
5 40 
5 00 
5J 00 
10 00 

25 00 



1 00 

17 50 

3 60 

3 57 



20 00 
10 00 



500 00 
5 00 



19 25 
2 00 



12 00 
5 00 



50 00 



Oxford, oy O. F. Joslin $30 00 

Revere, A Friend, by J. B. C 100 

Sheffield, by H. Dutcher 7 5*0 

Southboro, L. C. Newton 1 00 

Southbridge, Mrs. S. R. Donty 40 

Spencer, Cong. Sunday-school class No. 
26. by Mrs. S. A. Temple, for Chil- 
dren's Bohemian fund, by Rev. E. B. 

Palmer 12 50 

Springfield, from Estate of Francis A. 
Brewer, by Marv Adams Brewer, Ex. 400 00 

Stockbridge, A Friend 5 00 

Tewksbury, by E. Foster 44 00 

Uxbridge, Legacy of Mrs. A. H. Tucker, 

bv J. Tatt, Ex 384 32 

Wakefield, by G. R. Morrison 67 35 

West Brookfield, Young People's Mis- 
sion Circle, for Children's Bohemian 

fund, by Rev. E. B. Palmer 5 00 

Worcester, Salem St. Cong. Ch., of 
which $50 for contingent fund, to 
const. Rev. Isaac J. Lansing, Mrs. 
Ezra Sawyer, Moses Church and Cnas. 
D. Parker L. Ms., by E. Tucker, Jr. . . 238 80 
RHODE ISLAND— $362.27; of which Leg- 
acy, $50.87. 

Central Falls, A Friend 25 00 

Newport, Remainder of Lega:y of Mary 
A. Roberts, by Francis B. Peckham.. 50 8T 

Pa wtuckel , by E. R . Bullock 267 52 

Saylesville, M. S. Harris 5 00 

Tiverton, Sunday-school, by A. E. 

Brown 13 88 

CONNECTICUT— $3,239.59; of which Leg- 
acies, $2,050.00. 
Miss. Soc. of Conn., by Rev. W. H. 

Moore, Sec 46 48 

Bnstoi,byH. Beckwith 75 00 

Canton Center, by W. G. Hallock 41 00 

Darien, W. M. Nash 1 00 

Fair Haven, by W. Hemingway 69 04 

Farmington, by F. C. Jones 73 15 

Hartfoid, Miss E. R. Hyde 2 00 

Harwinton, "Try in Earnest Cluo," by 
A. Gibbs, for Children's Bohemian 

fund 10 00 

Madison, on account of Legacy of G. 

M. Dowd, by W. S. Hull, Ex 50 00 

New Haven, Ch. of the Redeemer, bal. 

of coll., by J. B. Baldwin 83 25 

MissK. A. Marvin 2 50 

"Our Country" 2 00 

Norwalk, First, by E. C. Bissell 80 00 

Norwich, Legacy of Mrs. H. B. Norton, 

by Miss E. F. Norton 1,000 00 

Broadway Ch., Dea. B. W. Tompkins, 
to const. Henry B. Norton, Amos 
W. Prentice and WiHiam P. Greene 

L. Ms. , by S . B. Bishop, Treas 150 00 

A Friend, to const. Miss E. S. Gilman 

a L. M 50 00 

Putnam, Second, by H. N. Fenn 17 3 9 

Salisbury, by Rev. J. C. Goddard 125 2 

Ladies' H. M. Soc, for Woman's Dept. 32 a" 

Saugatuck, by H. C. Woodworth 30 03 

Somers, by L. W. Percival 2 5 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



237 



South Britain, by H. P. Downes $15 00 

Southington, by 1. F. Pratt 100 00 

South Windsor, First, by C. J. Rockwell 21 78 

Stafford Springs, t>v P. H. Spelmao 20 41 

Washington, by T.N. Galpi n 1C9 75 

West Norfolk, A Friend 2 00 

Westporr, Legacy of Mrs. Eliza L. 

Wakeman, by I.. P. VVaVeraan, Ex... 1,000 00 
Woodstock, First, in part to const, a L. 

M., by H. T. Child 27 85 

NEW YORK— $3,286.70; of which Lega- 
cy, $280.42. 
Received by Rev. C. C. Creegan: 

Owego $2100 

[Erroneously acknowledged in July.] 
Received by Mrs. L. H. Cobb. Treas. 

Woman's II. M. Union, Fairport, 

Ladles' Aux., by J. E. Howard, to 

const, a L. M 50 00 

Angola, by W. Woods. 5 78 

Brooklyn. Union Oh., by E. K. Stewart. 5 00 

South Ch., by J. C'rowell 125 00 

Berrien Faith Sunday-school, by Rev. 
J. C. Young, special 10 00 

Rev. S. W. Powell, for Bohemian 

work 2 00 

Buffalo, by Re v. A . L. Smalley 5 00 

Danaville, Dr. J. H. Jackson, by Mrs. 

C. A. Richardson 5 00 

East Rocka way , by Rev. C. H. Bente ... 17 59 

Friendship, by Rev. M. Gaff ney 6 50 

Gloversville, *Ch., $200; Mrs. W. M. 

Place, $t0», by J. O. Karker 300 00 

Greenbush, by Rev. D. C. MoNair 11 00 

Hopkinton, First, to const. Miss Grace 

Brush a L. M., by Rev. H. A. Ottman 83 00 

Ithaca, by Rev. C. C. Creegan 56 47 

Lockport, Cong. Sunday-school, by W. 

W. Trevor 75 00 

Maine Village, by Rev. C H. Kilmer. . . 17 40 

Mt. Vernon, Mrs. M. C. Kellogg 30 00 

New York City, Broadway Tabernaole 

Ch., L. C. Warner, $300; C. N. Bliss, 

$100; A. T. Hull. $20 420 00 

I. E. Smith, $1,400; S. T. Gordon, $250; 
W. H. Lum, $12.50; Dea. J. G. Mi- 
nor, $10 1,672 50 

North Evans, by Rev . A. Big<Mow 24 88 

North Java, by Rev. J. H. Mallows 5 00 

Paris, by Rev. W. E. Mather 34 13 

Parkvilie, by Rev. E. Beecher, D.D 5 00 

Perry Center, Young People, by Mrs. J. 

W. Grush.. 3 00 

Sinclairville, Cong. Sunday-school, by 

Rev. J. E. Tinker 10 00 

Spencerporl, Mrs. C. D. Dill 5 00 

Warsaw, special, by W. A. Walker 18 03 

Wellsville, Legacy of Mary S. White, 

by O. Harris ' Att'y for Ex's 2 SO 42 

W T est Brook, Plymouth Ch., by W. L. 

McUlenon 4 00 

NEW JERSEY— $152.95. 

Chatham, by Rev. R. S. Stone 5 00 

Jersey City, by Rev. N. M. Sherwood... 7 95 

New Jersey, A Friend 100 00 

Plalnfleld, Mission Band of Willing 

Workers, by J. H. Lapsley 40 00 

PENNSYLVANIA— $41.43. 

Alden, by Rev. D. I. Jones 3 GO 

Bangor, by Rev. J. Williams 5 00 

Drifton, by Rev. J. F. Humphrey 5 00 

Sunday-school class, by Mrs. J. F. 

Humphrey 120 

Mt. Carmel, by Rev. D. D. Davies 12 00 

Pittston, by Rev. H. J. Whitby. 10 00 

Pittston and Exeter, by Rev. S. B. 

Cooper 3 23 

West Bangor, by Rev. J. Cadwalader.. 2 00 
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— $150.00. 
Washington, Ralph Dunning, by C. A. 

Boardman 125 00 

Ladies' H. M. Soc. of First Ch., for 
Woman's fund for Missionary sala- 
ries 25 00 



MARYLAND— $6.00. 

Frostburg, by Rev. W. C. Jones $C 00 

VIRGINIA— $25.00. 

Buckner's Station, G. Clendon 25 00 

NORTH CAROLINA— £1. no. 

Wilmington, Miss A. E. Farrington 100 

ARKANSAS— $5.iU). 

Siloam Springs, by Rev. V. E. Loba 5 00 

FLORIDA— $38.50. 

Interlachen, by Rev. J. McKean 5 00 

Jacksonville, by Rev. 8. F. Gale 28 50 

Orange City, by Rev. S. V. McDuffee. . . 5 00 

INDIAN TERRITORY— $530.38. 
Caddo, Proceeds of sale of Ch. property, 
less amount of Loan paid Am. Cong. 

Union 52138 

Doaksviile, by Rev. A. Gross 3 00 

McAllister, by Rev. G. H. Brown 6 00 

OHIO— $282.90. 
Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser: 

Ashtabula, First $14 24 

Cn-ster 8 87 

Grafton, by Rev. E. A. Hoff- 
man 6 86 

29 97 

Received by S. P. Churchill, 
Treas. Cleveland Bohemian 
Board, June: 

Cleveland, First $18 16 

First, Y. P. S. C. E 3 25 

Jennings Avenue Ch 16 00 

Special 10 00 

Painesviile,Lake Erie Seminary 

Miss. Soc 20 90 

Ohio W. H. M. U., special.... 98 39 

166 61 

Cleveland, by Rev. E. C. Scoville 3 50 

Cortland and Hartford, by Rev. G. C. 

Jewell 13 44 

Etnavdle, by Rev. W. Lewis 12 00 

Hampden, by Rev. H. A. N. Richards.. 10 00 

Painesville, First, by G. H. Higgins 26 60 

Randolph, W. J. Dickinson 10 00 

Rollersville, $2; West Millgrove, $2.78, 

by Rev. J. C. Thompson 4 78 

Troy, First, by J. W. Fox, Jr 6 00 

INDIANA— $36.52. * 

Indianapolis, Female Cent Soc. of the 

Mayflower Cong. Ch., by Mrs. E. D. 

Grover 16 la 

Kokomo, $6; Liber. $s.50; Westchester, 

$3.4 0, by Rev. J. R. Preston 1790 

Macksville, by Rev. J. Hayes 2 50 

MISSOURI— $395.34. 

Brookfleld, by A. M. Eastman 19 80 

Cameron, by Rev. G. T. Holcombe. ... 15 88 
Kansas City, Y. P. S. C. E., by Rev. H. 

C. Scotf ord 25 00 

Kidder, by Rev. J. M. Bowers 15 30 

La Grange, by Rev. J. Reuth 5 00 

Lenhart, by Rev. C. M. Schwarzauer... 2 50 
Republic, Birthday offerings from Sun- 
day-school, by T. N. Merrill 3 86 

St. Louis, Pilgrim Ch., by G. L. Day 300 00 

By Rev. F. C. Woodard . . 7 o» 

Neosho, Ladies, by Mrs. H. A. Brown, 

Treas. W. H. M. Soc 1 00 

MICHIGAN— $1,034.67; of which Legacy, 
$500.00. 

Received by Rev. L. Warren: 

Solon $7 35 

Tawa3 City 2 90 

Union City, Dea. I. W. Clark.. 100 00 

Vermontville 5 vo 

Wheatland, Sunday-school 6 75 

^22 00 

Received by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, 
Treas. Woman's Home Miss. 
Union olMich.: 



238 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



September, 



Addison $5 03 

Allendale 10 00 

Almont 5 00 

Detroit, Ladies'Union, First Ch. 50 00 

Greenville IV 58 

Hud3on 7 00 

Laingsburg 1185 

Morenci 8 00 

Olivet, Ladies' Aid Soc 20 00 

Staunton .. 15 0T 

Vicksburg 15 00 

$164 50 

Received by Rev. C. F. Van Auken: 
C (lurches and Individuals 73 40 

Bangor, by Kev. A. B. Cochran 2 50 

Benzonia, $21.74; Homestead, $4.52, by 
Rev. O. B. Waters 26 26 

Canaudaigua, $9; Morenci, $5, by Rev. 
H.Coate 14 00 

Coldwater, Legacy of George H. Barber, 
by E. C. Baiber and CD. Wicker, Adm. 500 00 

FultoD, $10; Maple Rapids, $5, by Rev. 
W. H. Shannon 15 00 

Galesburgh, A Friend 76 79 

Ithaca, Rev. A. H. Norria 10 to 

$4.85; Lexington, S7 ; Michigan Cen- 
ter. $3.87, by Rev. E. P. Stone 15 22 

Manistee, by Rev. C. G. LuDdquist 3 GO 

Minden and White Rock, by Rev. W. 
Scurr 2 oo 

Ovid, by Rev. E. Hill 2 50 

Vanderbilt and Berryville, by Rev. J. 

W. Kanagy 7 50 

IOWA -$281. 07 ; of which Legacy, $241.57. 

Clinton, by Rev. G. E. Crisrofl'erson 4 50 

Des Moines, on accouut of Legacy of 
Mrs. Harriet L. Rollins, by S. A. Mer- 
rill, Adm 24157 

Plymouth Ch., by S. A. Merrill 30 0J 

La Motte, Mrs. E. A. Young and Mrs. 

A. McDole 5 00 

MINNESOTA— $702.50. 

Received by Rev. J. H. Morley: 

Faribault $37 65 

Lake City 21 57 

Minneapolis, Plymouth Ch 60 00 

Northtield, Friends 100 00 

Zumbrota 9 77 



i 228 99 

Received by Mrs. J. N. Cross, 

Treas. Minn. Woman's H. M. 

Soc: 

Alexandria, Woman's H. M. 
Soc, add'l 50 

Excelsior 1130 

Hancock 5 00 

Hutchinson, by Mrs. Rideout.. 100 

Minneapolis, Plymouth W. H. 
M. S., to const. Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Gale a L. M 80 00 

Plymouth, Y. H. M. S 18 50 

Second, Cn. W. M. S 20 00 

Open Door 1142 

NewRichland 3 00 

Springfield 1 35 

$152 07 381 06 

Ada, by Rev. S. Stone 7 00 

Appleton, $6.50; Graceville, $3.10, by 

Rev. J. T. Marvin 12 60 

Duluth, Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. E. M. 

Noyes 107 52 

Hawlev, by Rev. O. M.Smith 5 00 

Minneapol is, by Rev. G. H. Cate 8 03 

Montevideo, by Rev. R. P. Herrick 30 17 

Rushford, by Rev. W. W. Snell 8 31 

St. Cloud, First, by W. T. Clark 5 21 

St. Paul, by Rev. J. H. Chandler 44 50 

Plymouth Ch., by W. Burrows 38 00 

Sherburne and Triumph, by Rev. E. 

Carter 4 50 

Wadena and Verndale, by Rev. C. B. 

Fellow s 30 60 

Worthington, by Rev. D. Henderson... 20 00 



KANSAS— $323.86. 
Received by Rev. 'J. G. Dough- 
erty, Treas. Kan. H. M. Soc: 
Boston Mills, J. H. Hubbard... $20 00 

Fort Soott, First 1100 

Woman's Kan. H. M. Soc 50 oo 

$81 00 

Arvonia, by W. J. Jeremy 5 70 

Council Grove, bv Rev. L. Armsby 3 00 

Dial, $3.51; Bloomfield, $2.21, by Rev. F. 

G. McHenry 5 72 

Douglass, by Rev. G. Marsh 13 75 

Dover and Wakarusa, by Rev. L. H. 

Piatt ' 7 00 

Ellis, by Rev. C. E. Williams 10 00 

Emporia, First, by. f. F. Drake 128 61 

Fowler City, Montezuma and Crooked 

Creek, by Rev. T. D. Chiids 6 50 

Linwood and Lenape, by Rev. J. W. 

Spring 2 50 

Little River, by Rev. H. H. Gilchrist 3 75 

McPherson, by Rev. H. D. Herr 8 07 

North Topeka, by Rev. J. F. Bacon 33 70 

Plum Creek, by Mrs. H. Cashman 1 56 

Wakeleld, by Rev. R. Kerr 8 00 

Wellsvillc, by M. S. Parker 5 09 

NEBRASKA— $503.93. 
Received by Rev. J. L. Maile; 
Ashland, bv F. H. Chickering.. $11 30 
Columbus, by C. G. Hickok. . . . 1 00 
Omaha, First, add'l, by J. E. 

Wilbur 194 00 

First, by W. Fleming 25 00 

St. Mary's Avenue, by E. A. 

Mills 6 00 

Cherry Hill Ch., by Mrs. 

Maynard 1 50 

Osceola, by J. M. Bonner 1 50 

Received by Mrs. D. B. Perry: 

Lincoln 15 00 

Monroe 2 00 

Syracuse 10 00 

267 30 

Received by Rev. C. S. Billings; 

Churches and Individuals 148 65 

Campbell, by Rev. D. O. Smith 2 87 

Crete, by Rev. J. Schaerer 5 44 

Culbertson and Osborne, by Rev. J. 

Arnold '. 3 00 

Glencoe, $8.20; Dodge, $1.90, by Rev. 

W. D. J. Stevenson 10 10 

Greenwood, by Rev. H. A. French 20 00 

Lakeside, by Rev. J. P. Sparrow 10 00 

McCook, by Rev. W. Saess 7 55 

Naponee, by Rev. W. Woolman 3 17 

New Hope and Friedens, by Rev. G. 

Sclieuerle 3 00 

Princeton, by M. Peter ; 2 10 

Scribner, by Rev. M. B.Harrison 12 00 

Wahoo, by Rev. A. A. Cressman 3 75 

Wymore, by Rev. J. V. Dimon 5 00 

NORTH DAKOTA— $122.76 ; of which 
Legacy, $100.00. 
Cooperstown, $4.67; Woman's Miss. 

Soc, $3, by Rev. G. B. Frost $12 67 

D wight, Estate of Mrs. L. H. Porter, by 

Rev. S. F. Porter 

Grand Forks, by Rev. A. L. Gillette 

Sanborn, Mrs. J. W. Donaldson 

SOUTH DAKOTA— $68.79. 

Armour, by Rev. W. H. Thrall 

Dover, by Rev. J. H. Gurney 

Higbmore, by Rev. R. C. Walton 

Mitchell, by Rev. C. W. Wurrschmidt.. 

Plankiuton, by Rev. I. A. Shanton 

Ree Heights, by Rev. G. J. Battey 

SprinsrQeld, $4.8?; Running Water, 

70 cts., by Rev. C. Seccombe 

Webster, by Rev. W. G. Dickinson 

Willow Lake, by Rev. C. M. Daley 

Yankton, W. H. M. S.. $16; Myron,*V. 

H. M. S., $2.5", by Mrf. C. G. Black.,. IS 50 



oo oo 

9 09 
1 00 


$2 57 

4 81 

5 29 

5 25 

6 00 
5 41 


5 58 

7 00 

8 38 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



239 



COLORADO— $24.10. 

LoDgmont, First, by E. White $14 16 

Mauitou Springs, by Kev. E. J. Rtggs. . . 10 00 

WYOMING— $4.00. 
Big Horn, Beeton and Sheridan, by Rev. 
S. J.Jennings $4 00 

UTAH-$5.70. 

Park City, by Kev. I. R. Prior $2 70 

Salt Lake City. Plymouth Sunday-school, 
by Miss A. Baker 3 oo 

CALIFORNIA— $287.75. 

Berkeley, bv Rev. W. F. Bickford $5 00 

Fresno and Tulare, by Rev. J. C. Nagel. 10 75 

Mojave, by Rev. E. B. Howell 11 85 

Oakland, a member of Plymouth Ave. 

Ch 200 00 

Oceanside, by Rev. H. M. Daniels 3 00 

San Bernardino, by Rev. J. D. Foster.. 1 90 

San Jose, by Rev. C. W. Hill 25 00 

San Juan, by Kev. A. B. Palmer 12 50 

Sierre Madr'e, by Rev. L. H. Frary 15 25 

Sierra Valley, by Rev. E. S. Philbrook.. 2 00 

OREGON— $118.30. 

Astoria, by Rev. G. C. Hall $5 50 

Corvallis. by Rev. G. 11. Lee 5 00 

East Portland, bv Rev. D. Staver 21 35 

Portland, Rev. (i. H. Atchison, D.D.... 83 95 

Mrs. M. A. Smith 2 50 

WASHINGTON TERRITORY— $112,83. 
Endicott, $10.75; Lexington, $2.50, by 

Rev. N. F. Cobleigh $13 25 

Ritzville, bv Rev. G. H. Atkinson, D.D.. 7 50 
Ritzville and Endicott, by Rev. F. H. 

Fruiht 2 50 

Seattle, S. B. Vrooman 35 00 

Sprague, by Rev. F. McConaughy 5 00 

Tacoma, by Rev. B. Johanson 9 50 

Whatcom, by Rev. J. Wolfe 7 25 

15 216 95 
HOME MISSIONARY" ' 32 77 

$15,249 72 

Donations oj Clothing, etc. 

Brooklyn, N. Y., Ladies of the Church of 
the P'ilgrirns, by Mrs. L. W. Allen, cash 
and clothing $7S6 00 

Little Compton, R. I., Ladies' Sociable of 
United Ch., by Rev. W. D. Hart, barrel 
and f re ght 58 25 

Middlelield, Ct., A Friend, bundle. 

New Hiven, Ct., "Morris Cove Mission 
Circle," by Mrs. J. H. Morris, box and 
freight 33 38 

Newport, R. I., Ladies' Benev. Soc. of 
United Ch., by Mary A. Pritchard, box 
and freight 136 21 

New Y'ork City, Ladies' Home Miss. Soc. 
of Broadway Tabernacle, one baby or- 
gan. 
William Abbatt, bundle. 

Norwood, N. Y., Ladies' Soc, by Miss 
Mary F. Hale, box and freight 36 50 

Scotlaud, Ct., Ladies' Benev. Soc, by 
Rev. li. A. Bryan, barrel and freight.. . 31 02 

Washington, D. C, Ladies' Home Miss. 
Soc. of First Ch., by Lillian C. Whittle- 
sey, barrel 105 00 

Will'iamstown, Mass., Rev. J. Denison, 
bundle. 

Receipts of the Massachusetts Home Missionary So- 
ciety, in July, Rev. Edwin B. Palmer, Treas. 

Alford, by Rev. J. Jay Dana $6 30 

Andover, Free Christian Ch., to const. 
Minnie C. Cole and Carrie A. Palmer L. 

Ms 84 10 

In memorian 30 00 



Arlington, Orthodox, by Robt. A. Ware.. $50 00 

Bank Balance, Interest on 77 76 

Bernardston, A thank ottering, from Mr. 

J. P. C 3 00 

By Henry Slate 11 50 

Boston, c. & Co., for Mrs. M. E. Drake, 

Iroquois, Dak 15 00 

Miss Carter 1 00 

Dorchester, Second, by Miss E. Tolman 126 03 

Dorchester, Village, by a. C. Hawes 17 50 

For Bohemian Kund 17 50 

Ladies" Home Miss. Soc, by Miss J. K. 
Wighl, to const. Miss Mary Tucker a 

L. M 41 00 

East, Maverick Ch., branch Sewing- 
school, for Bohemian work ... 100 

Roxbury, Eliot, Mis. Dr. Rufus Ander- 
son, by A. McLean 5 00 

Wtst, Mrs. E. A. Kingsbury, by J. H. 

Guild 5 00 

So. Evan , by J. H. Guild 52 42 

South, Phillips, by O. J. Lincoln 100 00 

Brighton, Cheerful Workers, for Mrs. M. 

E. Drake, Iroquois. Dak 20 00 

Brookline, Harvard, by H. B. Eager 68 45 

Cambridge, A. E. Hildreth Est., Annuity 

for A. H. M. S 500 00 

Teacher 20 00 

Centerville, Kev. Win. Leonard 10 00 

Chatham, by G. S. Atwood 7 25 

Chelsea, A Friend, A., for Rev. Chas. L. 

McKesson, Parsons, Kan 5 00 

B., for Rev. Chas. L. McKesson, Par- 
sons, Kan 20 00 

Central, by Azel Ames 10 40 

Concord, Trim , by Thomas Todd 2 03 

Boston, cont. for Rev. E. H. Stickney, 

Harwood. Dak 5 00 

Dana, by Rev. J. G. Willis 1 50 

Dedhcm, First, by C. Guild 177 36 

England, Miss S. L. Ropes, by J. S. Ropes 10 00 

Falmouth, First, by Rev. H. K. Craig 11 66 

Fitchburtt, C. C, by Wm. K. Bailey 50 00 

Gloucester, Evan., by Joseph O. Proctor. 60 00 
Hampden Benev. Assoc, by Chas. 
Marsh, Tr.: 

Chicopee, Third $24 09 

Holvoke, Second, to const. Mrs. 
Mary L. Chapin, Mrs. Ellen S. 
Clark and Mrs. S. W.Newton L. 

Ms. of the A. H. M.S 194 33 

Huntington, Second 13 15 

Longmeadow, East 58 00 

Monson . . 30 53 

Palmer, Second 50 00 

Springfield, South 140 46 

West, First 41 00 

Park St 523 32 

1,074 8S 

Hardwick,Calvinistic, by Rev.C. M.Pierce 10 00 
Haverhill, Center, by Ezra Kelly, to const. 

Harry E. Bean a L. M 100 00 

West, Ladies' Benev. Soc, by H. S. 

Webster 17 50 

Hay den ville, by C. D. Waite 15 00 

Hea;h, by Rev. B. B. Cutler 5 Oo 

Hinsdale, by C. J. Klttredge 8 36 

Hubbardston, by Alden Pollard 40 59 

Hyde Park, by J. Ellery Piper, special, for 
No. Cheyenne, Dak., Mission Chapel... 19 25 

Jessup, Fund, income of.. 150 00 

Lawrence, South, by Dea. J. Y. Buzzell.. 7 09 
Lexington, Hancock, by Dea. Walter 

Baker 26 00 

Medwav, Village, by RevivR. K. Harlow. 50 52 

Milibufy, First, by L. L. Whitney 41 30 

Milton, First Evan., Two friends, bv Rev. 

A. K. Teele 10 00 

New Bedford, Trim, by R. G. Tobey 179 13 

Newbury, First, mon. con. coll., by Kev. 

F. W. Sanborn 11 54 

Newburvport, Belleville, add'l, by Rev. 

D. T. Fiske, D.D : 5 00 

Fourth, by Chas. A. Bliss 13 46 

North, by J. B. Creasey 30 76 

Newton, Eliot , by D. E. Snow 75 00 



240 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



September, 1887. 



Mission Circle, by Mrs. E. C. Davis, for 

Children's Bohemian fund 

Center, by Chas. H. Bennett 

North Adams, First, by Wm. F. West 

Northampton, Edwards, Benev. Soc., by 
S. D. Drury 

North Brookfield, First, by A. G. Stone... 

Orleans, by Dea. J. Higgins 

Pittsfleld, First, by Frank W. Dutton 

©uincy, Point, by Geo. A. Sidelinger 

Randolph, First, by Rev. J. C. Labaree. . . 

Rockport.by Z. A. Appleton 

Mrs. Eliza Whipple, by Rev. R. B. How- 
ard 

Shrewsbury, by L. N. Smith, to const. 
Rev. F. H. Allen a L. M 

South Hadley, First, by L. M. Gaylord — 

Spencer, Class 26 in S.8., by Mrs. S. A. 
Temple, for Rev. H. A. Schauffler's Bo- 
hemian work 

Springfield, Thank-offering, First-fruits. 

Sterling, by Rev. John E. Bodge 

Uxbridge, Evan., by W. W. Thayer 

Watertown, Phillips, by J. Q. A. Pierce.. 

Wellfleet, First, by Simeon Atwood & Co. 

West Brookfield, by C. T . H untington .... 
Young People's Mission Circle, for Chil- 
dren's Bohemian Fund 

Westhampton, by A. D. Montague 

Westport, Pacific Union S.S., by J. C. 
Macomber 

Weymouth, South, Second, by Rev. H. C. 
Alvord 

Whitin, J. C. fund, Income of 

Whitman, A friend, to const. Jason Her- 
sey a L. M. of A. H. M. S 

Winchester, add'l, by Eugene Tappan. . . . 

Worcester, Piedmont, by Wm. Wood- 
ward 

Plymouth, by Jonas White, to const. 
Rev. Chas. Wads worth a L. M 



$10 no 


149 93 


61 44 


148 0T 


100 00 


25 00 


125 00 


5 20 


229 24 


17 5T 


3 00 


57 52 


27 00 



12 50 
22 00 
36 02 
40 00 
134 08 
21 30 
26 65 

5 00 
26 00 



49 00 
120 00 



50 00 
20 00 



40 00 
140 00 



Home Missionary. 



$5,210 91 
3 00 



$5,213 91 
Errat a —June No., page 79, column 1: 

lor " MUles" read Millis. 
Against Springfield, South, for "$157.40" 

read $157.46. 

Donations of Clothing, etc., received and reported at 

the rooms of the Mass. Home Miss. Soc., in July. 

Leominster, Ladies, by Gertrude H. Fel- 

ton, 1 barrel $74 11 

Receipts of the Missionary Society of Connecticut, 
in July, Ward W. J acobs, Treas. 

Barkhamsted, by Rev. J. B. Clarke $3 00 

Berlin, Kensington, by E A . Cole 25 00 

Canterbury, by T.G.Clarke 5 30 

Chatham, Cobalt, by Rev. F. D. Chan- 
dler T 13 

Farmliurton, by Frederick C. Jones 53 06 

FairaeTa, Southport, Elbert B. Monroe, 

$25; Mrs. E. B. Monroe, $15 40 00 

Hartford, South, Young People's Soc, by 

O. H.Clark 2 50 

Fourth, by Mrs. J. O. Parsons, $23.25; 

for A. H. M. S.,$23 46 25 

WethersfieldAve.,by R.S.Burt 30 16 

Kent, by John Hopson, for A. H. M. S... 22 22 

Lyme, Grassy Hill, by J. S. Hall 19 35 

Middletown, First, by R. H. Strothart. ... 159 65 
Montville, by Henry A. Baker, for work 

in the West 23 48 

New Canaan, by H. B. Rogers 54 15 

Norfolk, by J . N . Cowles, $200; Robbins 

Battell, $25; Anna Battell, $25 250 00 

Norwich, First, by Lewis A. Hyde, $25 of 

which is from Lewis A.Hyde 140 00 

Broadway, by S. B. Bishop 200 00 

Putnam, Second, by H. N. Fenn 15 39 

Salisbury, by Rev. J. C. Goddard 12 95 

Southington, by J. F. Pratt 12 00 

Plantsville, by E. P. Hotchkiss 188 73 



Thomaston, by P. Darrow $26 60 

Vernon, Rockville, First, by E. C. Chap- 
man, $150 of which from Dea. J. N. 
Stickney, to const. John K. Creevey, 
David I. Carsonand Daniel F.Andrews, 

all of Rockville, Ct.,L. Ms 243 43 

Second, George Maxwell 100 00 

Waterbury, Second, by B. G. Bryan 140 00 

Windsor Locks, by J. H. Hayden m 91 

Wolcott, by S. L. Hotchkiss s 00 

Woman's Cong. H. M. Union of Connect- 
icut, by Mrs. S. M. Hotchkiss 10 00 

$1,950 26 

Receipts of the Illinois Home Missionary Society, in 
June and July, Aaron B. Mead, Treas. 

Algonquin $2 00 

Ashkuni, Sen. and Junior Miss. Soc's 1 90 

Avon 11 27 

Cenrralia, special 8 05 

Chebanse 6 86 

Chesterfield, special 37 06 

Chicago, First 100 oo 

Plymouth 108 00 

New England 41 64 

Lincoln Park, Woman's Miss. Soc 45 85 

Soutk, W. H. Miss. Union 35 00 

Lake View, special io 75 

Immanuel 5 00 

Creston 12 00 

Danvllie, Mrs. A. M. Swan 5 00 

DeKalb, special 6 00 

Dongola, for supply 49 55 

Farmington 53 63 

Galesburg, Miss Gertrude Wyckoff, spe- 
cial 2 00 

Grldley, Y. P. Miss. Soc 15 00 

Hamilton, Union Miss. Concert 5 20 

Hennepin 5 88 

Hillsboro, special 5 00 

Hinsdale 30 00 

Illim, Woman's Miss. Soc 10 31 

Joy Prairie, Sunday-school 7 00 

Kemper, special 32 00 

Kewanee 95 61 

Special 15 00 

Lanark, W. H. Miss. Union 6 00 

Lawn Ridge 17 92 

Leyden Center 150 

Ludlow, Mrs. Margaret Y. Gourley 40 00 

Lyndon 10 00 

LyonsvUle, Sunday-school 11 65 

Marine, special 27 00 

Mendon, Sunday-school 10 00 

Morgan Park, special 16 15 

Morris 29 65 

Mount Forest 2193 

New Grand Chain 12 74 

Oak Park, Young Men's Miss. Soc 15 00 

Olmstead 8 13 

Olney, special 6 00 

Ottawa, Legacy of Henry W. Gridley, by 

Dr. H. W. Hopkins 50 00 

Paxton 40 00 

Payson 14 44 

Peru, special 13 00 

Princeton 55 50 

Quincy, First Union 200 10 

Rockferd, Second Oh., W. H. M. Union 5 75 

Seward, Winnebago Co 39 50 

Stark, W. H. M. Union, for Bohemian 

work 3 50 

Streator, Bridge St. Church 6 19 

Sycamore, Warren Peters 5 00 

Thawville, Children's Mission Band.. 1 .... 3 00 

Ladies' Miss. Soc 2 00 

Tbomasboro, " R" 4 00 

Jllin, for supply 54 00 

Waukegan 8 60 

Rev . Henry Willard, Chicago 20 00 

Rev. Albert Ethridge, special 10 00 

Rev. George H. Smith 5 00 

Mrs. George H . Smith 2 50 

$1,537 23 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



THE "MANHATTAN" 

OF JNEW YORK, 

156 and 158 Broadway, 

" All men tbink all men mortal but themselves," but there is nothing like a spell 
of sickness to shake one's confidence in the stability of his health and the permanency of 
physical life. We seem somehow to entertain (vaguely, it may be) the idea that an 
insurance may be very properly safely deferred until there are Dremonitions of declining 
bealth. This is like waiting for a fire to occur iti your neighborhood and then running to 
8?ek fire insurance when the conflagration is threatening your own house. It is too late 
then to get insurance. The bitter reflection: "It might have been," may then be timely 
enough ; but wishes have no power on that day to evoke from the ashes the presence of the 
protective policy to restore the property lost by our folly. 

Take insurance on your life now. The new plan of the Manhattan will not only eover 
the contingency of death, but be a saving fund for yourself, to be resorted to in your ad- 
vanced age. 

JAMES M. McKEAN, President. 

J. L, HALSEY, 1st Vice-Prest. H. B. STOKES, 2d Vice-Prest. 
H. Y. WEMPLE, Secretary. S. N. STEEBINS, Actuary. 

AGENTS WANTED.— Active, reliable, and persevering men who desire agencies in the 
State of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana. Illinois, Iowa, and Missouri are invited to 
correspond with the company direct. 




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everywhere. Send for Circular. 

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MARSHALL FIELD & CO. CHICAGO, 

WHOLESALE WESTERN ACFKNTS. 



Cincinnati bell Foundry Go 



SUCCESSORS IN BLYMYER BELLS TO THE 

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CATALOGUE WITH 1800 TESTIMONIALS. 



E! LS. CHU RCH.SCHOOL .FIRE ALARM 



Notice to Advertisers. 

All letters, orders or communications in 
reference to advertising in The Home Mis- 
sionary, should be addressed to H. S. 
Chandler, Advertising Manager, No. 251 
Broadway, New York. 



THE INDEPENDENT. 

" One of the ablest weeklies in existence."—- Pa" ^all Gazette, London, England. 

" The most influential religious organ in the States."— The Spectator, London, Erg- 
land 

Clearl T stands in the fore-front as a weekly religious magazine'"— Sunday- 
school Times, Philadelphia. 

It is a Newspaper, Magazine, and Review all in ore. It is a religions, a literary, an educa- 
tional, a story, an art, a scientific, an agricultural, a financial, and a political paper ccmbinec. 
has thirty-two folio pages and twenty-two departments. 

No matter what a person's religion, politics, or profession may be, no n atter ■what his age, (m 
ployment or condition may be, THE INDEPENDENT will prove a help, an instructor, an coucaior 

Its yearly subscription is $3.i 0, or two years for $5.(0. 

A month's " Trial Trip," thirty cents 

Specimen copies, and prospectus for 1SST, sent free to any address on receipt of postal card. 

THE INDEPENDENT, 

P. O. Box 2787 1 251 BROADWAY, N. Y 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



The Independent. 

THE LAEGEST, THE ABLEST, THE BEST 

RELIGIOUS AND LITEEAEY NEWSPAPER 

IN THE WORLD. 



" One of the ablest weeklies in exist- 
ence." — Pall Mall Gazette, London, 
England. 

" The most influential religious organ 
in the States."— The Spectator, London, 
England. 

" Clearly stands in the fore-front as a 
weekly religious magazine." — Sunday- 
School Times, Philadelphia, Penn. 



IT IS A 



Religious, Literary, Educa 
tional, Art, Story, Finan- 
cial, Insurance, Scien- 
tific, Political, Ag- 
ricultural, Sun- 
day-School 



A GREAT 
COMBINATION. 




Both for j^60.00. 



DIMENSIONS: Height. NEW improved high 
74in.;Depth,24in.;Length arm, new mechanical 
45 in.; Weight, boxed, 360 principles and rotary 
movements, automatic, 
direct and perfect action 
cylinder shuttle,self-aet- 



ing needle, positive feed, 
no springs, few parts, 
minimum weight.no fric- 
tion, no noise, no wear.no 
fatigue, no "tantrums," 
capacity unlimited, al- 
ways in order, richly or- 
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and gives perfect satis- 
faction. 



lbs. 

This Handsome 
Parlor Organ. 5 Oc- 
taves, containing 
Four Sets of Reeds, 
Nine Stops, Two 
Knee Swells, Price,' 
$90 00. 

Elegance of Finish.Elas- 
ticity of Touch. Pipe-like 
Tone. Originality of De- 
sign, Beauty of style. 

Having perfected arrangements for the purpose 
of introduction, with the manufacturers of the above 
Organs and Sewing Machines, which are listed at 
$90.00 and $fi0.00 respectively, we are able to offer 
both at the price of the Sewing Machine, $60.00. Both 
fully guaranteed satisfactory or money refunded. 
Address for further particulars, or call and examine 
at the warerooms of the Sewing Machine and Or- 
gan Association, 

(From the Christian at Work.) 

Wk hereby call the attention of our patrons to the 
sewing machine and parlor organ combination, by 
which both of these valuable articles (which every 
well-ordered home finds so indispensable) are of- 
fered at the price of an ordinary sewing machine. 
The reference given, that of the Alford & Berkele 
Co., is sufficient with us to believe that the Com- 

Eany will do as they say. We consider it one of the 
est offers ever made in this direction. 

F. C. CANDEE «fe CO., Sole Agents, 

No. 7 W. 14th Street, New York City. 
Reference, THE ALFORD & BERKELE CO., 
P. O. Box 2002. 77 Chambers Street. 



NEWSPAPER. 



It has more and abler Contributors than any three of its contemporaries. It 
stands in the front rank of journalism, and every person of intelligence should 
read it. 

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION. 



One Month $ 30 

Three Months 75 

Four Months 1 00 

Six Months 1 50 

Nine Months 2 25 



One Year $3 00 

Two Years 5 00 

Three Years 7 00 

Four Years 8 50 

Five Years 10 00 



Send Postal Card for a Free Sample Copy, and Clubbing List if you wish to 
subscribe for any Magazines or other Newspapers at less than Publishers' Prices. 
THE INDEPENDENT, 251 Broadway, New York. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



THE 



UNITED STATES 

Life Insurance Company, 

IP* THE CITY OE NEW YORK. 
(Organized in I860.) 

261, 262 and 263 BROADWAY 

New York, 



OEO. H. BURFORD, President. 
C. P\ FRALEIGH, Secretary. 

A. WHEELWRIGHT, Ass't See. 



All Policies henceforth issued are incontestable for any cause 
after three years. 

Death Claims paid at once as soon as satisfactory proofs are 
received at the Home Office. 

Absolute Security, combined with the largest liberality, assures 
the popularity and success of this Company. 



ALL FORMS OF TONTINE POLICIES ISSUED 



THE HOME MISSIONABY. 



Stranger than Fiction! 



■ 

{From The Independent, February 24, 1887.) 

The Forty-second Annual Report of the NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE 
COMPANY furnishes a superb illustration of the old adage that ' ' fact is stranger 
than fiction." Few people can realize the full extent of the meaning of figures, 
and particularly of such tremendous figures as are presented in the report of the 
NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY. They are, in fact, stupendous. 
They are, too, of such wonderful collateral interest to so many hundreds of 
thousands of people in this country, so many moro in fact, than are directly 
and intimately concerned in the policies issued by this Company, that every 
reader of The Independent should carefully scan the statement, and endeavor 
to understand it fully. To aid slightly in this, we desire to call attention to a 
few facts and prominent points of the statement. 

And, first, it will be noted that the net cash assets of the Company on the 
first day of January, 1887, amounted to $75,421,453.37. If these were the figures 
reported by the United States Government, giving the totals of some of its great 
financial operations, it would not be quite so startling ; but when taken in con- 
nection with a corporation of the State of New York, the figures are wonder- 
fully large. The Company's surplus by the New York State standard, 4£ per 
cent., is $15,549,319. It has 97,719 policies in force, insuring $304,373,540. It 
should be noted that, during the last year, the Company received nearly a mill- 
ion dollars more from interest and rents than it was called upon to pay for death- 
claims, and that it paid for dividends, annuities and purchased policies, $4,- 
311,119.11. 

It should be borne in mind that the policy-holders of the NEW YORK LIFE 
INSURANCE COMPANY, are the NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE COM- 
PANY ; they are members of a great co-partnership, in which the interests of all 
are alike and in common. Whatever is for the success of the NEW YORK 
LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY, is, therefore, for the success of every 
memher — that is, every policy-holder of the Company — and whatever benefits 
accrue to the NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY accrue to the pol- 
icy-holders thereof, and their equitable share will be received by them in one 
way or another. 

With such a magnificent past as the NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE 
COMPANY has had, with its tremendous increase in everything that 
goes to make up a great financial institution, its possibilities and prob- 
abilities in the future are hardly to be conceived. But side by side with its possi- 
bilities and probabilities roll the great beneficent factors of life insurance. 
Happy the man who avails himself of its advantages. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 

This Monthly is furnished at sixty cents a year, postage paid. The subscription price 
could not well he less. Its whole present issue should go to actual subscribers. But, unless they 
prefer to pay, it will be sent free, as heretofore, to Life Directors and Life Members ; Mis- 
sionaries of the Society and its Auxiliaries ; Ministers securing a yearly collection for it in 
their congregations ; also, to every individual, Association, or Congregation, one copy for 
every ten dollars collected and paid over to the Society or an Auxiliary. Suitable name 
ihould accompany the payment. Pastors are earnestly requested to serve Home Missions by 
promoting the use of this Journal at the Monthly Concert and among their people. 

Immediate notice of the discontinuance or change of pc^t-office address should be given. 

APPLICATIONS FOR A1I>. 

Congregations desiring aid should apply at once after finding a minister. They should 
make a full statement of the facts in their condition and prospects which justify an applica- 
tion. They should also give thsse particulars, viz. : 

Population of the place. 

Names of the church or churches, and preaching stations 

Number of church-members. 

Average of congregation. 

Denomination and size of contiguous congregations. 

Names and distances of the nearest Congregational churches. 

Minister's full name and post-office address : Town, County, State 

Does he reside on his field of labor? Is he installed pastor? 

Has he any other calling than that of the ministry? 

Of what local church is he a member ? 

Of what Ministerial Association? 

The number of persons composing his family. 

Total amount of salary proposed. 

Amount pledged by the people and how secured. 

Has he, also, the use of a parsonage ? 

Is aid expected from any, other source ? 

The least amount that will suffice from the A. H. M. 8. 

The amount received from this Society last year. 

Will less probably be needed next year? 

Amount contributed to this Society last year. How raised. 

Amount contributed to other benevolent societies. 

Additional statements concerning the condition, prospects, and wants of the field. 

Date of the desired commission. 

The application must be signed by the officers of t!ie .hurch, where there is one, and by 
the trustees or a committee of the congregation. 

If the ecclesiastical body, within whose Unfits the congregation is found, has a " Com- 
mittee of Missions," the members of that committee should certify these statements, the stand- 
ing of the minister, his prospects of usefulness there, and indorse the application. If no 
Buch " Committee of Missions " exists, the application should be indorsed by two or more 
neighboring clergymen acquainted with the facts. If no church or congregation is yet 
athered, applicants will follow the same course, as far as practicable. 

Applications, after being so indorsed, should be sent to the Superintendent (or Secretary 
of the Auxiliary) for the region where the applicants reside. 

Appropriations, as a rule, bear the date of a punctual application ; and they never cover 
more than one year. If further aid be needed, a new application is required, containing al 
the particulars named above, and indorsed as before. To this the certificate of the missionary 
that the congregation has fulfilled its previous pledges for his support, must be added. 

For the address of Superintendents and Secretaries of Auxiliaries, see p. 4 of cover. 

FORM OF A BEQUEST. 

I bequeath to my executors the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay over the same 

after rov decease, to the person who. when the same is payable, shall act 

as Treasurer of the American Home Missionary bociny, orined in the City of New York, in 

the year eighteen V-virirod and twenty-six, to be applied to the charitable uses and purposes 

of said Society, and undei its direction. 



SEPTEMBER. 



lSS'T. 



AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 

Bible House, Astor Place, New York. 

Rev. DAVID B. COE, D.D., Honorary Secretary. 

Rev. WALTER M. BARROWS, D.D.,> Q , . - „ 

Rev. JOSEPH B. CLARK, D. D., j 8ecre t a ™» for Correspondence. 

Rev. ALEX'R H. CLAPP. D.D., Treasurer. 
Executive Committee :— Mr. JOHN WILEY, Chairman; Mr. WM. HENRY SMITH ; Rev. WM. M. 
TAYLOK, D.D.; Mr. CHARLES H. PARSONS; Mr. ALFRED S. BARNES : Mr. ALBERT WOODRUFF; 
GEO. P. SHELDON, Esq.; Rev. JAMES G. ROBERTS, D.D.; Rev. SAMUEL H. VIRGIN, D.D.; Mr. 
HEKBEKT M. DIXON; Rev. A. J. F. BEHRENDS, D.D. : Rev. ROBERT R. MEREDITH, D.D.; Mr. 
FRANCIS FLINT; WM. IVES WASHBURN, Esq., Recording Sec. 

COMMUNICATIONS 

Relating to the general business of the Society may be addressed to either of the Secretaries f(r 

Correspondence. 
Communications relating to the Woman's Department may be addressed to 

Mrs. H. M. Shelton, Bible House. N. X. 
C )mmunications relating to the Editorial Department of The Home Missionary, may be addressed to 

Mrs. H. S. Caswell, Bible House, N. Y. 

DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS, 

In Drafts, Checks, Registered Letters, or Post- Office Orders; also Communications relating to the 
businpss matters of The Home Missionary and other Publications of the Society, may be ad- 
dressed to Alex'r H. Clapp, Treasurer, Bible House, Astor Place, New York. 

Post-Offlce Orders should be drawn on STATION I>, New York City. 

A Payment of $50 constitutes a Life Member, 

SUPERINTENDENTS. 

Rev. Henry A. Schauffleb, Work among Bohemians. Poles, etc.. Cleveland, O. 

Rev. Moritz E. Eversz, Work among Germans, Cbicago. III. 

Rev. M. W. Montgomery, Work among Scandinavians, Minneapolis, Minn. 



Rev. Leboy Warren, 
Rev. Edw. D. Curtis, 
Rev. S. F. Gale, 
Rev. J. H. Mobley, 
Rev. Franklin B. Doe, 
Rev. Addison Blanohabd, 



Rev. C. C. Otis. 



Lansing. Mich. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Topeka, Kan. 

N. Mex. 



Rev. John L. Maile. 
Rev. Hiram D. Wiard, 
Rev. H. C. Simmons, 
Rev. C. M. Sanders, 
Rev. W. S Hawk.es, 
J. H. Warren, D.D., 
G. H. Atkinson, D.D., 



Seattle, Wash. Ter.— Rev. Geo. A. Hood, 



Omaha, Neb. 

Mitchell, Dak. 

Fargo, No. Dak. 

Denver, Col. 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Portland, Or. 

Ashland, Wis. 



SECRETARIES AND TREASURERS 



OF THE 

Rev. Jonathan E. Adams, Secretary, 

John L. Crosby, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev. Edward H. Greeley, D.D., Secretary, 

Hon. Lyman D. Stevens, Treasurer, 

Rev. Charles S. Smith, Secretary, 

J. C. Emery, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev. Joshua Coit, Secretary, 

Rev. Edwin B. Palmer, Treasurer, 

Rev. Alexander McGregor, Secretary, 

Edwin Barrows, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev. William H. Moore, Secretary, 

Ward W. Jacobs, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev. Chables C. Cbeegan, D.D., Secretary, 

Alex'b H. Clapp, Treasurer, 

Rev. J. G. Fraser, Secretary, 

Alex'r H. Clapp, Treasurer, 

Rev. James Tompkins, Secretary, 

Aaron B. Mead, Esq., Treasurer, 

Bev. T. G. Grassie, Secretary, 

It. A. McCollodgh, Esq., Treasurer, 

Rev. T. O. Douglass, Secretary, 

3. H. Merrill. Esq., Treasurer 



AUXILIARIES. 

Maine Miss. Soc, 



Bangor, Me. 

" " Bangor, Me. 

N~. Hamp. Home Miss. Soc, Concord, N. H. 

" " Concord, N. H. 

Vermont Bom. " Montpelier, Vt. 

" " Montpelier, Vt. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, ) 22 Cong. Housr, 



Rhode lsVd " " 

(1 II Hi 

Miss. Soc. of Conn., 

it ii 

New York H. M. Soc, 

it i «i 

Ohio ' • " 

ii (i ii 

Illinois " " 

II 41 II 

Wis. " " 

ii .i ii 

Iowa " " 



Boston, Mass. 
Pawtucket, R. I. 
Providence. Ii. I. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
New York City. 
Cleveland, Ohic. 
New York City. 
151 Washington. 
St., Chicago, 111. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Grinnell, la. 
Des Moines. la. 




->;£/£/ 



Home Missionary. 



<)( TOUEK. 1887, 



CONTENTS 



be treasury 2-11 

ospel exg'ne 243 

iast repair 213 

- 213 

BOD ] X VESTM ENTS 21-1 

ESSOUP.F 211 

•AT EVENING TIME." 217 

VN ADDRESS 21S 

'PORTUNITY 252 

r.-IN 254 

BE • BALD KNJBBERS." 256 

■PERIENCE INTERPRETING 

BCHTPTURE 257 

'OT X PER-ATTRACTIONS 2.58 

tWARNING 260 

?HE FIRST CONGREGATIONAL 

CHU RCH IN THE STATE 261 

V - HOME-MADE" NEWSPAPER... 262 
BCONFESSION 263 



WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT 263 

Resignation or Mrs. Shelton 263 

Six Points 264 

Mrs. Jones's Picture 265 

A Vi »ice Krom Florida 267 

A Significant Letter 368 

OUR YOUNG PEOPLE 269 

Letter No. 11.— A Bohemian Picnic... 269 

Doesn't Want to Read 271 

Questions and Answers 271 

A Bey'.- Letter From Dakota 272 

The Work at Hanrl. -V 273 

CHILDREN'S BOHEMIAN FUND.... 274 
W( I.MAX'S FUND FOR MISSIONS RY 

SALARIES 274 

MISSIONARY BOXES 274 

WOMAN'S STATE HOME MISSION- 
ARY ORG ANIZATIONS 375 

APPOIN I M EXTS 275 

RECEIPTS 276 



Vol. LX. No. 6. 



NEW YORK. 
AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

BTBLE^HOCSE, AST02 PLACE. 



SIXTY CENTS A TEAK, IN ADVANCE, POSTAGE PAID 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 

Go Pkeaoh the Gospel Mark xvi. 15. 

How shall they preach except they be sent ? Iiom./x. 15. 

VOL. LX. OCTOBER, 1887. No. 6. 



THE TREASURY. 

It is still telling - the same old story of summer drought in receipts, 
of spring freshets in demands upon what is not there, and of borrowing 
at the banks, by the Society's orders, to meet those demands. By the 
time this number reaches our friends, many of them will have returned 
from their summer vacations. It may seem to them a little ungracious 
to be met on the threshold of their homes by a call for money, when for 
some weeks they may have been hearing little else. They will remem- 
ber, however, that in the health and vigor of themselves and their fami- 
lies, the summer's outlay has paid well. Can they doubt that the cost 
of redeeming pledges made in their name to the toiling Home Mission- 
aries, many of whom have wrought steadily all the summer through, 
will pay better still? 

It will be no holiday pastime for the friends of Home Missions to 
make good a whole summer's deficiencies, while supplying at the rate 
of $1,000 a day the needful for carrying on the work that must be done. 
Our brethren in the ministry and the churches will easily see that they 
cannot too soon set on foot their measures for meeting this just claim. 
The borrowing process cannot honestly be carried on indefinitely ; the 
missionaries cannot and must not wait long for what they have so nobly 
earned; the credit of the churches with business men must not be dis- 
honored. There is but one way out ; and that is, for the friends of the 
cause to make immediate and liberal provision for the payment of the 
debt incurred by their order, and for carrying on the work now in hand. 

Special thanks are due to those who have cheerfully responded to 
our recent calls, as will be seen by a glance at the acknowledgments of 
receipts on the last pages of this issue. A good number of churches 
and individuals have given generously; several executors have hastened 
the payment of legacies; and the ever-ready old Massachusetts Auxili- 
ary has come to the rescue with more than $9,000. We are sure that 
many more, knowing the Society's need, will come to its aid as cheer- 
fully and promptly. It is the Master's work, and they who love Him 
will count it a privilege to lend a hand in pushing it forward. 



242 THE home missionary. October, 

How to help. — That there is an increasing interest among the women 
of our land in the matter of Home Evangelization, is evident from the 
frequent inquiry: "How can we help this woik most effectively?'' We 
recognize wdth grateful acknowledgment the efficient service rendered 
to Home Missions by women as individuals and societies. They minis- 
ter nobly to the Home Missionary through well-filled boxes; they 
stimulate his brain and deepen his spiritual life by gifts of valuable 
literature; they build a house of worship for his flock, and a parsonage 
for himself. All this is necessary to Christian growth in a new settle- 
ment. But the most earnest efforts for the upbuilding of that Zion at 
" the front" are of no avail if the watchman be not fapt upon the walls 
thereof, to proclaim to the people the vital words of truth and life, and 
provided with the wherewithal to live. For this, which is his due, he 
looks to the treasury of the American Home Missionary Society; and 
for this, the Society looks to the Church of Christ. 

While we ask that godly woman whl go forward with unabated zeal 
in these important branches of work, we beg to lay before them the ur- 
gent need of money in the treasury with which to pay the faithful Home 
Missionary watchman his due. Do we need to tell wide-awake women,, 
who have wise ways of their own, how they may help to lift this burden 1 ? 
A suggestion or two, however, may not come amiss. 

The average appropriation for a missionary salary is $500. One 
woman who has been intrusted with a large stewardship, may easily 
keep one Home Missionary upon a needy field. . Through self-sacrifice 
she may do more. Why may not five or ten others, with lighter purses, 
combine for the same purpose ? And why may not many fields be thus 
cared for by similar combinations among home mission circles? A 
word to the wise. 

The Ladies' Home Missionary Society of the First Church, in Wash- 
ington, D. C, stands first upon the list in the matter of the "Salary 
Fund," they having assumed (last April) the entire appropriation of a 
Home Missionary in Utah. 



An Illinois brother says : " I want the American Home Missionary 
Society to close this year without debt. In the words of the humorist 
I believe you should 'keep out of debt even if you have to borrow the 
money to do it!' Please find my check inclosed." 

A missionary in Dakota found a family in which the mother and chil- 
dren had gone without butter nearly all summer, that it might be sold 
and thus money obtained to buy the husband and father a Bible to use 
in the Sunday-school of which he is the superintendent. 

Supt. Doe says of that litt'e company in Indian Territory mentioned 
in the April Home Missionary. "It is really wonderful what that 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



243 



little band is doing in their poverty. If our larger churches should be- 
come filled with the same spirit, you would used several assistants to 
handle the money." 

The wheat fields of summer did not approach the reapers, asking to 
be gathered, but the reapers went out and cut the harvest where it 
stood. The world will not come to the church to be saved ; the church 
must go to it. " Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to 
every creature." 

A home missionary pastor in Kansas — whose people, living in +he midst 
of the "burnt district" (burned by hot wiuds), have, by a great effort, 
put up a church building— writes : "Our funds are completely ex- 
hausted, and we are without seats, organ, or bed." 

Another little home missionary church in Kansas is looking hope- 
fully to the east for a " much-needed communion service." 



The Gospel Engine. —I used to work on the railroad, but ten years 
ago I got off my engine and went to preaching as an evaugeist. I love 
this kind of work — " running extras" — for we make better time. The 
gospel engine beats them all for " pulling passengers." Do pray for us 
out here that we may all come into the Grand Central Depot above, 
bringing a long train, every coach crowded with souls won for Christ- 
— A Home Missionary in Dakota. 



Past repair. — The last time I used my buggy, I had the pleasure of 
walking a part of the way home, and finaLy arrived at my own door 
with two wheels and a badly broken spring. The whole thing has been 
patched and repatched until my best friends say it is a useless expense 
to make any further repairs. With a small salary and a field peculiarly 
remote from all conveniences, things do look a little dark; yet I know 
that even here we are not forgotten. — Dakota. 

[Here is a chance to plant good seed in Dakota by furnishing this home mis- 
sionary with a " gospel buggy.'"] 



Notes. — Have just visited Worcester Academy, Indian Territory. 
Find it in a flourishing condition, five teachers, a matron, and 120 
pupils. The school is open to all classes, but is made up chiefly of 

Cherokee Indians. Some of them are very bright. Looked in at 

Eogers Academy, Arkansas. It is said to be more prosperous than ever, 
having 238 pupils. The tuition has to be made very light, as the peo- 
ple in that section are both ignorant and poor. 'CaMed at Kidder In- 
stitute, Missouri. One hundred pupils; no endowment; but good 
work done. Such a school is of great value, and a great help to the de- 
nomination that sustains it. — Traveler. 



the home missionary. October, 

GOOD INVESTMENTS. 

BY EEV. GEO. C. ADAMS. 

Many are looking for opportunities to invest money where it will 
bring the largest returns. Rates per cent have been diminishing until 
where we used to get eight and ten, we have to be contented with four 
or five. It is an interesting fact that returns on money invested in 
God's work are just as large as they ever were. Some who are afraid 
missionary money is being wasted, are refreshed occasionally by facts 
which show the results of its use. Very few investments of home mis- 
sionary money have paid so well as those made in Missouri. . . . 
The A. H. M. S. appropriates $16,500 to Missouri this year. The total 
reported benevolent contributions for the last year were $40,046, or 
two and one-half times that amount. From the way the Society looks 
upon us, it is quite evident that they expect the day is not far distant 
when Missouri will be classed among the self-supporting states. Dur- 
ing the last five years Kansas has* increased in reported benevolence 
over $5,000; Iowa over $10,000; Nebraska over $12,000, and Missouri 
almost $16,000. It will be seen from these statements that, if we have 
only about twenty self-sustaining churches in the state, these are mostly 
very thoroughly salf-su staining. It is hard to find a state or territory 
where the investment of home missionary funds has brought forth such 
good and lasting results as here. For a few years yet we shall have to 
ask for more of such investments. We have a large number of churches 
in just that condition where a helping hand over a hard place means as- 
sured success and permanent strength. We have a band of faithful 
ministers ; we are troubled with dead-beats, just as all new states are, 
and not much more than some of the eastern states. We have shared 
m the mistakes, as to men and methods, of the more northern states ; 
but with them we have learned a better way. Better men, better 
methods, more consecration, more money, more faith. With these 
equipments we hope still to make a great return on all the funds and 
prayers invested — The Advance. 



MISSOURI. 

BY EEV. F. B. DOE, SUPERINTENDENT OF THE SOUTHWEST DISTRICT. 

Missouri was admitted to the Union in 1821, as a slave state, with 
an area of 67,000 square miles. In geographical position, in water- 
courses, in mineral resources, in soil and climate, she is unsurpassed ; 
yet the growth for fifty years wa3 slow. Under better auspices, the 
progress has been more marked the last twenty years. With the new 
civilization come intelligence and thrift. 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 245 

Eastern Christians gave early attention to the religions welfare of 
the people. In 1812, the Massachusetts and Connecticut Missionary 
Societies sent Rev. John L. Sehermerhorn and Rev. Samuel J. Mills to 
explore the territory. They labored a year, and sent encouraging re- 
poits East, of the future promise of this new region. In 1814, Mr. 
Mills was again sent out for twelve months, accompanied by Daniel 
Smith, a recent graduate of Andover Seminary. The}' reported: "The 
Missouri Territory is fast rising into importance. In St. Louis and its 
neighborhood, the call is extremely urge nt for a clergyman." St. Louis 
then — 1814 — had two thousand souls, one-third of whom were Ameri- 
cans. There were other settlements in the lead mines and along the 
water-courses eager for Christian privileges. The reports of these 
brethren greatly interested New England Congregationalists, and 
awakened a missionary spirit. 

Accordingly, Connecticut missionaries continued to traverse the 
wilds of Missouri under great disadvantages, and sometimes at the 
hazard of life. They started Sunday schools, distributed Bibles and 
tracts, organized churches, visited the sick, buried the dead, and did all 
in their power to benefit the people of that new country. The first 
man to reside in Missouri as permanent missionary, was Rev. Salmon 
Giddings. He was ordained in Connecticut, December 20th, 1815, an 
evangelist, as the record reads, " with a view of going as a missionary 
to St. Louis and vicinity, in the Missouri Territory, west of the River 
Mississippi.'' Mr. Giddings proved a successful missionary till 1820, 
when he was settled as pastor of the First Presbyterian church in St. 
Louis, which he had previously formed. Rev. Timothy Flint also 
traveled along the Missouri River for a hundred miles as an itinerant 
missionary. He wrote to the Panoplist: "No missionary station in the 
United States can surpass this in interest. At no very distant day, it 
will, in human view, be central to the civilized population of North 
America." Rev. John Matthews and Rev. Edward Hollister were also 
commissioned by the Connecticut Society to labor in Missouri. Such 
was the interest shown by New England Congregationalists in doing 
pioneer missionary work, laying foundations on which others built. 

In 182'3, the American Home Missionary Society was formed, and in 
due time assumed the responsibility of this work. In 1850, the Society 
had thirty-three missionaiies in the state, supported largely by New 
England contributions. Money was solicited and freely given by 
eastern Congregationalists to aid in building the first Presbyterian 
house of wot ship in St. Louis. 

Not till 1841 was there a Congregational church formed in Missouii. 
Tbis was in the valley of Arcadia, in the iron region. In 1838, Col. 
Cyrus Russell, with wife and nine children, from Somers, Conn , settled 
there. The following year came Augustus Pease and family, from the 



246 the home missionary. October, 

same place. In 1810, Nathan Trumbull and family, from Monson, 
Mass., joined them. The ensuing year a church was formed, called 
" The Congregational Church of Arcadia'' — the first of our order ever 
known in Missouri. It was a good little flock, but with unfriendly sur- 
roundings. For nine years out of the twelve of their existence, they 
depended on itinerant ministers for their preaching, but held regular 
services. The isolation of the church, and being in a slave' state, made 
it quite impossible to secure a Congregational pastor from the East, 
so a Presbyterian minister was secured a part of the time, and then 
permanently; and the he:oic little church died an involuntary death, 
and was buried in a neighboring Presbytery, where it remaineth to this 
present. 

On the 14th of March, 1352, "The First Trinitarian Congregational 
Church of St. Louis" was constituted, with seventy-seven members, 
self-supporting from the first, and the first permanent church in the 
state, of our order. It was a spontaneous movement of laymen. In 
due time, Rev. Truman M. Post accepted the pastorate. An interest- 
ing revival followed, which added over thirty to the membership. This 
church had marked vicissitudes, various places of worship, hostile sur- 
roundings for some years, but kept patiently and steadily at its mission, 
and is now reaping the rewards. Not till seven years later was another 
church formed. This was the one beacon-light on the outposts of Pil- 
grim civilization. Not till 1865 did our New England institutions find 
much favor in this old slave state. In 1879, we counted seventy-one 
churches, with 3,371 members, and $12,000 benevolent contributions. 
In 1886, we reported seventy-nine churches, 6,406 members, and $40,- 
000 benevolent contributions Not a few of the churches gathered 
during the first decade after the war, with great expectations, have 
died. Still, the progress on the whole is substantial and gratifying. 
"We now have twelve churches in St. Louis, with 2,500 members, and 
ten houses of worship. We also have five churches in Springfield, and 
four in Kansas City. So we may claim to have fairly won our way into 
Missouri at last, though at the ccst of a long and severe struggle. In 
1865, a General Association was formed, and eaily and vigorous efforts 
were made to provide facilities for Christian education in the state 
under the general auspices of these churches. As one result. Drury 
College stands out to view, luminous, the one commanding object of 
interest, with a growing constituency and an ever-widening field of in- 
fluence. Kidder Institute, in another part of the state, is in the same 
line, and has a woik peculiarly its own in academic instruction. What 
has already been done is the best argument and incentive for greater 
things in the future. Missouri is now a free and prosperous state. 
We have an evident mission, as a denomination, in helping to make it 
as the "Garden of the Lord." 



1887. TUB ITJME MIS U0NABY. 247 

•AT EVENING TIME." 

BY REV. ZACHARY EDDY, D.D. 

"Strike when thou trill the hoar of rest, 
Bal Id my last days be my best." 

My term of service as a missionary of the American Home Mission- 
ary Society is end id. I came to Atlanta, October 29th, 1884. During 
tbi-i period of two an I a half years — say about two years of personal 
service — what hi; been accomplished? Nothing to boast of, but some- 
thing which calls for thanksgiving. Soon after I commenced my 
labors, the litt.e church then called the Piedmont Church, was reor- 
ganized under the name of the Church of the Kedeemer. While we 
kept in view the church order established by the apostles, we copied 
very closely, in all details, after the Pilgrim Church, of St. Louis, which 
we regarded as a model church, especially for the West and South. 
We were the more inclined to do this, because we regarded that church 
as our mother church. But for the libera' ity of the lamented Dr. 
Goodell and the leading members of his flock, the "Church of the Re- 
deemer" would never have come into existence. Beginning with about 
forty resident members, the majority of them young and poor in this 
world's goods, we purchased an eligible central lot, and, in due time, 
erected the most beautiful chapel in the South. Liberally helped by 
northern friends, through the American Congregational Union, we 
dedicated the chapel, virtually free of debt, on Easter Sunday, 1886. 
Oar church property, entirely unincumbered, is worth at least $20,000 
secured against alienation by the usual mortgage to the A. C. U. 

Since I began my work in Atlanta, we have received ninty-five into 
the communion of the church; forty-two on confession of faith. 
Among those who have joined by letter, are seventeen Presbyterians, 
two Reformed (Dutch), thirteen Methodists, one Lutheran, one Chris- 
tian ; the rest, Congregationalists. We have lost four by death, and 
twenty by removal. Tnus our losses have been heavy; but now we 
seem to have entered on a period of solid, permanent growth, many of 
our people having homes of their own, and the financial strength of 
the congregation being considerably increased. The morning congre- 
gations now fill the chapel ; and we foresee the day when it will ba 
necessary to build a commodious church edifice, for which the beautiful 
lot adjoining the chapel is waiting. The Sanday-school is in a healthy 
condition, and the prayer-meetings are well attended. 

We have revealed to the southern people the real nature of the Con- 
gregational church order. They no longer confound us with Uni- 
tarians, Universalists, and other so-called "liberal" sects; but begin to 
understand that, while we are thoroughly evangelical, we are catholic 
in spirit and policy. Already a wide-spread interest touching our 



248 the home missionary. October, 

church order is spreading through the state. Our northern friends 
must not be surprised if, during the next year, a considerable number 
of Congregational churches, composed mainly of southern Christians, 
should seek for the fellowship of our denomination. We are now re- 
garded by all the evangelical churches of Atlanta as thoroughly identi- 
fied with them in the work of city evangelization. We are no longer 
looked upon as " strangers and foreigners," but as " fellow-citizens. 1 ' I 
must say, for myself, that during the half-century of my ministry, I 
have never received more kindly treatment than from the ministers of 
Atlanta. In my afflictions they have proved themselves true and gener- 
ous friends. 

The time is come when I must leave this lovely city and my own 
lovely "Church of the Redeemer." My impaired health demands a sea- 
son of absolute rest. My heart has been too deeply wounded, and is 
too slow in healing, to bear any longer the burden of pastoral responsi- 
bility. After another Sabbath — a Communion Sabbath — I purpose 
to return to Detroit, and seek repose in the society of my chil- 
dren and children's children. Something I may be able to do for the 
Kingdom hereafter, but my pastoral life is ended. Would to God I 
had been more efficient in my long service ! God forgive my short- 
comings ! Thanks to His name that I have been permitted, for more 
than half a century, to declare, though in weakness, the unsearchable 
riches of Christ ! 



AN ADDRESS.* 

BY REV. GEO. M. SANB0RNE, OF ARKANSAS. 



Fellow- workers for the Master. — I represent before you this after- 
noon, the least known and perhaps the most ridiculed state in the Union. 
Many think our people in Arkansas are semi barbarians, their favorite 
implements the revolver and bowie-knife; that all arts are "lost arts" 
down there because never found, and the only appreciated music is The 
Arkansas Traveler; that the state is, in short, a Cave of Adullam with- 
out a David. Such ideas are wildly erroneous; nowhere can there be 
found a more honest, progressive people, a finer climate, more fertile 
soil, or a greater variety of products. The natural resources of Arkan- 
sas are not excelled by any sister state. With 26,000 square miles of 
timber lands above ground, a soil capable of producing an unsurpassed 
variety of crops, and a multitude of rapidly developing mines of various 
kinds underground, Arkansas is to stand in the forefront among the 
wealthy states. Let me mention some of the notable facts about Arkan- 
sas usually unknown. First, it is the only state the pronunciation of 

* Given at tlie Annual Meeting at Saratoga, June, 1887. 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 24$ 

whose name has been legally fixed by special act of its legislature. Again 
we have two Saratogas ; Eureka Springs, up among the hills where refuge 
is found from the heat of the Sunny South, aud where "the healing 
streams do flow"; and Hot Springs, the far-famed Southwestern Sani- 
tarium — the American Bethesda. 

Arkansas has more miles of navigable rivers than any other state, 
and to show you that the "schoolmaster is abroad" with us, let me tell 
you that we spend a larger proportion of our state revenue for the sup- 
port of ourpub'ic schools than does Massachusetts or any other state in 
the Union. Arkansas is a strong temperance state. Of her seventy- 
eight counties, over half are "dry"; by a triple method, — local option, 
power of county judge to refuse license, and the famous "Three mile Law,"" 
— allowing women a practical ballot for or against the rum traffic, — we are 
rapidly driving King Alcohol on a double quick retreat beyond our bor- 
ders. Last year fewer United States liquor licenses were issued for 
Arkansas — population considered — than for Maine, Iowa, or Kansas. 

Across our state the tide of immigration is rolling. The new-comers 
are nearly all Americans. Few from the uneasy multitude crowding Cas- 
tle Garden come to us. They are mostly from the North and East. I 
shake hands daily in Little Rock with some of your old neighbors. 
Calais, Maine, and Sitka, Alaska, are represented in my congregation y 
men frozen out of Kansas, Illinois and New England come to us to get 
warm and make money. They invest capital, engage in business, and, when 
acclimated, make first-rate Arkansians. How are these northerners re- 
ceived, do you ask ? Not as warmly as twenty-five years ago, but the 
greeting is a great deal more fraternal. There is a new South, which, 
rising baptized by the blood of a hundred battle fields, with the smoke 
of cannonades still clinging to her garments, extends a hand to her former 
foe in clasp of perpetual peace and good- will. Slavery is dead, and south- 
ern men heartily say amen to the fact of emancipation ; forty years ago, 
in my state a negro was in the eyes of the law real estate; men who 
once upheld that law are glad it is no more, and that the black man is 
free. The South stands to-day at the parting of two ways ; she is break- 
ing away from old forms of thought allied with slavery ; defeated in war 
she may conquer in peace. She is not content with the past, and know- 
ing her golden age is before, she faces it. The southern Rip Van Winkle 
has awakened from a long nap, younger and stronger. 

The proverbial southern sluggishness, if ever true, is a thing of the 
past. There is a stir of industrial activity all over the South, and in the 
work of developing its resources northern capital and enterprise is 
largely employed, always welcomed by representative southern people. 

There is now a wonderful religious opportunity for us as a denomina- 
tion. The old churches do not fully meet the needs of this changing 
community ; sectional feeling is stronger in them than in business or pro- 



250 THE HOME MISSIONARY October, 

fessional circles, and more than any other one thing they aid in per- 
petuating sectional distrust. Baptists, Methodists and Presbyterians 
keep sectional feeling alive by their very names and national connections. 
There are two so called Northern Methodist churches and two Southern 
Methodist churches in Little Rock, and alliance with either is an avowal 
of sectionalism. The New South has little respect for Mason and Dixon's 
line, and does not believe that sectionalism should be known in religious 
organizations. Here is our opportunity. The Congregational church 
is not sectional, it is progressive ; knowing no North nor South, it believes 
in progress and growth; between it and the New South there is a strong 
affinity. Teaching applied Christianity ; able to draw within its fold 
those of every name and faith and make them feel at home, our denomi- 
nation is in hearty accord with the wide-awake spirit prevailing in the 
southern States. Our greatest hindrance is the lack of knowledge about 
our history, polity and doctrines. Talking one day with a Christian 
business man in Texas, he said: 'T don't exactly know what the Congre- 
gational church is. Do you believe anything as the Mormons do?" A 
lady of Little Rock, calling on my wife lately, asked me some questions 
about the history of Congregationalism. In answering, I mentioned the 
Pilgrim Fathers. Her face brightened, and she said, '-Oh, you are a branch 
of the Methodist church then, the Pilgrims were all Methodists, I be- 
lieve." A friend recently visiting Hot Springs, asked a policeman one 
day where the Congregational church was to be found. "What do you 
mean?" was the response. "All the churches have congregations here." 
When understood, our church is liked in the South. " Yours is the de- 
nomination for the South, for it has States Rights in religion," was the in- 
dorsement of it once given to me by a keen-witted southern man. Our 
pastor at Eureka Springs, Ark., was the chaplain of the first regiment of 
Confederate Volunteers organized iu New Orleans, aud filled important 
charges in the Southern Methodist church. He is one of the most 
loyal Congregatioualists I ever knew, for he believes it is the denomina- 
tion best fitted by its genius and history for his loved Southland. Months 
ago, a minister from Mississippi with whom I had correspondence for 
some time came to me and desired admission to my church aud to the 
Congregational ministry. A. native of the South he had known nothing 
of our denomination until he found an account of it in a Cyclopedia. He 
said that for thirteen years he had chafed in his ecclesiastical harness 
and often desired to organize an independent church on what he believed 
was a Biblical basis. To his surprise when he read of the Congrega- 
tional cuurch he found it was the ideal church for which he had yearned. 
He is now under this Society's commission, doing good work in 
Missouri. 

We have now in Arkansas eight churches and two thriving acade- 
mies. One of the academies is under the charge of Prof. J. W. Scroggs, 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY 251 

at Rogers, the other is located at Siloam Springs and is presided over by 
Prof, and Mrs. M. H. Copeland. The outlook for Rogers Academy is 
especially encouraging, 284 pupils being enrolled at its Inst term. The 
Arkansas Association of Congregational Churches and Ministers, which 
has just been organized, will greatly help aud solidify our work. You have 
noticed that a mother prefers to talk ( f her own children ; let me tell 
you about my wo)k at Little R )ck. The city is bpautilully aud centrally 
located; its population has swelled from 1I3.00>> in ]88J to 30,000. 
Twenty years ago Milton Badger, one of the secretaiies of this Society 
wrote to a man who is now my senior deacon, a letter which I have in my 
pocket, promising to send a minister to organize a Congregational 
church in Little Rock. No such church was founded, although a num- 
ber of futi'e attempts were made, until three years ago, wheu the field 
was occupied by a missionary of this Society. At that time Superinten- 
dent Doe said in his annual report to 1 his meeting, speaking of L tele 
Rock : "There is no more difficult or important field prospectively in my 
district. I shall hold on there if possible." We have now passed the 
"if possible" stage of our work. Beginning May Lt, 1881, with sixteen 
member?, not a dollar in the treasury, no church home, no wealthy mem- 
bers, we have now over one hundred members, property valued at $10,- 
000, and not one dollar of indebtedness. We are carrying on practically 
four Sunday-schools, and have assumed self-support, paying the pastor a 
salary of $1,800. Mr. Doe says to you in his report this year that Lit- 
tle Rock furnishes the " most signal example of rapid progress " in* his 
field. There is no reason why the work at Little Rock should not be du- 
plicated in other leading towns in Arkansas. Half a dozen cities rapidly 
growing, should be entered at once. The door of emergency and oppor- 
tunity is open now. The iron is hot, let us strike. 

A few words in closing about our needs in carrying on our work. We 
need the continued blessing and presence of our divine Master. We need 
money. The appropriations of this Society and other Congregational 
societies have been very small for Aikinsas. We do not blame you for 
it. The needs aud opportunities of the tield have not been known. Not 
until to-day has Arkansas ever had a representative to plead for her at 
one of your inspiring anniveisary meetings. We need men. Not men 
who are chronic failures in ministerial work, but men of spiritual energy 
and consecrated common sense; men with the spirit of Xnvier or of the 
Iowa Band ; men who have light for the intellect, and dew for the heart. 
Last, not least, we need your hearty confidence and sympathy. Some of 
you have doubted our mission at the South; it has been said to me: 
"We are not wanted at the South, in Arkansas. Why force an entrance 
at such expense ?" Let me answer. When did Congregationalism ever 
wait to be invited? When did it wait to near man's voice saying, "Come 
ye," when God's voice said. "Goje 1 ?" The Macedonian cry was an un- 



252 the home missionary. October, 

voiced appeal. If not wanted, ye are needed ; that fact should be invita- 
tion enough for Christians. The Congregational church was planted in 
the South before it was in New England. Jamestown was settled before 
Plymouth. 

Some of you risked life to give the negro his freedom. Ai*e we less 
loyal who seek to aid on the thought and spiritual emancipation of the 
New South ? Triumphs for Christ in the South deserve as sincere 
doxologies of tba' ksgiving as do victories for Immanuel in the far West. 
In your gifts and prayers, fathers and brf thren, I beg you to remember 
that this Society, in whose interests we meet to-day, should know no 
North nor South, no East nor West in its work, for it is in aim as in name 
the Amfeican Home Missionary Society. Help us to pass through the 
gateway of present opportunity which God has flung open for us, and 
soon Aikansas will be annexed to Pilgrimdom, fully under the dominion 
of the Lord Christ's regnant will. 



AN OPPORTUNITY. 

BY REV. GEO. E. ALBRECHT. 



[The following appeal froni our late Superintendent Albrecht is heartily in- 
dorsed by Rev. C. O. Brown, pastor First Church, Dubuque, la. ; Rev. T. O. 
Douglass, Sec'y Iowa H. M. Soc'y; Rev. A. L. Frisbie, pastor Plymouth Church, 
Des Moines, la., and Rev. J. C. Holbrook, first pastor of the American Congre- 
gational Church in Dubuque, la. We refer our readers to an article in the June 
Home Missionary, entitled, " Faithful over a Few Things," giving a graphic ac- 
count of the struggles of this little church and the almost unequaled Christian 
heroism of its faithful pastor, from which we reprint one paragraph. " Through 
all these years (of painful toil) our brother has declined to accept home mission- 
ary aid, always saying that there were more needy ones than he to whom this 
aid couid go ; yet his church has never been able to give him more than $300 
salary, while he, personally, has earned the rest of his daily bread in other ways # 
Now he looks back over nearly twenty years of such work, and sees,- not the angel 
form of his darling child; not the hours of menial service in the sick room; not 
the days of toil in carpentering and painting and blasting and hewing rocks; not 
the dark clouds that encompassed him during all these years ; but A church re- 
spected by every one in the city; two hundred and fifty children and young peo- 
ple in Sunday-school, seventy-five to one hundred in the preaching services, the 
blessing of God resting upon his work so that there is no more room in the pres- 
ent building to contain it, and he says: 'If only we had the money we have 
saved the Home Missionary Society in ttie last eleven years to use for our 
church building' ! Surely, Christian heroism is found not merely on the foreign 
field; many a hero fights a harder battle in our home work, in the very heart of 
our civilized land, than our beloved brethren across the waters. Whether this 
self-sacrificing sowing and toiling through these nineteen years shall spring up 
into a blessed fruitage of a larger and more influential work than ever before is 
for our churches to say, in giving or in withholding from our missionary socie- 
ties the means for aiding such work.'*] 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 253 

'•. Is we therefore have opportunity let us do good unto all men, es- 
pecially unto them who are of the household of faith.'" This is a scrip- 
tural command, an undisputed passage, believed by all wbo believe in 
tbe Bible, therefore a first-class basis for an appeal to Congregational- 
ists of all schools and shades of interpretation. They all are desirous of 
obeying the Scriptures, therefore desirous to "do good" as they "have 
opportunity." Now here is an "an opportunity," and a rare one. 

The German Congregational Church of Dubuque, la., has been 
brought providentially to the time where it must "lengthen its cords," 
where it must erect a new house of worship. They are " of the house- 
hold of faith," they are needing our help, therefore they ought to be 
helped. 

Dubuque is an influential city in Iowa and in the West. Always a 
city of importance, new railroads have made it a center for commerce 
and trade. Its rapid growth is assured. It has now, unfortunately for 
our project, a real estate "boom." About one-third of the population, 
numbering in all nearly 30,000, is German. Our German church, or- 
ganized in 1867, has always held an important and respected position 
among the German, as well as among the native American citizens. 
Through more than nineteen years it has stood for truth, purity and 
temperance, although often ridiculed and persecuted. Heroically they 
have done their work, declining aid from the Home Missionary Society 
in order that other needy churches farther west might be aided. With 
such a spirit, it is no wonder that the work has grown. Twenty-two ad- 
ditions by profession during the last year to a membership of forty- 
three, an increase of nearly fifty per cent, speaks wtll for the spiritual 
work of the church. The Sunday-school, numbering 260, and a full 
house almost every Sabbath morning, while it is almost as difficult to 
reach the door of the church as it is to reach many a church steeple, 
proves plaiuly that it has a strong hold in the community. That they 
must have a new building, larger, more commodious, better situated in 
order to do the woik which God is laying upon them, admits of no 
doubt. Not only the work of the future cannot be done in their pres- 
ent quarters, but much of the self sacrifice of the past will be lost, if 
for some reason the plan of erecting a new and suitable building should 
fail. The sum of $7,000 will scarcely suffice to cover the cost of the lot 
and the building. The church- members themselves are mostly poor, but 
they have already pledged such sums as will require genuine sacrifice 
for them to pay. The English-speaking church, seeing the need and the 
worth of this cause, are helping liberally; but they have been well taxed 
lately b} T improvements of their own house of worship. The German 
citizens will be called on for aid, and many of them will respond gladly ; 
but too much cannot be expected from people who have no particular 
interest in the cause of Christ and in a church opposing some of their 



254 tee noME missionary. October, 

cbief practices. So, while the church and the citizens are expected to 
do tbeir full share, we feel that the work cannot succeed without liberal 
help from the friends of our cause in Iowa and all through the land. 
Therefore, we appeal to all Congregsitioualists to use this "opportunity," 
set before us in the providence of God, to u do good" unto one of our 
"household of faith," whose past record shows that this help will be 
most worthily bestowed, and that it will be turned to excellent account 
in the Master's cause. This church, in this important city, with such 
elements of population as it has, and with its noble past record, must 
not be forsaken now in the hour of its need and opportunity. Their 
cause is our cause; their opportunity our opportunity. Let all gifts, 
large or small, be sent to Dr. L H. Cobb, Secretary of the A. C. U.,. 
Bible House, New York, stating that tbey are for the German Church, in 
Dubuque, la., and thus the church will'be enabled to do the work for 
which God has placed it in that city. 



FRUIT. III. 

Dwellers on the Hills. — You will be glad to hear we are ju3t enjoy- 
ing a revival of spiritual interest on this field. Some are under convic- 
tion, aud have asked prayers in our meetings, while the members of the 
church are much moved, and have come together in the houses for 
prayer meetings. Last night at one of these meetings on one of the 
hills seven miles out from home, sixteen were present ; of these, two un- 
saved asked an interest in prayer that God would give them a saving 
knowledge of the truth. Others were much impressed. The meeting 
was one of great spiritual power. My own heart was much i*efreshed, 
for this interest has shown itself quite suddenly. On a neighboring hill 
there are also signs of an awakening. Remember these dwellers on the 
hills. Many of them came here thiity years ago, and until Dr. Atkinson 
came among them casually about six years ago, were entirely desti- 
tute of religious instruction, and among these older settlers there re- 
main many who are quite indifferent. But we have gathered a little 
fruit, and now there are sigus of more. We expect an addition of two 
at the Home Church and four at the Hill Church at our next communion. 
I beg an interest in your prayers that the blessing already manifested 
may grow into a great revival. — Rev. John M. JPamment, Washougal y 
Wash. l\r. 

Harder Blows — I do not take much stock in the old adage that 
misery loves compauy, yet it did my heart good to read the " Notes 
from the Front," iu the April Home Missionary, and I want to tell you 
so. That brother in Colorado expressed my feelings so completely that 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY 255 

I felt drawn towards him, and moved to ask God's blessing on kim and 
his work. The wakeful nights, the heart-aches, the tears, the untold 
anxiety, are not all confined to one in this great conflict ; if it were, the 
heart would break. 

We are planning to build a parsonage and two churches on my fipld 
this season, and by the help of God we expect to be successful. The 
first settler came into this region eight years ago. I am the only gos- 
pel worker in this vicinity. I came one year ago. Some of the people 
were averse to having any minister come here ; others looked upon the 
thing as an experiment of which I would soon sicken. Not one dreamed 
that we would ever find ourselves planning for a house of worship! 
But the Master's cause is gaining ground here, and as I write these 
words I cannot keep back the tears of joy, while my heart is filled with 
praise to God. 

I am on the road a great deal of the time, and have more calls than I 
can possibly attend to. I feel that this work out here in Northern 
Michigan belongs to God, and that he will take care of it ; and so in 
reference to the entire country; if we do our duty, he will do his part. 
More and stronger faith, harder blows for Christ and his cause and the 
right, are what we want. Pray for us — everybody. — A Missionary in 
Northern Michigan. 

By the Wayside. — Last Monday morning, while passing along on the 
street near my church, a man asked me to step into his store, and hear 
some good news. He told me that while at meeting the evening before 
he had surrendered himself to God, and would with his help from this 
time on live a Christian life. One year ago this very man kept a saloon, 
which was a terrible evil and temptation in the pathway of the young 
men in this part of our city. Oh, how I rejoiced with him, and for him ! 
My heart was filled with praise. 

As I went again upon the street, I met a young man who has led a 
sad life of sin, and who "never had any use for preachers," but would 
always speak all manner of evil against them falsely. To my surprise, 
he greeted me kindly. I told him the good news I had just learned of 
his neighbor, and plead with him to give his heart to the Lord Jesus 
Christ. He seemed touched, and asked me would I come into his store 
a few moments. When alone, he opened his heart and told me all his 
trouble. He had once been a Christian, but had got out of the narrow 
way, and had been traveling long, weary years in the broad way, without 
once entering a church door. He has promised to attend service next 
Sabbath, and bring his family. 

A few of my young men are laboring in a protracted meeting at the 
Exposition Mills with fair success. One evening they had four conver- 
sions. These young men work hard all day in the factories and shops, 
and then go out and work for Jesus, walking five miles to the meeting. 



"'^ , THE HOME MISSIONARY. October, 

I met them last night after eleven o'clock just coming home, wearied 
enough in body, but full of joy in the Master's service. I had been to 
■see the engineer of one of our railroads, who came for me to go and see 
his fireman, who was lying sick, with no hope in Christ. I found the 
young man in deep trouble. Sitting down by his bedside, I led him to 
look away from his trouble and sickness, while I pointed him to the 
Lord Jesus Christ. He accepted the conditions of salvation, and I left 
him sweetly trusting. 

This morning I preached the funeral sermon of a sweet little babe. 
Only three weeks ago the father of this child told me he was " too mean 
to be a church member." He seems broken-hearted now, and this may 
be the means through which our Heavenly Father will lead him back to 
himself.— Rev. W. Shaw, Atlanta, Ga. 



THE "BALD KNOBBERS. 



We have been having most troublesome times in our county of late. 
The members of the secret organization known as " Bald Knobbers'" 
have been busy trying to enforce the law ! With this end in view they 
have met from time to time in the woods after dark to decide upon 
future action. They have been known to go to homes at the dead of 
night, and take from their beds those who by act or testimony 
had opposed them in any way. This had been done so often that the 
settlers living south of us a few miles were in constant dread of these 
devils in human shape. The organization was secret and bound to- 
gether under a fearful obligation or oath. Many who were members 
had joined without thought as to its ultimate aim. Others were mem- 
bers for self protection. Their work culminated a short time ago in a 
terrible murder. A number of the band met one daik night and after a 
full discussion of the matter, decided they would visit a family who had 
lately moved into our county from the north, whose outspoken condem- 
nation of their course aroused their spite. About eighteen of the band 
made the raid. Surrounding the house in which the family resided, they 
entered from both sides, shooting down two of the young men, also 
striking the old gray-headed father with an ax and leaving him for dead. 
This last act roused the people to action. Twenty four of those thought 
to have been engaged in the murder were promptly arrested. These 
are held for the action of a special Grand Jury. 

The jury are now in session. I was told this afternoon that they 
had already found 300 indictments, eighteen of these for murder in the 
first degree. This will now, we hope, put a stop to this dreadful work 
and counteract to some extent the influence they have had for evil. 

Many young men who were in the organization, and were present on 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY 257 

the night of the murder, were led ignorantly to the crime for which they 

are now held. Among those under arrest is a preacher of 

Church; several of them are church-members. The whole matter has 
caused quite a sensation. This trouble proves to us that this people 
need the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ preached to them. It is the 
only true remedy for ignorance and sin here in the country, as also in 
Chicago and other large cities of our land. May fellow-Christians of 
our churches feel their obligations to those who are at work on such 
fields. It is our glorious privilege to preach Christ to such, and if we 
live up to our calling in Christ, we must preach or send by our means a 
substitute. How can this better be done than by giving the needed 
means to the American Home Missionary Society, which will commission 
willing and earnest workers for such fields. — ./. D. Wherland, Ozark, 
Mo. 



EXPERIENCE INTERPRETING SCRIPTURE. 

" The cloak that 1 left at Troas with Carpus, when thou contest, 
bring icith thee." — 2 Timothy, 4; 13. 

More than thirty years ago, when in New York on my way to spend 
the winter attending lectures in Philadelphia, I staid with a cousin who 
was fitting for college to be a minister. Oar talk was on Scripture, and 
I asked him to explain the meaning of the above passage. He could not 
and I remarked to him on the uselessness of this text in the Bible, not 
being quite able to reconcile it with the passage, " All Scripture . . . 
is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in 
righteousness." After my visit I went to Philadelphia, the weather be- 
ing delightfully warm. A day or two later there was a sudden change 
to cold, with high winds. Then I found out the meaning of the pas- 
sage, for my cloak was left at New York. Shivering with chills, I 
wrote for the cloak. Thus exactly repeating St. Paul's expression, and 
confessing that I had learned a lesson well. Now, after three decades, 
it is as fresh as ever, viz.: not to neglect the health of the body. 

" By my God have I leapedover a wall." — Psalms 18; 29. 

This is a text that before 1873 seemed to me rather out of place in 
the Word of God. I do not think so now, as I cannot leap over a wall. 
While running down stairs in '73, I caught my left boot-heel on the edge 
of a stone step, in the act of extending the limb, while my body was 
suspended in the air duriug the short interval of flight from one step to 
another. Instantly the patella was torn in twain across the middle. 
From that time to this, and so long as Hive, I can never leap over a bar, 
much less a wall. This sudden and total disability has shed a wonder- 
ful light forme on the passage quoted above. E/ery time I walk about 
I have to keep the injured limb in mind, just as a mother does her babe 



258 THE HOME MISSIONARY. October, 

in her arms. I admire more and more the wonderful wisdom of God, 
who framed David's body so he could leap over a wall. How blessings 
brighten as they flee ! Having lost toe proper antagonism of my mus- 
cles, so that I cannot ]eap, or run fast enough to leap, having a limb 
which is not under the voluntary system of nerves, which is liable at any 
time to give out and break the other patella, as the history of such cases 
shows, having, when tired, an unnatural coldness of the limb, though 
the thermometer may be at 100 degrees, being liable to severe cramps 
from walking distances which before would not have troubled me at all 
(since this loss of power the limb does its work at the expenditure of un- 
usual nerve force), — having now such constant reminders of my disabil- 
ity, I look with great interest when I see one climb a roof, jump a ditch, 
or leap a wall. I thank God for the lesson I have learned of his good- 
ness in the formation of our bodies, and hope I shall never cavil at any 
passage of his Word, lest worse evils come upon me. — E. C. 



• COUNTER-ATTRACTIONS. 



From South Dakota. — Many thanks for the kind interest taken in our 
effort here to stem the tide of intemperance.- The miners are delighted 
at the prospect of a reading-room and library. One man hearing of our 
project, immediately started an opposition room, offering as bait, pro- 
gressive euchre, with other games, and dancing. It has fallen to the 
ground, the men refusing to have anything to do with it, but patiently 
awaiting the means and books for our own room. We have succeeded in 
renting a building until lately devoted to the saloon business, but closed 
on account of the temperance labors of our Finnish brethren. We are 
glad to get this place, as it seems like meeting the enemy on his own 
ground. We have been very busy fitting it up, cleaning — oh, how it 
needed it! — painting, papering, etc. There is a point it would be well for 
any brother to dwell upon, if contemplating missionary work on the 
frontier. He must be ready to put his hand to anything out here; paint- 
ing, paper-hanging, carpenteiing, etc. Well, considering the work has 
been done by amateurs, we are very comfortably fixed. It has been 
amusing at times while engaged in fixing the place up, to see the door 
open and a man slink in, for our saloon at one time was largely patron- 
ized by the sly class, thinking the saloon still lived, only to shuffle out 
on finding the minister and a band of Good Templars present. The 
young men who will patronize this reading- room are miners, it is true; but 
in their ranks it would not be a difficult matter to find a score of gradu- 
ates from some of our best colleges. They are men who want to live 
abreast of the times. It may be said, "Such men, if you have them, 
should provide their own intellectual food," to which we answer, " Give 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 25$> 

them time." These men are in dangpr. Like the mariner of old they 
are being destroyed by the spell of the sirens. We want to strike a 
richer note that shall break the spell and prove a counter-attraction. 
We want to give them a place to which they can come and feel at home. 
When they get to value it they will keep it going. — Rev. G. Betsey 7 Lead 
City, Dak, 

The Sunday-school of the Central Church, Brooklyn, N. Y., have sent 
a generous contribution of valuable books to each of the home missionary 
reading-rooms, which in every case has called forth most grateful ac- 
knowledgment. From Portland, Oregon, we learn that these books 
were most gratefully received, and that the people arc making the 
best use of them. They have organized an association, adopted a con- 
stitution, and elected a Board of Directors, so that the library will be^ 
under the best of management. It is in an excellent location in . grow-. 
ing community, with a great many young people. Any books and niag^ 
azines sent to Bev. Daniel Staver, East Portland, Oregon, for this. 
library, will be gratefully received. 

From Arkansas. — We were hardly jjrepared for the bountiful gifts 
from our Brooklyn friends. Through the March Home Missionary, 
in its " Letter to the Young People," I was permitted to introduce our 
students to the kind donors in the midst of their lovely Christmas work 
for others. How every eye glistened as the touching story was read! Then, 
an enthusiastic vote of thanks was offered to the Brooklyn Central Church 
Sunday-school for their most valuable contributioivto the library 
of Siloam Springs Academy. I am especially grateful for this beautiful 
lesson of " forgetting number one in caring for number two." If our 
dear wealthy people in the East could see this field as we see it, the 
opening for doing Christ's work, the need of Christian workers and 
schools for training them, I know their hearts would be moved and 
there would be no lack of funds for •' laying foundations." — Mrs. ML 
II. Copeland, Siloam Springs. 

From Colorado. — A few days ago a letter came announcing fifty- nine 
volumes on the way for our circulating library. In the prayer-meet- 
ing that evening there were shining faces after it was announced that 
an east 3rn friend had remembered us in this way. And a vote of thanks 
was promptly proposed and as promptly carried. So you will, please,. 
in the name of our church thank the giver of those precious books- 
At present there seems to be considerable interest here in .religious. 
matters. May it continue to increase ! The Home Missionary Society 
has many friends in this little western town. We expect to dedicate 
our new church in a few weeks. In my next report I hope to be able/ to 
say, " We dedicated a house in Julesburg, for the glory of God and the 
good of humanity." I pray that the Society and all its fingers may be 
alive to the needs of the hour. — Rev. W. II. Bonnell, Lulesburg. 



260 the home missionary. October, 

From Texas — Through the liberality of friends in Congregational 
and tempei'ance ranks, a number of papers, tracts and small books, in 
good condition have been received at my reading-room. I 
am very grateful to these friends. That a temperance and 
religious reading-room has long been needed here, there is no 
doubt ; but tha people have been too much afraid of the "rum power" 
to move in the matter. The parents have failed to realize its vital im- 
portance to the young. The times have been especially hard with us of 
late, but we have been enabled to sow liberally the seeds of religion and 
temperance, sowing early and late, and beside all waters, praying God 
to give the increase. We have not only established the reading-room, 
but in that same room we hold a Sunday-school and praise service 
every Sabbath. This reading-room is situated on one of the principal 
thoroughfares of the town, and in the midst of business houses, lumber 
yards, and flouring mills, half a mile distant from any church, and draws 
in many from the street corners and highways who rarely enter a church 
or Sunday-school. We should be grateful for further contributions to 
this room of interesting and standard works, by good authors, which will 
attract and elevate these young people. — Rev. C. JB. Martin, Weather- 
ford. 

From North Dakota. — Our reading-room in Dakota has opened a new 
channel into which the stream may run that hitherto has flown only toward 
the saloons. The young man in charge of it this year is a brand plucked 
from the burning, a Boston boy, who was both drinking and gambling when 
we found him. He is now a Christian. He and a companion of his, also 
from New England, have been radically changed, for which change the 
reading-room is I think in great measure responsible. Last year it was 
next door to a saloon. Now it has the very room occupied last year by 
the saloon. We made more of the reading-room last year than of 
the library. This year and hereafter the library will take the pre- 
cedence. 



A Warning. — I have been in Dakota six years, where I have been try- 
ing to combine farming and preaching. I want to warn ail who are 
called to preach the gospel to turn and flee away from any inducements 
held out to them to become entangled -with the affairs of this life. I 
had some money ahead six years ago, and yielded to the temptation to 
put it into government lands and farming. It has thrown me into 
financial embarrassment that has been my daily torment and that has 
crippled me in mind and body. I have learned a lesson, and from this 
time on I will know nothing among my people save "Jesus Christ and 
him crucified. 1 ' — A Pastor. 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 261 

THE FIRST CHURCH IN THE STATE. 

A red-letter day was the twenty- first day of November, 1886, and 
long will it be remembered by us. On that day we dedicated one of the 
neatest church buildings in the state of Louisiana. How many states 
can boast that their first church was dedicated without debt and without 
one cent of help from " the Church-Building Society." Now I'm going to 
tell you how it was done here. We did our best to build the church, 
but being small in numbers, and very poor, we found ourselves heavily 
in debt, and the day of dedication close at hand. Col. Shankland, of 
Iowa, comforted us by saying, "If we can only get a good day next Sun- 
day at the dedication, I think we'll come out all right." Late Saturday 
night, having looked over the accounts with the church treasurer, I 
came home with a heavy heart, for the financial cloud hung over us 
black and threatening. Before retiring, I told the Lord my fears and 
anxieties, and was enabled to cast the burden upon him. It rained some 
during the night, but He who rules the winds and the clouds ordered 
that the day of our dedication should be all that we could desire as to 
weather. At half past ten o'clock we found ourselves listening to a 
grand discourse from Prof. Knapp, who emphasized his sermon by say- 
ing, " Put me down for fifty dollars to help pay for this church." Surely 
the war of sect is coming to an end, for Prof. Knapp is a good Metho- 
dist brother. That act worked like a charm, and immediately Rev. Mr. 
Scofield, '"General Missionary'' for Texas and Louisiana,was upon his feet 
urging all to give to the same object, until we were all filled with enthu- 
siasm. Deacon Cary proposed that we raise the balance needed right 
there among ourselves. Then there was a race between the " Iowa col- 
ony" and the natives of Louisiana, to see who could bring in the biggest 
sum. The natives came out ahead. Mr. Herbert, a native, and a Ro- 
manist, living eighteen miles away, who had contributed twice before, 
said, with love beaming in his eves, "Father Jones, put me down for 
twenty dollars more." The interest was now at boiling heat, and Bro- 
ther Scofield asked, " Who will give ten dollars?" Mr. Cahn, a Hebrew 
from New Orleans, said, " Dr. Jones, put me down for ten dollars." 
We could not agree about the divinity of Christ, but in this matter of 
paying the church debt there was neither Jew nor Gentile. When Bro- 
ther Scofield asked, " Who will give five dollars apiece ?" the hands went 
up so fast that he had to cry out, "Hold on, there! Brother Jones is 
getting so excited that he can't write half your names. Come forward." 
And they did come until the last bill was provided for. This is from the 
Lord, and it is marvelous in our eyes. 

As with the little band who came up out of the captivity with Zerub- 
babel, this struggling "Iowa colony" away down in Louisiana had the 
heart to work; and hence, with the blessing of God upon our efforts, the 
first white Congregational church of Louisiana. 



262 the home missionary. October, 

And now we remember with gratitude the Pilgrim Church, St. Louis, 
•who sent us a beautiful communion set and fifty dollars in money; Mrs. 
Otis, of Des Moines, Iowa, who sent us sixty dollars, which she collected 
.nmong her own friends; the New Orleans friends for lamps, locks, and a 
JBible; Hon. J. B. Grinnell, of Iowa, for a fine bell. Our superintendent, 
Hev. Dr. Doe, said, '' May this bell proclaim the gospel here for many 
years! 1 ' For other generous contributions we must thank the Sunday- 
school and church of Pierce City, Mo.; D. E. Sweet and L. S. Cuttings, 
of Minnesota, and Mr. C. T. Granger, of Iowa, and Prof. R. D. Jones. 
"We have been greatly encouraged and strengthened by the aid and sym- 
pathy of our good superintendent, Rev. F. B. Doe. His wise counsel 
has been invaluable to us while organizing our church and struggling to 
build a temple unto the Lord God. It is now done, and we praise God 
irom full hearts. May the Holy One visit his temple, and save souls. 

We need more Congregational churches at the South; but they can- 
not be built without aid from the Congregational Union. We beg that 
while the heart of this Society is in sympathy with, and its eyes are 
wide open to the wants of the bleak and frosty Northwest, a bit of that 
same sympathy from the heart and a glance from those wide-open eyes 
may be extended to the many openings among the flowers and perpetual 
springs of the " sunny South." — Rev. J. A. Jones, Jennings, La. 



A 'HOME-MADE" NEWSPAPER. 

The Church News, edited and published and printed by Rev. C. A. 
Mack, " in the interest of his little home missionary church at Glen 
"Ullin, Dak., in particular, and the Kingdom of Christ in general," is plac- 
ing useful information in the hands of his people, and arousing their en- 
thusiasm in all church work. This bright little paper, shedding blessed 
xays of light at the front, has our best wishes. We share with our 
readers a few pioneer glimpses in the following extracts: 

"Some of our zealous and ready members gathered at the church last 
Thursday, and gave the windows and floor a thorough cleaning." 

" "With pleasure we note a gain in promptness of attendance upon church 
services." 

" Our merchants have declared their intention to sell no goods on Sunday. 
Good! Now let all order-loving people sustain them, and we shall have moved 
one step nearer civilization. Sabbath desecration is barbarous, and tends to 
barbarism." 

"A fair number were in attendance at the first Sunday morning prayer- 
meeting." 

" The Sunday-school has a few books as the beginning of a library. We all 
hope that the library will grow, and shall be glad of any help in the line of 
hooks suitable for a Sunday-school. Mrs. W. W. Clark has handed in one book." 

"The 'Children of the Kingdom' is the pastor's class of catechumens.*' 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 263 

•' The ' Daniel's Band ' has not yet met this season. That work will be re- 
sumed alter the 'Children of the Kingdom" are through with their term of twelve 
or fifteen lessons." 

" If we may not aspire to be the coming Church paper of North Dakota, \\ . 
ran at least rattle around in that niche until it is better filled." 

" Editorial. — It must be admitted that all, whether church-members or 
only attendants upon the meetings, or neither, are interested in the support of 
the church. It would be a public calamity to have no Christian church in Glen 
rilin. Public morals are better, property is worth more, life and property are 
n. ore secure, because cf the presence here of Christian churches. It is evident, 
therefore, that every resident of the town and vicinity, yes, every non-resident 
owner of property here, is under obligation to the church from a worldly stand- 
point: and business sagacity will lead each resident and each owner of propertv 
here to aid in maintaining a Christian church. There is no need, therefore, of 
any apology in offering to any person among us an opportunity to subscribe to 
the support of the church. It is further evident that there is a close connection 
between liberality in giving to church-support, and a healthy piety — a high tone 
of spirituality. Genuine Christianity devises liberal things. A Christian cannot 
grow in grace as he ought and be neglectful of his duty in giving. We ought, 
therefore, to cultivate the grace of giving. It does not become a person or a 
church to receive more aid than is needed. A healthy self-respect demands self- 
support to the limit of ability. Duty to ourselves, duty to other needy churches, 
and duty to the regions yet without a Christian church, demands that we help 
ourselves to the full extent of our ability, ami approach self-support as rapidly 
as possible. Only as each one conscientiously gives all that he ought shall the 
church prosper, or shall we do our duty to others, or fulfill our obligation to 
Him who gave up all for us." 



A Confession. — A pastor sat before the editorial desk, and, with 
Christian candor, said : " I confess I have never taken much stock in 
your stories about Home Missionaries and their iciv^s, who actually 
help with their own hands in building churches and parsonages. But 
I've just come from Atlanta, Ga., where I found a genuine Home Mis- 
sionary, with plane and saw and hammer well in hand, trying to enlarge 
his little church building to accommodate the crowds who failed to get 
into the meetings for want of room. When I left, he was painting the 
house, while his wife set the window-glass! This man preaches the 
pure gospel to crowds of ' poor whites ' down there. He and his wife 
and children live among them, sharing with them food, clothing, and 
their small salary. Many of these have been brought to Christ already, 
and I have come here to say that such a man ought to have clothino- 
sent him to use among those poor people, and money to finish a place 
of worship for them, and Christian literature to help feed their hungry 
souls !' : 



WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT. 



RESIGNATION OF MRS. SHELTON. 
At a stated meeting of the Executive Committee, on Wednesday, 
September 7th, a communication having been received from Mrs. H. M. 
Shelton, tendering the resignation of her office, it was unanimously 



264 the home missionary. October, 

Resolved, That, in view of the low state of the treasury and of cir- 
cumstances that make practicable a temporary retrenchment in the ex- 
penses of the Woman's Department of this Society, the resignation of 
Mrs. H. M. Shelton, as Secretary of that Department, to take effect 
September 30th, be accepted. 

Resolved, That this Committee express its grateful recognition of 
the untiring zeal and fidelity with which, for more than four years 
and a half, Mrs. Shelton has fulfilled the duties of her office ; of the 
marked progress which the Department has made under her care ; 
of the bright prospects for future enlargement which cheer her as 
she lays down the work. 

The Committee warmly reciprocate all that Mrs. Shelton has said 
of "the invariable courtesy and kindness" that have made this associa- 
tion in Christian labor so pleasant from its beginning to its end. Her 
uniformly genial and cordial spirit will not soon pass from our memory, 
and cannot fail to win for her a warm place in the esteem of those with 
whom she may hereafter labor for the advancement of the cause of our 
Divine Redeemer — a work to which, in this country and on heathen 
ground, her active life has been so successfully devoted. 

With all best wishes for her continued happiness and usefulness 
through years to come, the Committee cordially commend Mrs. Shel- 
ton to the confidence and esteem of all Christian people, and to the 
eternal favor of our common Lord. 

For the present, and until circumstances warrant the appointment 
of a successor of Mrs. Shelton, communications concerning the Woman's 
Department may be addressed to the officers of the Society. 



SIX POINTS 

CONCERNING THE DAKOTA WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION. 

First. — The scope of our work includes all the interests represented 
by our National Societies except the work in foreign lands, which is 
carried on by the A. B. C. F. M. 

Second. — It includes many lines of Christian work in which women 
are especially active, and in which it seems to be her mount of oppor- 
tunity to do vastly more than she is now doing to fill "basket and 
store'" for the toilers in the field. 

Third. — The churches of Dakota are feeble, and none know the 
struggles of the brave pioneers better than those who are in very new 
settlements. But as a habit of thought and of giving toward Christian 
interests on the part of the child is invaluable, so every dollar given by 
a feeble church is educating that church in a love that seeketh not its 
own, and which will result in that enlargement of heart which shall 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 265 

make of this great aud rich state one given to benevolence and deeds 
of love for the Master. 

Fourth. — The benefits of organization and united action have again 
and again been made evident by experience. And the parent National 
Societies express the wish that the woman's auxiliaries of every state 
shall send all funds to their state treasurer. The treasurer of our 
Territorial Union is Mrs. C. G. Black, Plankinton, Dak. 

Fifth. — Sewing societies, Aid societies, etc., can easily become 
auxiliaries of our Home Missionary Union; and mission bands for 
children are invaluable auxiliaries to our work. 

Sixth. — The president and secretary, acting as committee for "Plan 
of Work," recommend the system of weekly cent pledges as one which 
promotes systematic, thoughtful and efficient giving. Blank pledges 
and other helps will be sent to the officers of any church or auxiliary 
on application to the vice-president of their association, who will be 
glad to aid in organizing new auxiliaries. 

Let each association vice-president do what she can to bring the 
association collections up to the amount designated, each minister be 
induced to wake up the people by missionary sermons, and some live 
woman be appointed in each church to take pledges and make monthly 
or quarterly collections, and the result cannot be other than surprising 
and satisfactory. Mrs. T. M. Hills, President. 

Mrs. W. H. Thrall, Secretary. 



MRS. JONES'S PICTURE. 

BY MRS. WILLIAM KINCAID. 



Mrs. Jones, of Jonesville. did not quite like the state of things in 
their church. She was full of missionary zeal. Indeed, had you known 
her name before she became Mrs. Jones, you would have acknowledged 
her direct descent from missionary stock. What troubled Mrs. Jones? 
The women in the thriving Jonesville church, the only one in the 
pretty farming village, were well organized in missionary work. They 
had their pleasant monthly meetings, home and foreign, both well sus- 
tained, but the brethren and the children seemed, somehow, left out. 

Here was a problem for this busy woman. All one drowsy summer 
day, while the children were at school, as she swept her rooms and 
churned her cream, she thought about it. She decided that the first 
step was a picture for the bare spot back of the superintendent's desk, 
in the Sunday-school room. It was a pleasant room, where the prayer- 
meetings and socials of the church were held ; and it was strange no 
one had noticed how bare that place on the wall was. Mrs. Jones was 



'266 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



October, 



a prompt woman. She wrote to a friend in the city, and he painted it 
for her. It was not a landscape or a portrait ; but on its blue ground, 
with its pretty oak frame, were these hieroglyphics, all in gold : 



A. 


B. C. F. M. 


A. 


H. M. S. 


A. 


M. A. 


A. 


C. U. 


A. 


C. & Ed. Soc. 


C. 


S. S. & Pub. Soc. 


N. 


W. Ed. Com. 



Next Sabbath it was pat up. Were any of ths church-members of 
Jonesville puzzled over it ? Try it, as Mrs. Jones did, and see. 

" And these words shall be upon thine heart ; and thou shalt teach 
them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou 
sittest in thy house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou 
liest down and when thou risest up, and thou shalt bind them for a 
si<*n upon thine hand, and they shall be for frontlets between thine 
eyes. And thou shalt write them upon the door-posts of thine house 
and upon thy gates."' 

The superintendent had in these letters a constant text. He was a 
good Congregationalist. These letters represented to him the work 
which his denomination was doing for the spread of the gospel over 
the face of the earth. He wished the children to understand them. 
He conferred with Mrs. Jones. The next teacher's meeting saw him 
ready with his plan. Thus far the Sunday-school had used their weekly 
collections for their own needs. They had gotten very little, for they 
had needed very little. Now the superintendent suggested that they 
mi^ht spare their collection once a month for the sake of the world. 
On this Sabbath, too, he gave fifteen minutes to the cause. How much 
can be accomplished in fifteen minutes ! He drilled the children on 
the strange letters over and over again, until even the little tots of the 
infant class knew them by heart. Mrs. Jones always had the brightest 
news from the front in the work of all these Societies to suggest to the 
young men and women, who vied with each other in preparing these 
fifteen-minute programmes. What is the result? Missionary Sunday 
has come to be a great day in that church. The children like it ; the 
young people plan for it with recitation, incident and song (all in fif- 
teen minutes); the older people stay that Sunday, and the collection as- 
tonishes everybody. Said a friend to Mrs. Jones the other day, " Do 
you see how this new interest in saving the world is changing our 
young people?" And Mrs. Jones said softly, "Yes. There will be 
some missionaries here pretty soon, and many more who pray and 
give." 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 2G7 

When pray er-inee ting night came, the letters were again discussed 
They were in too conspicuous a place to be ignoi*ed. 

" Let us," said the pastor to Mrs. Jones, " study the work of one 
Society every month/' They did this for a year, and had a full-fledged 
missionary concert before they knew it. At the end of the year they 
were ready to call it by its right name, to appoint a gentleman and lady 
to arrange for every month, and to print a programme for the year. 
Now that the Societies, each in its own field, were understood, with 
Mrs. Jones's picture always before them for reference, they took a 
wider outlook, and discussed (for this was in 1887) such subjects as 
these: "Bishop Harrington, the Martyr of Uganda"; "Work among 
the Mormons"; "The China Inland Mission"; "The Indians of North 
America"; " History of the Madura Mission"; " Strategic Points in the 
Far West"; " The Story of the Sandwich Islands"; '• The New South": 
" Christianity in Fiji." Some excellent suggestions, too, were put upon 
the back of the printed programmes. " The concert to be held on the 
first prayer-meeting evening of each month." " The committee ap- 
pointed to provide a programme for their respective evenings, engage 
.as far as possible the younger members of the church in the exercises." 
" The programme to be placed beforehand in the hands of the pastor, 
who shall preside." "Brief, specific prayers to be a prominent feature 
of each evening." "A collection for missions will be taken at the close 
of each concert." 

What would Mrs. Jones's plans, well carried out, do for our 
churches? With God's blessing, they would set the church on fire to 
save the world, even as the little brush heaps here and there, kindled 
by baby hands, will grow under a fanning breeze into the great confla- 
gration. 



A VOICE FROM FLORIDA. 



As we are all learners one of another, and even the lowliest may 
bring the germ of a thought, we will tell how we have raised a small 
sum of money for the A. H. M. S. Although a home missionary 
church, we had a branch of the W. B. M. of eleven members organized 
very soon after we were gathered into a society. The second year 
doubled our membership. As some of our members felt that we ought 
to do more for Home Missions than simply through our annual contri- 
bution, it was proposed last April that a " birthday box''' for Home 
Missions be prepared, and each member whose birthday came in the 
month of the meeting was to deposit an offering besides the monthly 
amount to the W. M. S.; so a box was made ready for those offerings. 
On opening this month we find five dollars as the result; another year 
we hope for still better results, although we are preparing to build a 



268 the home missionary. October, 

church, and only by self-denial and sacrifice can this be done. But if 
" God and one make a majority," his blessing can so multiply our gifts 
that we shall be successful. — Secretary. 



A SIGNIFICANT LETTER. 

My dear Friend. — I have been hoping that you would come in 
some Friday afternoon and visit my " Spanish Industrial." At no pre- 
vious time of the Spanish work has the outlook been so encouraging as 
now. The Industrial has grown from twenty to sixty members, and I 
am now planning to begin another in Brooklyn early in the autumn. 
A Sunday-school has already grown out of our Industrial which prom- 
ises to increase in numbers faster than teachers can be found for the 
classes, or than I can provide the seats for them. 

We have had fourteen conversions during the year, and I now look 
forward to each Friday's meeting with delight rather than dread; for 
now we have those who have found Christ to be precious, and who so 
surround and aid us that we now each week expect new and precious 
experiences in seeing some coming from darkness to light. 

An old lady of sixty-three and a " Romanista' 1 who is very regular in 
her attendance remarked as she c^ine in last week : " I was very ill three 
days and feared I could never be in this happy meeting again, but I found 
great comfort and peace in lifting my heart to God in prayer, and 
feared not to die without a priest near me, having learned here that 
there is only one mediator, even Christ Jesus." 

An intelligent Christian Cuban who was for some years a teacher in 
Mexico happened in three weeks since at one of our meetings. I asked 
him to give a short talk to the women, and he took for his subject the 
Bible. All listened attentively to what he said. Several Romanistas 
were present, one of whom became cpiite excited, and interrupted him, 
when he spoke of the Bible being kept from the people by the priests, 
with the exclamation, " They have a right to keep it sacred." A brisk 
discussion followed in which it was plainly seen that the speaker had 
the interest and sympathy of all. As they passed out that day one by 
one, I knew by the tearful eyes and trembling tones that many had on 
that day come to a decision for Christ. Since then there has been 
much eager questioning about the things of the Bible, and attentive in- 
terest that is delightful to see. That meeting was a test for many of 
the timid, fearful ones, for they plainly saw, " He that is not with me is 
against me." 

The week following, another unexpected visitor was in, who early in 
life was one of the chancel boys of a Roman Catholic church, but who 
two years ago in one of the Cooper Institute meetings in this city found 
Christ. In a very earnest way he urged his countrywomen to study 
God's precious Word and obey it rather than the traditions of men, and 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 269 

after reminding them of the privilege tliey had in meeting as they did 
each Friday for instruction in sewing and instruction in spiritual things 
urged all present who had not found Christ, to seek him. Soon after 
he left, one of the sweet singers, a city missionary, came, and as she 
sang " The Master is calling thee to-day, 1 ' the hearts of several were 
thrilled, and one afterward remarked, " My heart could not resist those 
sweet tones so full of tears. I do wish to follow Christ, the Master." 

Dear Mrs. Sehauffler favored us with a visit one day. Her presence 
was a benediction, and after she left, we sang " A I Clelo voy," "To 
Heaven I go," and one exclaimed, " I wish to go that I may there meet 
that beautiful lady!" 

Do you remember, a year ago, when speaking of this work, I said, 
'* I can see hardly one step ahead," that you remarked, " It is His work 
and he can in ways of his own prosper it, even if you do not see." He 
has done so. The room, the assistant, the means for the past year were 
all provided. And now, although my treasury is empty, I am able to 
go on trustfully and confidently because of the past experience. 

The Sunday-school, which began only one month ago with three 
little gypsy Spanish waifs who have only a box for me to sit upon when 
I call upon them — has now some very intelligent young men and women 
in a Bible class, and thirty others, of ages from ten to sixteen, have 
promised to come as soon as a teacher can be found for them In this 
Sunday-school work I have an earnest helper in a converted Cuban, a 
teacher from Mexico, who has charge of the Bible class, and also the 
aid of a Spanish girl of twenty, who is a lovely Christian. 

So you see, dear friend, I have reason to thank God and take cour- 
age, for I believe that earnest Christian helpers among the Spanish 
themselves are being raised up to push on His own work. — 3Iiss C. M. 
Strong, 127 E. 10th St., JVew York City. 



OUK YOUNG PEOPLE. 



LETTEK No. 11. 

A BOHEMIAN PICNIC. 

My Dear Young Friends :— I think you all like picnics. I notice 
the little eyes usually shine when you meet a company of children with 
well-filled baskets, bound for the grove, river or lake, to have a good 
time. Then you will like to hear about the picnic for the Bethlehem 
Bohemian Mission Sunday-school of Cleveland, Ohio. Thursday, July 
28th. was the day fixed upon, and we went to Rocky River, over four 
hundred of us. I think the Bohemians enjoy picnics better even than 



270 the home missionary. October,. 

the Americans do. The fathers get a day off and leave the mills, the 
mothers shut up the houses, and the whole family, baby and all, go. 
The saloon-keeper's family, the grocer's family, the day laborer's fam- 
ily, and, too, the rich and cultured from beautiful homes, who come as 
teachers Sabbath after Sabbath, are all there. We are taught to re- 
gard the Bethlehem picnic as a time for large missionary work. To 
many of the fathers and mothers it is the best chance of the year to 
hear about gospel truth, and see what Christian love is. Bethlehem 
means to them all that they know of God's truth and love. We had 
tickets for our picnic, for which the children paid ten cents, and grown 
folks twenty-five; and it made some of the small boys look very proud 
to bring a round silver dollar with which to buy tickets for the family. 
Up on the bluff at Rocky River we had a large grove with swings and 
hammocks, Lake Erie's blue waters lying out broad and clean and 
sparkling before us, the old oaks everywhere standing around us, and 
the fresh breeze playing through them. Below there were pavilions, 
and lemonade, and the beach. There were boats for rowing on the 
lake and very pretty river, and there was wading for the little folks 
and a whole out of- doors world with all its room and the sky for a roof. 
One boy, twenty-one years old, just wanted to lie under the trees 
ami in the hammock and take it all in. With one iron foot and a very 
crooked back, he walks very lame everywhere except on the King's 
Highway. His father is a Bohemian carpet-weaver who drinks, and the 
home is a very poor one. Tom trundles along a cart with heavy rolls 
of carpeting often when he looks tired and sick. But a year and a half 
ago he gave his whole heart to the Lord Jesus. Last winter for weeks 
he was very sick, full of hard pain, and lying on a hard bed. But 
when asked how he was he would say, " I am happy." He likes to 
read, but they all make fun of him at home when he tries, and he has 
no time, besides. He loves the country and kind friends would send 
him there, only when his father is cross Tom can quiet him, so the 
mother is afraid to have him away. Do you wonder he was happy at 
the picnic ? 

Of course the small boys who could climb trees and swim like ducks, 
were happy, and they could be easily tempted with biscuit, meat, cake, 
blackberries and bright red plums. Then when they were eating, you 
could work a word in edgewise about their learning all they could in 
school, and minding their fathers and mothers at home, and never 
doubling up their fists, and speaking angry words to other children. 
You could talk to them about letting beer and tobacco alone and grow- 
ing to be pure-hearted and clean-mouthed boys ready to serve the dear 
Lord. It was pleasant to see the fathers who spoke with an oath, after 
you talked about swearing, check it next time. The mothers were 
happy when you noticed their babies, and were ready to hear about be- 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 271 

coming children of the Father in heaven. Mr. Schauffler, our Superin- 
tendent, had Bohemian papers and leaflets that he gave out, so the 
groups under the trees had something Letter to read than the story of 
the latest murder, in the penny press. 

There were two young men at our picnic who have just come over 
from Bohemia. They are gentlemen and scholars, and are going to 
work for their people here, studying a year in Oberlin first. Mr. 
Schauffler's heart was made glad by meeting one young woman wbo 
said, " I know I am a sinner. I know Christ has forgiven my sins. I 
want to work for my people." 

At four o'clock the happy groups gathered in the pavilion and had 
a good sing ; singing " Beautiful Zion," " Jesus, Saviour, pilot me," 
" Close to Thee," and other hymns. By half-past seven we were back 
in the city, many in the tucked-up little homes, but I think with a warm 
spot in their hearts, and some good words that had been spoken by 
superintendent or teacher, resting in their minds. It was a great thing 
for them to have an outing in the fresh air, but a greater to hear of the 
One who is "chief among ten thousand," God over all, and yet 
" tempted in all points like as we are." Dear children, these people 
need your money and prayers, that they may learn many more things 
about the way of salvation, and fully enter in. — From one who was 
there. 



DOES NT WANT TO BEAD. 



[Children, here is a letter from a man who doesn't want to read any more. 
What does he need? Write and tell me. — Editor.] 

your Postal Red would like to know how I became A subscriber to 
the home missionary allso how you got my name and Adress I took it 
out of the Once once never meant to again but as we fetch each others 
Mail others whould fetch all adressed to Me I never Bead but Part of 

the first Nomber 1 was A Early Setter in Neb Know all I want to 

About Indians Dont want no Missionary work to inform me if I go to 
teach Indians I want to Do it with A rifle in My hand just as much re- 
spect for Mormans as indians you say if I Dont Prefer to subscribe A 
nother year to let you know I say I never Did subscribe nor never 
Shall unless I see things Diferant to what I Do now. 



QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS. 



23. How long were the followers of John Huss persecuted on 
account of thsir religious belief? 

A. One hundred and sixty years. — //. 31. C. — JVeic York. 

■ 



272 the home missionary. October, 

24. What king released them from this persecution ? 
A. King Joseph II.— W. Q. B.—Pa. 

25. What is the crest of the Prince of Wales ? and how did England 
get that crest ! 

A. Three ostrich feathers. The " Black Prince," who was the son of 
Edward III. of England, killed John, the blind King of Bohemia, and 
took his crest, which was three ostrich leathers. This has been the 
•crest of the Prince of Wales ever since. — IV. S. — 3fass. 

26. What connection has Queen Victoria with the Bohemians ? 

A. She is a lineal descendant of Elizabeth, Queen of Bohemia. — W. 
a. JB.— Pa. 

27. How many Bohemians and Poles are there in this country who 
need the gospel, and how many missionaries are preaching it to them 
under Superintendent Schauffler's care? 

28. How many Germans are there in this country who need the 
gospel, and how many missionaries are preaching it to them under 
Superintendent Albrecht's care ? 

29. How many Scandinavians are there in this country who need the 
gospel, and how many missionaries are preaching it to them under 
Superintendent Montgomery's care ? 

30. Why are there so many people in this country who never hear 
the gospel preached ? 



A BOY'S LETTER FROM DAKOTA. 

Dear Home Missionary. — I hear that you want a letter from some 
Dakota boy or girl, so I thought I would tell you how our Sunday- 
school was started. It began at my house four years ago, and met 
there every Sunday for five months. Then we had to plaster, and 
couldn't have it there any longer. So then they met at a house a mile 
south of here. I forgot to say that there were fourteen scholars in all. 
In the winter we had to adjourn till the next spring. In about a year a 
school-house was built, and we were not sorry, I can tell you ! When 
my folks came here about six years ago, there wasn't a church in sight, 
or a building, or hardly anything, except a sod shanty. Now and then 
we would see a team, and everybody would have to run to see who it 
was, and where it was going, and find out all about it, and a little more, 
if they could. 

When we got the Sunday-school into the new school-house, we boys 
used to pick up coal on the railroad' track to keep the house warm. 
Now we go to a regular church, and have a good fire to get warm by. 
Our Sunday-school is very large now, and is under the care of Rev. A. 
J. Drake and his wife, and I enjoy it very much. I belong to the 
Young Helpers' Society, a kind of Christian Association. Mrs. Drake 



1887. THE HOME MISSIONARY. 273 

is the president. I live five and a half miles from Iroquois and three . 
miles from Esmond. They are trying to build a Congregational church 
at Esmond now. Please excuse all my mistakes, as there are a great 
many. — J. Harris II. — 1-4 years old. 



THE WORK AT HAND. — V. 

A Story for Girls. 

BY MRS. LOUISA P. HOPKINS. 

" Do the duty that lies nearest thee ; the next will already have become plainer." 

The Beginning of a Home Missionary Church. — Before they had time 
to knock, however, a woman opened the door. "What's the matter? 
Anybody hurt?" she said. "No," said Anna; "but we want to see Mr. 
Thurlow, who owns that little shop." "Daddy, here, come to the 
door." Soon the old man came, in his shirt-sleeves and hat, with his 
pipe in his mouth. It was afterward seen that all the men kept their 
hats on in the house as systematically as the boys went bare-headed 
out of doors. " What d'yer want o' me, miss ?" said Daddy. " We are 
going to have a Sunday-school down here, sir," said Lucia, " and we 
are looking for a house to have it in. The boys said that this shop be- 
longed to you, and we came to see if you would let it to us." 

" Well, well, there's some good 'uns left in the town yet ! I don't 
believe you can get anybody down here to go to a Sunday-school 
though, nor even to look at one. These young 'uns is an awful bad 
set ; but if yer can, yer welcome to my shop, though it needs a tremen- 
jous dredgin' out. But I'll help yer, and the old woman here, she'll bale 
it out and scour it up, and it may be decent after a while. When yer 
goin' to begin?" 

" We shall have the Sunday-school next Sunday," said Lucia, with 
her unflagging zeal pushing her to immediate accomplishment. " Can 
we go in and look at the room now ?" 

" Well, yes. I like to see yer decided ; now's as good a time as any 
to start. I'll open it for yer." 

The shop was soon thrown open. The children had many of them 
dispersed, and the rest stood gaping in at the open door. A glance at 
the room showed the girls that it would be just the right place, and 
they at once accepted the old man's offer to help them clean it. " We 
will be here," said Anna, "to-morrow afternoon; and if you can get the 
worst of the dirt out before then, we will wash the windows and paper 
the room, and get seats and an organ for it, so as to be ready by Sun- 
day to fill it with children." 

" Well, well," said the old man, " good luck to yer and a prosperous 
v'yage! I never see gals so sot on anything but what they brought it 



274 THE HOME MISSIONARY. October 

round. Til have it all right, decks cleared and baggage stowed, by to- 
morrow." 

" Thank you, sir," said the girls, warmly. " We did not expect to 
find any one so ready to help us, and so kind. It makes it quite easy 
for us." 

" That's nothin'," said the old man. " I like to see anybody ready 
to take hold." 

So, after a word of good- by to him, they walked back alone; for 
every child had now disappeared, while the old man and woman stood 
at the corner to watch them as they passed down the deserted street 
and drew near to the house before which the prince's-feather waved, 
and from the dim panes of whose windows peered George Washington 
and John Quincy Adams. Truly, a new thing was about to happen in 
the fishing village ! For, while many a gay party every year rode 
through it to the beach, who could remember when one of the fair com- 
pany had deigned to stop at its humble doors or speak to one of the 
rude and half-clad children that lolled or scpiatted along its raucldy 
margin? 

CHILDREN'S BOHEMIAN FUND. 

Previously acknowledge'] $1,7S2 22 

Massachusetts, Boston 17 50 

Brookfield, West 5 00 

Chelsea 1 00 

M. H. M. Soc 10 00 

Newton 10 00 

Newton Center 20 00 

Northfield . 25 no 

Spencer ! 12 50 

Wisconsin, La Crosse 20 (>0 

fl,9t3 22 



WOMAN'S FUND FOR MISSIONARY SALARIES. 

Previously acknowledged 2446 73 

Colorado, Colorado Springs 25 00 

$471 73 
Woman's Fund for Foreign Work $5,6S1 66 



MISSIONARY BOXES. 



For many years the ladies of our churches have helped this Society and cheered the 
homes of its missionaries with boxes of clothing and other useful articles. The continuance 
of these favors is earnestly solicited. To secure satisfactory preparation and just distribu- 
tion, attention is invited to the following suggestions. 

1. Apply to the Secretaries to designate a family needing such assistance, and state, 
if practicable, how soon a box will probanly be sent. 

2. If a family is selected without applying to the Secretaries, notify them without delay 
so as to guard against a duplication of gifts. 

3. It several months should elapse before the box is ready to be sent, ascertain from the 
Secretaries whether trie missionary's address remains as previously given. 

4. Mark the box plainly and indelibly, fasten it securely, and forward it to the missionary, 
not by express, but by a Forwarding Company, if practicable ; otherwise, as "fast freight,' 
Dy railroad, taking two receipts from the Company. 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



275 



5. Write to the missionary, inclosing one of these receipts, a list of the articles sent in 
the box, and the money, $2, $3, or $4, according to weight and distance, for the payment of 
freight (it it cannot be prepaid). Mention, also, the name of the person to whom a letter 
of acknowledgment should be addressed. 

6. lieport to the Secretaries the forwarding of the box, its estimated value, and the 
amount sent for freight, in order that the donation may be acknowledged in The Homb 
Missionary. 

7. If a box has been prepared, not for a specified family, but to ho assigned by the 
Secretaries, put into it a list of its contents, the name of the association or individual from 
whom it conies, and the address or the person to whom the missionary may send his letter of 
acknowledgment. 

B. Mark the box, "American Home Missionary Society, Bible House, Astor Place, New 
York," adding the name of the place from which it comes. 

9. Write to the Secretaries, inclosing money for freight, and stating the time when and 
the line by which the box was sent, its estimated value, and giving a list of contents to guido 
in the assignment of the box. Be careful to state the size of each adult, and the age and 
sex of each child for whom the clothing is intended, as boxes are not opened at the office. 

10. These donations are not deducted from the grants if the Society. It needs the same 
amount of money, therefore, in order to fulfill its stipulations with its missionaries, as if no 
such gifts were provided ; and we trust the friends of Home Missions will not withhold or 
dimmish their contributions of money in consequence of their giving other things that are 
needful 



WOMAN'S STATE H. M. ORGANIZATIONS. 



New Hampshire Female Cent Institution, org. 

1805, Miss Annie A. McFarland, Concord, Sec 
Minnesota Woman's Home MissiouarySoeiety, org. 

1878, Mrs. It. L. Chase, Minneapolis, Seo. 
Nebraska Woman's Home Miss. Association, org. 

Oct., 1874, Mrs. E. H. Baker, Sutton, Sec. 
Maine, Woman's Missionary Auxiliary, org. June, 

1880, Mrs. Levi L. Paine, Bangor, Sec. 
Michigan, Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. May, 1881, Mrs. Leroy Warren, Lansing, 

Sec. 
Kansas, Woman's Home Missionary Society, org. 

Oct., 18S1, Mrs. Addison Blanciiard, Topeka, 

Sec. 
Ohio, Woraans Home Missionary Union, org. 

Mav, 1882, Mrs. Flora K.Kegal, Oberlin, Sec. 
New York, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Oct., 1SS3, Mr3 C. U. Creegan, Syracuse, 

Sec. 



Wisconsin, Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. Oct., 1883, Mrs. c. Matter, Brodhead, Sec. 
North Dakota, Woman's Home Missionary Soci- 
ety, org. Nov., 1S83, Miss S. E. JuUd, Fargo, 

Sec. 
South Dakota, Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

org. Sept., 18S4, Mrs. W. H. Thrall, Armour, 

Sec. 
Connecticut, Woman's Home Missionary Union 

org.Jan.,1885, Mrs. S. M. Hot chkiss, Hartford, 

Sec. 
Missouri, Woman's Home Missionary Society, 

org. May, 188.", Mrs. E. P. Bronsou, 3luo 

Chestnut St., St. Louis, Sec. 
Illinois, Woman's Home Missionary Union, erg. 

May, 1835, Mrs. C. H. Taintor, Chicago, Sec. 
Iowa, Woman's Homa Missionary Union, 

org. June, 1886, Miss Ella Marsh, Grinnell, Sec. 



APPOINTMENTS IN AUGUST, 1887. 



Not in, commission last year. 

Allen, Abram 8., Hannibal, Mo. 

Barnes, Miss Cora, McAllister, Ind. Ter. 

Cooper, John E., Addison, Mich. 

Countermine, John D., Albany. X. Y. 

Derrick, Columbus. Hillsboro and out-station, Or. 

Gibbons, W. C, Leadville, Colo. 

Gordan, Robert, Ransom and Prattville, Mich. 

Jones, William, Custer City, Dak. 

Latham, Ernest R., Croton, Mich. 

Ligget, Miss Sallie A., Rogers, Ark. 

Mason, John R., Maybee and Raisinville, Mich. 

Morse, William P., West Kittitass and South 
Mountain, Wash. Ter. 

Todd, David E., Apopka, Clarkonia and Merri- 
mack, Fla. 

Washburn, William S., Bon Homme, So. Dak. 

Weeks, Frank M., Boune Perre, Mo. 

WiLiains, Miss R., Rogers. Ark. 

Wood, Charles F., Forest Grove, Or. 

Wright. Malan H., Port Sanilac and Carsonviile, 
Mich. 

Re-commissioned. 

Allen, William C, East Tawas and Tawas City, 

Midi. 
Anderson, John S., Tacoma, W. Wash. Ter. 
Avery, Holly H., Almena, Kan. 



Baker, Henry R., Janesville and New Ri chland, 
Minn. 

Balcti, Frederic H., Hood River and East Hoed 
River, Or. 

Beecher, Edward, D.D., Parkville, N. Y. 

Blorniield, Frank, West Branch, Mich. 

Bowman, David E., Eureka, Cal. 

Br own, Henry C, N'orth Springfield, Mo. 

Colwell, Henry J., Grand Meadow, Minn. 

Cooper, James, Severy, Western Park and cut- 
station, Kan. 

Cooper, Samuel B., West Pittston and E xeter, Pa. 

Crane, Henry C, Omaha, Neb. 

Dunham, Dvvisrhr, Howard, Rock Cre ek, Mound 
Branch, Game Creek and Fairview, Kan. 

Eaton, Dauforth L., Freeport, Mich. 

EUis, Walter M., Mayville aud viciuitv, No. Dak. 

Emoieton, John S., Geuda Springs, Kan. 

Emerson, Fred. C, Lake Benton an d Tyler, 
Minn. 

Fowler, William C, Livingston, Hon. 

Frame, Ezra E., Buffalo Gap, So. Dak. 

George, Norton R., Hill City, Edmond, Gettys- 
burg and Lf ne Tree, Kau. 

Graf, John F., Springfield, Mo. 

Holcomb, Gilbert T., Evangelist in, Mo. 

Howell, James, Bala ami viciDity, Kan. 

Jones, John A., New York Lauding, Norton vUle 
and Summerville. Cal. 

Kellogg, Joseph F., Tyrone, Mich. 



276 



:he home missionary. 



October, 



Lippard, James H., Cheney, Kan. 

Liston, Robert T., Benson, Ariz. 

McCraeket , William, Sharpsb irg, Penn. 

McKesson, Charles L., Parsons and Siiem Sta- 
tion, Kaa. 

Markhain, KeubenF., Kirwin, Liberty and Gray 
school-house. Kan. 

Marvin, Joun T., Appleton and Silver Grove, 
Minn. 

Minnis, T tonus W., Wichita, Kan. 

Myers, Hiram, Maize and Colwich, Kan. 

Palmer. Oscar A., Downs, Kan. 

Pierce, Daniel H., Vienna and out-stations, Mich. 

Pinch, Pears*, Newton, Kan. 

Peregrine, Philip K.. Custer and Salem, Minn. 

Quaite, Hobert, Gen. Miss, and Evangelist in 
OHio. 

Scrogrgs, Miss Elia W., Rogers, Ark. 

Scroggs, Joseph W., Kogeis, Ark. 

Singer, Kdwin J., Ritzvilie and Pasco Junction, 
E. Wajh. Ter. 



Skinner, Edward, Blue Rapids and Marshall Co., 

Kan. 
Smith, James M., Hancock and Lake Emily, 

Minn. 
Smith, L. Adams. Cellaand vicinpv, Kan. 
'fade, E»ir g O.. Coney Island, N Y. 
Taylor, David P., Bidweil, Cedarville and Lake 

City, ;al. 
Thayer. Henry E., Denver, Colo. 
1'odd. John W., Barnesville, viinn. 
ronilin, David R., Gen. Miss, and Evangelist in 

Oaio. 
Trimble. Georce W., Tipton and Alida. Cal. 
Wateiman, Alfred T., Onekama,Mich. 
Webb, Miss Mary G.. Rovers, Ark. 
VVVbster, Asher C , Orion and out-stations, Mich. 
Wikoff, Harrv H.. Sonoma and out-station, Cal. 
Wilcox, Warren P., Ada and E 1st Paris, Mich. 
Williams, Clinton E., Ellis, Kan. 
Wright, Reuben B., South Pueblo and Bessemer, 
Colo. 



■RECEIPTS IN AUGUST, 1887. 



MAINE— $101.99. 

Freeport, First, by C. W. Longren $18 64 

G >rham, oy Rev. J. Ridlon 33 79 

Hampden, Fust Cong. Sunday-school, 

by Rev. S.D. Towne 10 00 

Limerick, by Rev. T. 8. Perry 12 06 

Wells, B.Maxwell 27 50 

NEW HAMPSHIRE-$237.40. 
Received by Hon. L.D. Stevens, 
Treas. N. H. H. M. Soc: 

Henniker |S3 40 

Milton 15 0J 

Pelham 50 00 

Penacook, Mrs. A. W. Fiske.. 7 00 

155 40 

Claremont, Mrs. Washburn's Sunday- 
school class 6 00 

Gorham, Rev. G. F. Wright 1 00 

Lyme, by Rev. >3. B. Butler 40 0o 

Mancnester, A Friend 35 oo 

YERMO NT— $185.32. 

Chelsea, by Mrs. W . P. To wnsend 8 23 

Manchester, Ch. $61.34 ; S. G. Cone, $30. 91 34 

North Springfield, A Friend 1 00 

St. Johnsbury, North Ch., by W. C. 

Tyler 51 00 

South Hero, byT. J. Harris 8 25 

Wallingford, Two Friends a 50 

Westminster West, by H. H. Thompson. 3 00 
White River Junction, Mrs. C. H. 

Latham 20 00 

MASSACHUSETTS— $10,119.20; of which 

Legacy, $460.58. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. B. 
Palmer, Treas., $9,045 ; of which from 
First Cong. Sunday-school, East 
Hampton, Mass., $45; Special for In- 
dian Missions, $4.99 ; for Bohemian 
fund,$10 9,059 99 

Agawam, A Lady 2 00 

Becket, W. F. A. Sill, to const, two L. 
Ms 100 00 

Fall River, The Donor 10 00 

Fitchburg, Mrs. John Lowe, by Rev. J. 

Wood 6 00 

Longmeadow, T. P. Carleton 2 00 

Ludlow, Ladies of the Union Cn., by 
Mrs. J. E. Stevens 25 00 

Newburyport, Remainder of Legacy of 
Mrs. Susan B. Adams, by L. Dame, 
Ex 460 5S 

Newton Center, The Maria Furber Miss. 



Soc.of the Cong. Ch., for Children's Bo- 
hemian lund, by Miss Clara Hobart. . 20 00 

North Abington, R»v. C. Jones 1 00 

Pittsfield, Mrs. P.Allen 50 i0 

Miss E. Campbell 25 00 

Mrs. Mary S. B. Todd 10 uo 

South Earremont, by A. M. Smith 17 11 

Soutn Whitinsville, adu'l, byE. Whiton. 209 16 

Weliesley Hills, "u" loo 0o 

Williamstown, First, by C. S. Cole 21 36 

RHODE ISLAND— $70.00. 
Barrington, L. B. Kendall, to const. 

Rev. J. W. Col well a L. M 50 00 

Newport, Mrs. E. D. W. Thayer 15 00 

Pawtucket, A Thank-off eiing, by Rev. 

A.McGregor 5 00 

CONNECTICUT* — $5,228.76; of which 
Legacies, $2,300.00. 

Miss. Soc. Conn., W. W.Jacobs, Treas., 

by Rev. W. H. Moore, Sec 12 38 

Received by F. T. Jarman : 
New Haven, Lyman Osborn.. $500 00 
North Haven, E. Dickerman. . 2 00 

502 00 

Bethel, A Friend 5 00 

Branford, H. G.Harrison 10 00 

Chester, "I. O." 5 00 

Colchester, Miss Eliza M. Day, dec, by 

E.P. Hicks 100 00 

Columbia, by S. F. West 17 00 

Connecticut, A Friend 50 00 

East Woodstock, by J. M. Paine 27 00 

Greenwich, From the estate of Miss 
Rachel K. Mead, by the Misses Hannah 

and Almira Mead l.noo 00 

Hartford, Roland Mather, Esq '50n 00 

A Friend 100 00 

Litchfield, A Friend 5 00 

New Haven, Dwight Ch., Mrs. Nelson 

Hall 50 00 

New London, From the Trust Estate of 

Henry P. Haven 500 00 

North d eld, Legacy ot Samuel H. Guern- 
sey, by F. H. Catlin. Ex 800 00 

Norfolk, by J. N. Cowles 200 00 

Northford, by E. Smith 40 CO 

Norwich, E. A. Huntington 5 00 

Ridgefield, by A. L. Pad lock 19 08 

RocKville, Second, by E. C. Chapman.. 100 00 
Sjmers, Legacy of Sanford M. Billings, 

by W. H. Billings, Ex 1,000 00 

South Windsor, F. L. Olcott, In memo- 
riam 5 00 



1887. 



THE HOME MIS NONARY. 



277 



Stratford, Ch., of which $23 inon. con.: 
and from Oroucquc nion. con., $7..">o, 
bv Mrs. S. A. Talbot, to const. K. C. 

Wood a U M $61 30 

Terr) ville, Elizur Fein) . . 3 00 

Wnitnevville, A flunk-offering, by J. 

M. Payne 42 oo 

Winthrop, Two Sisters 10 00 

Woolbndge, Home Miss. Soc, by \V. 
M. Beejher 54 00 

NEW rOHK— $8,6T7.«0. 

Ashville, bv E. L. Kelso 12 60 

Batavu, A Friend 10 00 

Brooklyn, " 11. S. W.."$10; A Friend, 

$».... 12 CO 

Candor, by E. A. Booih 50 00 

Chenango, A Friend 12 00 

Eldred, bv Kev. H. P. Hamilton 1 25 

Elizabehtown, A FrieDd — 5 00 

Frewsburgh, Cong. Sunday -school, 

Home Mission class Mrs. E. Duraud, 

by Miss H. N. Hazeltine 5 00 

Hopkinton, A Friena of Missious 50 00 

Madison, by Rev. B. D. Peck 4 25 

New York City, Isaac E. Smith, $2,100; 

A Friend, $200; S. f . Gordon, $50 2,350 00 

Ogdensburgh, bv Rev. J. S. Ainslie — 11 50 

Parish ville, by Rev. O. C. Barnes 4 00 

Smyrna, Fiist, by M. C. Dixon 50 00 

NEW JERSEY— $6.00. 
Manchester, by Rev. E. P. 
Newark, B 
Hood 

PENNSYLVANIA— $120.00. 
Beaver Meadows, by Rev. E. T. Grif- 
fith 

Philadelphia, Frank M. Miller 100 00 



Allen.... 
Roby, by Rev. G. 



A. 



5 00 
1 00 



Plymouth, bv Rev. A. H. Howell, 
wilkesbarre, by Rev. F. Gwjnne. 



10 00 

5 00 



GEORGIA— $2.00. 
Savannah, Pilgrim Ch. of Woodville, 
by Ilea. J. Loyd 

ARKANSAS— $4.50. 

Eureka, by Rev. R. H. Read 

INDIAN TERRITORY-$5.00. 

Lehigh and McAllister, by Rev. W. H. 
Hicks 

ARIZONA-J12.50. 

Benson, by Rev. R. T. Liston 

TESNESSEE— $9.40. 

Soddy, by Rev. L. Morgan 

OHIO— $591.59; of which Legacy, $50.00. 
Received bv Rev. J. G. Frazer: 
Bristulville, Two ladies of 

Cong. Ch $1 00 

Sunday-school, by B. J. Cha- 

pin, for Debt 9 00 

Chardon, Oh., by Rev. T. D. 
Phillips, of which, from Rev. 
A. r. Reed, PlainvUle, Conn., 

$10 22 01 

Toledo, Central Ch., by E. Man- 
ning 



5 00 



12 50 



9 60 



Received by S. P. Churchill, 
Treas. Cleveland Bohemian 
B >ard, July: 

Atwater $4 52 

Cleveland, First 5 00 

Jennings Avenue Ch 52 50 

Hudson 2 00 

Madison, Mrs. H. B. Eraser 200 00 

Williamsford 2 11 

Atwater, bv H. E. Brush, in full, to 

const. Miss Jet>a Parshall a L. M 

Collin wood, by Rev. C. L. Hamlen 



East Liverpool, Rev. H. D. Kltchel, 

D.D 

Port Recovery, bv Kev. M. W. Diggs.. 

oberllrj, Firs', bv ii. c. Boated 

Onlo, Ch*. and Indtvlonals, by Rev. R. 

Q'laife 

Steuben. Legacy of Levi Piatt, by J. M. 

Wright, Ex 

West Andover, by H. Holcomb 

1NDI VNa— t'0.91. 

Fremont, by Rev. J. R. Preston 

ILLINOIS— $450.00; of which Legacy, 
$440.00. 

Chicago, On account of Legacy of Har- 
riet B. Whittlesey, by W. H. Bradley 

for Kx's 

Plymouth, Mrs. R. C. Burton 

MISSOURI— $197.81. 
Woman's II. M. Soc, by Mrs. II. 
A. Brown, Treas.: 

Amity $3 00 

Breckenndge, Ladies of the Ch. 1 i u 

Cheltenham if) 00 

Clyde 4 51 

Hamilton, Ladies of the Ch 6 50 

Kansas City, First 50 oo 

Mead ville. 2 50 

North Springfield, Pilgrim Ch.. 1 no 

Pierce City, Fir t 15 0J 

Pleasant Hill, Cn.,byG.M. Kel- 
logg 10 00 

St. Joseph, Tabernacle Ch 5 oo 

St. Louis, First Ch 8 00 

St. Louis, Olive Branch Ch 1 00 

Ch. of the Redeemer 1 00 

Sedalia 3 47 

Springfield, Central Ch 5 00 

Vinita, Ind. Ter 1 00 

Bevier, $5.S0; Honey Creek, $3.40; Ka- 

hoka, $i.33, by kev. G. T. Holcombe. 

Breckenndge and Utica, by Kev. D. C. 

Mcintosh 

De Soto, by Rev. E. E. Webber 

Eldon, by Rev. J. Vetter 

Joplin, Young People's Soc. of Chris- 
tian Endeavor of the Tabernacle Ch., 

by Emma V. Sellars 

Mead ville, by Rev. E. C. W. Hill 

Republic, First, by R. Hathaway 

Springfleid, by Rev. J. F. Graf 

MICHIGAN— $400.17. 
Received by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, 
Treas. Woman's Home Miss. 
Union : 

Allegan $10 00 

Covert, L. M. S., $11.64; Chil- 
dren, $1.16 12 SO 

Dougla?, Turee Ladies l 25 

Greenville 20 12 

Hartford 4 00 

Imlay City 10 00 

Lansing, W. H. M. 8., $23.83; 
Sunday-school, Miss. Soc, 

$7.33 31 16 

Mattawan 10 00 

Nashville 6 00 

North Dorr, Ladies' Indl. Soc, 
$5.00 ; Sunday-school, for 

children's work, $2.50 7 50 

Olivet, Ladies' Benev. Soc 10 00 

Yicksburg 10 00 

Saginaw Conference: 
Blackmar, W. H. M. S...$l 50 

Bridgeport 3 50 

East Saginaw, W. H.M. S.1S 00 
Essexvnle, W. H. M. S.. 5 50 
East Tawas, W. H. M. S. l 50 

30 00 



$25 00 
S 00 

86 11 



50 00 
14 50 



440 00 
10 00 



27 98 


10 55 


18 00 

10 00 

50 


13 00 
8 00 

4 53 

5 25 



40 44 
10 55 



Almira, First Ch., by Rev. E. Linkletter 
Bronson and Gilead, by J. M. Suther- 
land 

Chase, by Rev. J. Nicol 



162 83 
3 50 



4 18 

5 00 



278 



THE HOME MISSIONAKY. 



October,. 



Cheboygan, by Kev. W. S. Bugbey $13 1G 

Columbus, by Rev. W. I. Huut. . . 5 00 

Cooper, Ch. and Sunday-school, by Rev. 

R. VV. Fletcher 15 71 

Crolon, by Kev. E. H. Latham 4 64 

Hay Lake, Rosedale aud White Settle- 
ment, by Kev. J. W. Holt 6 95 

Hortou's Bay and Hayes, by Rev. J. F. 

Crane 100 

Hudsonville, by J. C. Ablett 4 80 

Leiand, $7.1"; Northport, $10; Omena, 

(2.50, by Rev. C. D. Banister 19 60 

Maybee, $4.75 ; Raisinville, $4, by Rev. 

J. K. Mason 8 75 

Muskegon, by J. E. Smith 80 11 

Perry, $2.51 ; Kev. F. W. Bush, $2.49, 

by Rev. F. W. Bush 5 00 

Sou'rh Haven, First Cli., by Rev. M. A. 

Bullock, to const. G. W. Law a L. M. 50 00 

Statidish, by Kpv. D. Curry 2 50 

Wolverine, $3.73; Rondo, 81 cts., by 

Rev. M. Tuck 4 54 

WISCONSIN— $53.83. 

Received by Rev. D. Magous : 

Bloomer $10 00 

CiearLake 3 68 

River Falls 5 00 

IS 68 

Ashland, by Rev. G. A. Hood 5 15 

La Crosse, Cong. Sunday-school, for 
Children's Bohemian fund, by W. A. 
Batchelder 20 00 

West Superior, by Rev. T. W. Spans- 
wick 10 00 

IOWA-S20.00. 

Clinton, by Rev. M. W. Montgomery. . . 5 00 

Garnavillo, Rev. G. M.Porter 5 CO 

Jefferson, Kev. D. B. Eells 10 to 

M IN N ESOT A— $34n. 76. 
Received by Rev. J. H. Morley : 

Cash $1 30 

Duluth, Pilgrim Ch 14 00 

Forest Mills, Swedish Mission.. 3 00 

Lake City 13 60 

Minneapolis, Plymouth Ch 60 00 

91 90 
Received by Mrs. J. N. Cross, 
Treas. Minn. Woman's H. M. 
Soc: 

Alexandria $20 00 

Benson, Sunday-school 4 41 

Faribault, Ladies 64 00 

Minneapolis, Open Door, L. M. 

S 5 CO 

Northfield, Willing Workers, for 

Bohemian fund 25 no 

St. Paul, Plymouth Ch i9 90 

15S 31 250 21 
Received by Rev. D. Magnus: 

Brunswick... $3 00 

Fergus Falls 2 00 

Harris 50 

Isanti 2 oO 

Oxford 50 

Winnipeg Junction 2 00 

10 00 

Brownsville, Mrs. S. M. McHose 5 00 

Clavemout and Dodge Center, by Rev. 

F. S. Van Eps 6 10 

Custer and Salem, by Rev. P. K. Pere- 

griue 5 (10 

Detroit, by Kev. D. W. Morgan 12 00 

Duluth, Cong. Sunday-school, by W. C. 

Johnston 10 00 

Hancock and Lake Emily, by Rev. J. 

M.Smith ' 100 

Hutchinson, by H. W. Boyd 5 50 

Janesvilie and Monistown, by Rev. W. 

J. Parmelee 2 00 

Lakeland, Rev. J. Chandler 2 50 

Mentor, by Rev. W. W. McArthur 3 00 



Minneapolis, W. M. Bristoll $5 00 

Owatonoa, by J. W. BurcR 14 70» 

Rose Creek and Lyle, by Rev. J. S. 

Rounce 1 50 

Stillwater, by Rev. I. W. Carlson 3 00 

Wayzata, by Rev. A. D. Blakeslee 4 25 

KANSAS— $73.41. 
Buffalo, $2.73; Center Ridge, $4.66; 

Scatter Creek, $3.08, by Rev. J. Wilde. 10 47 

Capioma, by Rev. D. S. Hibbard 2 50 

Geuda springs, by Rev. J. S. Einhleton. 2 00- 
Hay Springs, by Kev. B. F. Diffen- 

bacner 4 00 

Kiowa, by Kev. F. Foster 5 00 

North Lawrence, by Rev. T. F. Norris. 5 00 

Osawatomie, by Kev. S. L. Adair 11 00 

Parsons, by Kev. C. L. McKesson 16 00 

Russell, by Kev. A. M. Pipes 5 00 

Severy and Western Park, by Rev. J. 

Cooper 7 44. 

Twelve Mile, by Rev. H. P. Page 2 00 

Wa ^aun^ee. First Ch. of Christ, by J. 

F. Willard 3 00- 

NEBRASKA— $41.37. 
Bradshaw and Randolph, by Rev. H. 

Geer 9 60 

Cortland and Pickrell, add'l, II. Bates.. 1 oa 

Free water, by Rev. J. W. Hadden 2 00 

Fi lend, by Rev. J. Lich 6 CO 

Gloversville and Park, by Rev. H. Grif- 
fith 3 50- 

Nelson and Spring Creek, by Rev. P. 

Weidmann — 1 25 

Pickrell, by Rev. H. Bates 2 00 

Santee Agency, Miss Edith Leonard 5 06 

Spriugview, by Rev. H. Bioss 3 52 

Stintton and Trenton, by Rev. G. W. 

Rich 7 50* 

NORTH DAKOTA— $19.31. 

Bismarck, A Friend 5 00 

Caledonia, W. H. M. Hoc, $6.66; Wal- 
cott, W. H. M. S., $12.65, by S. E. 
Judd 19 31 

SOUTH DAKOTA— $44.15. 
Received by Mrs. C. G. Black, 
Treas. Woman's H. M. Soc: 

Iroquois $3 00 

Onida 2 03 

Siuux Falls, Ch., $10; King's 

Daughters, $10 20 CO 

Yankton 8 68 

33 76 

Clark, by Rev. L. Kingsburv 1 50 

Huron, oy Rev. II. L. Thalberg 3 89- 

Po well, by Rev. J. T. Lewis 4 00 

Tulare and Redfield, by Kev. L. J. C. 
Geiek 1 00 

COLORADO— $52.00. 

Cole Creek, by Rev. A. A. Ellis 25 00 

Colorado springs, Woman's Miss. Soc. 
of Cong. Ch., by Harrier P. Campbell, 

for Woman's Dept 25 00 

Denver, by Rev. A. W. Coffman 2 OO- 

WYOMING— $9.50. 
Lusk, by Rev. T. Kent 9 50 

MONTANA— $15.00. 

Billings, by Rev. S. A.Wallace 10 CO 

Butle City, by Rev. J. B. Clark 5 CO 

CALIFORNIA— $170 .55. 
Bidwell and Cedarville. by B. F. Taylor 3 50 

Green Valley, by Kev. R. Taylor 10 00 

Lugonia, Rev. A. L. Park 100 00 

Oakland, First Ch., Mrs. W. F. Bowers, 

by G. Bui beck 25 00 

Bv Rev. W. II. Cooke 5 00 

By Rev. W. S. Hamlin 5 

Kockiin. by Rev. H. C. Langley 

Soquel b" Kev. G. Al. Dexter 



1887. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



279 



Sunol Glen, by Rev. O. <;. May. 
Tipton, by Rev. G. W. Trimble. 



$5 DO 
2 50 



1 25 

1 ou 



OREGON— $2.25. 

Portland, by Rev. L. Kelsey 

Mary D. kelsey 

WASHINGTON TERRITORY— $5T.90. 
Received by Rev. G. II. Atkinson: 

Mt. Pleasant $2 05 

Washougiii 2 T5 

D. Russell 2 00 

SO 

Cheney, Cong. Sunday-school children, 

bv Mrs. G. K. Andrus. 1 10 

Seattle, I'lvmouth Oh., to const. Oea. 
S. H. Foster a L. M., through Rev. C. 
C. Otis 50 00 

ENGLAND— $300.00. 

Euglaud, A Friend 300 00 

S WDWK'il [S LANDS— $250.00. 

Kohala, Hawaii, A Friend, by L. S. 
Ward, Treas 250 on 

HOME MISSIONARY 23(5 95 



$22,022 13 



Donations of Clothing, etc. 
Brooklyn, CortD., First Trinitarian Ch., 

by M. W. Crosby, box hymn books. 
Homer, N. Y., Ladies' Home Miss. Soc, 

by Ellen F. Phillips, barrel and freight. 
SunVld, Conn., Eloise C. Loomis, box 

books. 



51 85 



Receipts of the Massachusetts Home Missionary So- 
ciety, in August,REV. Edwin B. Palmer, Treas. 

Andover,VVest Parish, Mrs. H. L.Goodell. $5 00 

Bedford, by H. A. Gleasou 16 00 

N. H.. G. E. O., special for Indian 

Work 4 99 

Boston, A Friend, " T." special for Chil- 
dren's Bohemian Fund 20 00 

Mattapan, Miss M. E. Duncan l 00 

Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Edward Strong, by 

W. H. Cooley 30 00 

Roxbury, Immauuel, by Francis J. 

Ward 62 65 

Buckiand, by Chas. Howes 25 00 

Cambridge, Saepani, by Geo. S. Saun- 
ders 446 00 

Cherrvfleld, Me.,i>v J'hn W. Coffin 10 00 

Pain, by Rev. J. G. Willis 1 77 

Danvers, Maple St.,byEbeu Peabody... 137 33 

Sunday-school Class, by Eben Peabody. 10 oo 
Easthamptou, First, Sunday-school, by H. 

D. Brierley. for A. H. M. S 45 00 

Erving, Kev. Ira A. Smith 16 03 

Fail-haven, M. P. Shaw 5 00 

Falmouth, North, by Ward Eldridge 25 00 

Framingham, Plvmouth, by F. B. Howe.. 144 30 

South, South, by A. M. Eames 210 84 

Granby, Ch. of Christ, by Rev. P. F. 
Boyd, to const. Edward Thornton Clark 
and Harry Hortou Taylor L. Ms. of A. 

H. M. S 100 00 

Hatfield, by Alpheus Cowles, to const. C. 

L. Graves a L. M. of A. H. M. S 83 00 

Hingham, Evang., by ,1. o. Sanborn 30 77 

Holland. A Friend of Home Missions, by- 
Rev. S. Bixby ,...*. 5 00 

Lakeville and Taunton Precinct, Sunday- 
school, by C. F. Paull 9 40 

Lanesville, by Rev. F. H. Reed 20 00 

Leicester, Geo. H. Sprague 5 00 

Leominster, North, by Lucy E. Shedd '11 45 

Littleton, Anonymous, special for Ch. 

Bohemian Fund, bv. lames M. Gordon... 5 00 

Medford, Mystic, by F. H. Kidder 197 31 

Meriden, NT. U., by Rev. H. M. Holmes... 5 85 
Methuen, First Parish, by Jacob Emer- 
son 56 47 



Millbury, Second, by Ira N. Goddard $75 59 

Nah mi, Est. of Geo. Curtis, bv L. C. 

Waterman, trustee „ 5 000 00 

North BrooWeld, Onion, by Kev. J. \v. 

Ihrd, to const. I'arke J. Morse a L. M. 

B OtA.H. M.S 50 00 

PeekskilLN. Y 6 00 

Ojiincy, Primary S. S. Class, by Miss Mer- 
rill 5 50 

Reading, by S. (i. B. Pearson 25 00 

Rochester, North, by Kev. 8. B. Andrew. 2 45 
Rockland, by L. D. Perkins, for A. H. 

M- s 100 00 

Rutland, tor Rnfus M. Taft's service.--, by 

R- M- T !..' 1000 

Sandisfleld, by Rev. A. W. Field... , ; 20 

Waltbam, Trin., by Geo. 11. Whitford 40 is 

Warren, Est. of Francis B. Knowles, bv 

Henry A. Marsh, Ex ' 2 000 00 

Waverlcv. Mrs. Daniel Butler, to const ' 

Mrs. Emma M. Weed a L. M . . . 30 00 

West Boylston, First, by E. B. Rice. ! '.'." 17 75 
Westhauipton, Sunday- school, by N. A 

Kingsbury 2 r> 00 

Westminster, Y. P. S. C. E., by D. w. 

Hill 30 00 

West Stockinidge, Center, by Kev. Aug' 

Alvord 5 go 

Willianmburgh, Iowa, Welsh Cong. Ch.", 

by John Davis 5 25 

Home Missionary 2 87 

$9,203 46 

Donations of Clothing, etc., received and reported 
at tlie rooms of the Mass. Home Miss. Soc., in 
August. 

Everett, Ladies' Miss. Soc, by Elien M. 
Hill, box of clothing ' $40 00 

Somerset, by Miss A. L. Morrill, box of 
papers. 

Watertown, Phillips, Ladies' Sewing Cir- 
cle, by Mrs. M. Fuller, package (add'l). 6 00 

West Boylston, Ladies' Charitable Soc 
by Mrs. S. P. Hallock, box 45 77 

West Medway, Second, Ladies' fieri ev' 
Soc, by Sarah P. Clark, barrel and ft. '. 63 00 

$154 77 

Receipts of the Missic.ary Society of Connecticut 

in August, Ward W. Jacobs, Treas. 
Avon, West Avon, by S. F. Thompson.. $6 10 
Bridgeport, First, by Enoch P. Hincks.. 224 34 

Olivet, by Chas. A. Hawkins 14 on 

Canterbury, Westminster, Rev. and Mrs 
S. B. Carter, $5.00 ; by T. G. Clarke', 

S-i.OO 9 00 

Colchester, by S. E. Swift 115 27 

Columbia, by Samuel F. West '. 10 00 

Coventry, Second, by E. C. Chapman,' to 
const. H. Greeley Royal, of North Cov- 
entry, Ct.. a L. M 63 50 

Essex, Centerbrook, by Wm. Denison... 36 00 

Fairfle'.d, by O. B. Jennings 12 00 

Hartford, Asylum Hill, Rev. W. B. 

Moore ' 3s 91 

Hartland, West Hartland, by u. L. Wil- 
cox 12 3S 

Killiugly, Dauielsonville, by H. N. dem- 
ons, $40.00; by Mrs. Mary Dexter, 

$35.75; John Waldo, $20.00 95 75 

Litchfield, First, by F. D. McNeil .... S5 00 

Meriden Center, by Miss Mary A. Wood 25 00 
New London, Second, Trust Estate of 

Henrv P. Haven 100 00 

Norwalk, First, by E. C. Bissel] 40 00 

Norwich, Park, Wm. A. Slater .. 20 on 

Old Say brook, by Robert Chapman 39 53 

Orange, West Haven, by Wm. H. Tall- 
madge 66 68 



280 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



October, 1887. 



Plymouth, hy Arthur B^ardsley $41 00 

Salem, fo' Rev. Jairns Ordway a oo 

Sherman, bv M } Gelston 15 04 

Simsb iry, Tanffville, by Charles B. Hol- 

comb 138 29 

Stamfoul, Nonh Samtord, by W. B. 

Wr ed 20 40 

Thomastnn, by P. Darrow 15 17 

Eagle Hock, be C. F. Williams 10 00 

Tolland, by E. C. Chapman 36 55 

Veruon. Rockville, Sfcond, S. T. Noble 5 00 

Waterhurv, Second, bv B. G. Bryan 200 00 

West Hartford, Anson Chappell 10 00 

Winchester, by I. A. Bronson 6 20 

$1,513 01 



Receipts of the Illinois Home Missionary Society, 

in August, Aaron B. Mead, Treas. 
Amboy, Legacs of Elijah S. Parker, by 

Wm. B. Andruss $500 00 

Annawan 5 no 

Ashley, special 5 72 

Cnicag >, First 130 oo 

South, German 2 50 

DeKalb, special 9 01 

Donsjola, for pulpit supply 27 95 

Galesburgh, First 60 00 

Mrs. C. A. Tills'in, special 5 On 

Matt.oon, " Morning-Glory Buds" 2 50 

McLean lo oo 

Moline 87 67 

Nora, 19 00 

Normal 32 40 

Oak Park, Mrs. Elizabeth Durham 5 00 

Princeton, Mrs. S. G. Clapp 100 00 

Mrs. Rutus Carey 100 00 

Rose ville, special 5 12 

L. C. Axtell. for debt 4 no 

Jerome Pratt, special 1 00 

Shabbona, special 12 Oo 

Stark, special 10 41 

Summer Hill, Ladies' Miss. Soc 5 00 

Ullin, for pulpit supply 15 00 

Winnebago, Young Ladies' Soc 9 00 

AFriend l oo 

Rev. C. H. Morse 2 00 

Rev. A. Ethridge, special 20 00 

Thomasboro, "R.'* 4 07 



$1,190 35 



Receipts of the Wisconsin Home Missionary So- 
ciety, in June, R. A. McCULLOUGH, Treas. 

Antigo, S. S $11 on 

Alde.ly 7 50 

Arena, W. H. M. S 1 61 

Baraboo, Miss A. B. Clark 10 00 

Berlin, S. S 10 00 

W. H. M. S 5 00 

Black Earth, s. S 4 00 

Brodhead 3 25 

Bloomer, Sunbeam Soc 5 00 

L. M. Soc 190 

Clinronville, S. S 12 00 

Depern, s. s 10 on 

Evangelistic Service, G. W. Nelson 8 66 

Eau Claire, First 50 00 

Eagle River. S. S 6 67 

Elroy, Y'oung People 12 25 

Church , 40 

Fond du Lac, S. S 15 00 

Fox Lake 20 00 

Fort Howard, S. S 6 20 

Grand Rapids, S. S 10 00 

Y. P. S. C. E 2 00 

GeDesee, S. S : . 5 00 

Hay ward, S.S 6 00 

Kaukauna, S.S 2 10 

Leeds 22 80 

Lase Mills 50 00 

Milwaukee, Grand Ave 48 95 

W. H. M.S 6 00 



Mukwanago, Cong. Ch $n oo 

Moudovi, Cong. Ch io no 

.8. S '. 2 00 

Mena«ha 25 30 

L.H. M.S .....!.! 12 15 

New Richmond 55 00 

One who loves the Rtdeemer's cause..." 5 00 

Oshkosh, Welsn 5 oo 

G. M. Williamson ..." 10 00 

Plymouth, S. s 400 

Pewaukee, S. S 409 

Peshtigo ....; 10 55 

Randolph, Welsh Cong. Ch 13 02 

Royalton 12 60 

S. S 6 00 

Rioon 23 50 

Roberts, S. S 3 10 

Racine, Welsh 1 68 

River Falls, infant class 6 09 

Sheboygan, S. S 20 00 

Sparta, W. H. M. S 10 70 

Windsor 22 20 

S- « 7 80 

Union Grove, S. S 5 00 

L. Aid and Miss. Soc 8 00 



Receipts of the Wisconsin Home Missionary Society, 

in July, R. A. McCULLOUGH, Treas. 

ADplHon, $60; S. S., $25 $85 00 

Arena, First 5 00 

Auroraville 5 00 

Beloit, First, $48.75; W. fl. M. S., $18.65. 67 40 

Berlin 20 00 

Black Earth 7 00 

Blake's Prairie, S. S 2 10 

Bloomingtou 3 n 

Boscobel. $6.35; S. S., $2.75 9 10 

Brodhead, $1.71; W. H. M.S., $4.90 6 61 

Clinton, $28.08; Y. P. S. C. E.,$2.65 30 63 

Oelavan, W. H. M. S 10 14 

Eau Claire, First, S. S., $3u.0n; Rev. Chas. 

W. Pavne, $5 35 00 

Evansville 30 00 

Fond du Lac 32 l>0 

Footville 10 00 

Fort Atkinson, S. S 2 00 

Fox Lake, S. S 10 00 

Fulton 2 00 

Green Bay, Pres., Y. L. M. S 10 00 

Hartland 13 00 

Hixton 8 00 

Kaukauna, $21.50; S. S., $5.50 27 00 

Kenosha 120 00 

Kinnikinnick 6 68 

La Crosse, Geo. H. Ray eo 00 

Lake Geneva 20 00 

Madison, $42.26; W. fl. M. S., $14.52 56 80 

Menomonie 30 00 

Metomen 8 00 

Milwaukee, Hanover St 16 00 

Welsh 3 91 

Necedah, s. S 5 68 

New Chester 10 00 

Oshkosh, Miss Lucy Bartlett, $25; A. H. 

Bartlett, tio 35 00 

Peshtigo,$3; H. C. Todd, $10 13 00 

Pine River 11 50 

Pittsville, $10; S. S.,$5 15 00 

Prairie du Chien, $4.33; S. S., $4.42; Rev. 

J. Porter, $25 33 75 

River Falht, S. S 6 09 

Roberts 25 00 

Rochester, S.S 5 00 

Shopiere, S. S 5 00 

Sparta, $31.19; S. S., $15.67 96 86 

Sturtreon Bay 10 00 

Trempealeau, $10.05; S.S.,$2.25 12 30 

Viroqua, S.S 3 00 

Wauwatosa, $10.05 ; S. S. , $25 35 05 

Whitewater, $M'3.14; S. S., $23.54 126 68 

Whitewater, J. W. Dennison 5 00 

Wyoming 5 75 

L. H. M. S 3 30 



THE HOME MI8SIONAKT. 



Missionaries 



A. IX. M. S. 

Mav now have a tirst-dasi Hewing Machiru 
without paving ihe usual prices charged b\ 
Manufacturers anil their agents. 

Anv mis a ionary in tn<* service (>• the A. H. M. 8. 
cau, bv sending an or.ler on the Society for th> 
amount, meive a Sew>ng Macune as showi 
below at 6J per cent, discount off the price* 
stated, and can let me pavmpnts be made at th- 
rate nf$v>.no per m^nth If thpy so d sire. Or 1< 
per cent, former discount will be allowed If th< 
full amount is paid in cash on delivery oi 
machine. Head tne lollowine "ad." and senr 
for an illustrated catalogue, which will give full 
particulars. 

No. 1 $45.00 No. 4 $60.0". 

No. 2 5".00 No. 5 5T.50. 

No. 3 55.' Mo. 6 65.00. 



A V JBY 




New improved high arm, new mechanical princi- 
ples and rot rv movements, automatic, direct and 
perfect action ,Tvlindfr shuttle, self-setting needle, 
por-iti.e feed, lio springs, few parts, minimum 
weight, no friction, no noise, no wear, no fatigue, 
no "lanirums," capacity nulimited, always in or- 
der, richly _ ornament", d, nichel platf d, and gives 
perfect satisfaction, hend for circulars. Adores*. 

THE AVERY SEWING MACHINE AGENCY, 
A.ALFOltD, Pres't. 
7T Chambers St., New York. P. O. Box i!002. 
[From Rev. L. H. Cobb, D.D., Sec. A. C. U. Church- 
Building Quarterly.] 
MISSIONARY SEWING-MACHINES. 
Our missionary readers will take special interest 
in reading our ad. of the " Avery Sewing-Machine." 
A Christian man has taken an interest in making 
the very easy terms found in the ad. for the parties 
named. There is no trick in the offer— no deception 
n the machine. The backer is sn acquaintance of 
ours, and we can assure purchasers that what he 
says can be relied upon. Several missionaries have 
availed themselves of this offer, and have written 
in the strongest terms of their satisfaction. It is 
undoubtedly ons of the best machines made. 




WHY DO MOTHERS 

■ ID Put stiff corsets on their 
Children? Dc 

FERRIS' 



Put stiff corsets on their 
v-in« Children f Don't do it, but 



PATENT 

GOOD 

SENSE 




IC0RSET WAISTS 

[Fit nil ascs. 
All Physicians 
ecommend them.' 

LEADING 
RETAILERS 

•everywhere sell them.l 

FERRIS BROS. 

Manufacturers, 841 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 

MARSHALL FIELD & CO. CHICAGO, 

H 1IOJ.I CHALK WK8TEKS AGENTS. ' 

GLENTONH.MENEELYBELLCO. 

TROY, NEW YORK, 

Manufacture Superior 

CHURCH and SCHOOL BELLS. 



Cincinnati bellFoundry Go 



SUCCESSORS IN' BLYMYER BELLS TO THE 

"BLYMYER MANUFACTURING CO 

CATALOGUE WITH 1800 TESTIMONIALS. 



sfflELLS.CHURCH.SCHOOL.FIRE ALARM 



NOTICE 



TO 



iimtiun. 

All letters, orders or com- 
munications in reference to 
advertising in The Home 
Missionary, should be ad- 
dressed to H. S. Chandler, 
Advertising Manager, No. 251 
Broadway, New York. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 



THE "MANHATTAN" 

OF NEW YORK, 

156 and 158 B roadwmj, 

"AH men think all men mortal but themselves," but there is nothing like a spell 
e siekiiefl. to shake one's confidence in the stability of his health and the permanency of 
physical life. We seem somehow to entertain (vaguely, it may be) the idea that an 

ZH r h aD °TH may ^ VeryPr0Pe / ly8afe,y d6ferred UDtil there are ^emonitions of declining 
health. This u hke waiting for a fire to occur in your neighborhood and then running to 
seek fire insurance when the conflagration is threatening your own house. It is too \2 
then to get msurance. The bitter reflection: "It might have been." may then be timely 
enough ; but wishes have no power on that day to evoke from the ashes the presence of the 
protective policy to restore the property lost by our folly. 

Take insurance on your life «ow. The new plan of' the Manhattan will not only cover 
the contingency of death, but be a saving fund for yourself, to be resorted to in your ad- 
▼anced age. ' 

JAMES M. McLEAN, President. 

J. L, HALSEY, 1st Vice-Prest. H. B. STOKES, 2d Vice-Prest, 
H. Y. WEMPLE, Secretary. g. N. STEBBINS, Actuary. 

correspond with the company direct. ""nws, xowa, and Mifcsoun are invited to 

THE INDEPENDENT. 

The Largest, The Ablest, The Best Religious and 
Literary Newspaper in the World. 



" One of the Ablest Weeklies in existence. -Pall Mall Gazette, 
London, England. 

"The most Influential Religious Organ in the States."— The Spec- 
tator, London, England. 

« Clearly stands at the Forefront as a weekly Religious Magazine.'" 
—Sunday-School Times, Philadelphia, Penn 



THE HOME MISSIONAKT. 



IT IS A 



Religious, Literary, Educational, Art, 
Story, Financial, Insurance, Scientific, 
Political Agricultural, Sunday-school 

NEWSPAPER. 

It has more and abler Contributors than any three of its contemporaries. It 
stands in the front rank of journalism, and every person of intelligence should 
read it. 

TERMS OF SURSCR1PTI0N. 

One Month $ 30 One Year $3 00 

Three Months 75 Two Years 5 00 

Four Months 100 Three Years 7 00 

Six Months 1 50 Four Years 8 50 

NineMonths 2 25 Five Years 10 00 

Send Postal Card for a Free Sample Copy, and Clubbing List if you wish to 
subscribe for any Magazines or other Newspapers at less than Publishers' Prices. 

THE INDEPENDENT, 251 Broadway, New York. 



THE HOME MISSIONABY. 



THE 



UNITED STATES 

Life Insurance Company, 

IIV THE CITY OE IVE^W YORK. 
(Organized in 1850.) 

261, 262 and 263 BROADWAY 

New York, 



OEO. H. BURFORD, President. 
O. I*. FBALEIGH, Secretary. 

A. WHEELWRIGHT, Ass't Sec. 



All Policies henceforth issued are incontestable for any cause 
after three years. 

Death Claims paid at once as soon as satisfactory proofs are 
received at the Home Office. 

Absolute Security, combined with the largest liberality, assures 
the popularity and success of this Company. 



ALL FORMS OF TONTINE POLICIES ISSUED 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 

This Monthly is furnish, a. sixty c*,ts a ye*r, postage paid. The BubscrJpUon price could 
not well be less Its whole present Issueshould go to actual subscribers. But, unless thej prefe 

Society and Its Auxiliaries; Ministers securing a yearly collection tor It in Odi ' « " ; 

ateo, to every individual, Association, or Congregation, one copy /or awry ten *|^™™ a ™, 
„ :li( , 0V e r ro the Society or a. Auxiliary. Suitable names should accompany the >-IJ^* *' 
tors are earnestly requested to serve HomeMlssSms by promoting the use of this Journal at tne 
ttonthly Concen and among their people. 

immediate notice of the discontinuance or change ol post-office address should be given. 



APPLICATIONS FOR AID. 

Congregations desiring aid should apply.^ once afterlnnding a minister. They should make 
Cull statement of the facts in their condition and prospects which Justify on . application, iney 
M ould also give these particulars, viz. : 

Population of the place. 

Nanus oi the church or churches, and preaching stations. 

Number of church-members. 

Average of congregation. 

Denomination and size of contiguous congregations. 

Names and distances of the nearesl Congregational churches. 

Minister's full name and post-office address: Town, County, State. 

Dors he reside on his fleld of labor? Is he installed pastor? 

Has he any other calling than that of the ministry? 

Of what local church is he a member? 

Of what Ministerial Association? 

The number of persons composing his family. 

Total amount of salary proposed. 

Amount pledged by the pecple and how secured. 

Has he, also, the use of a parsonage? 

Is aid expected from any other source? 

["he least amount thai will suffice from the A. N. M. 8. 

The amount received from this Society last year. 

Will less probably be needed next year? 

Amount contributed to the Society last year. How raised. 

Amount contributed to other benevolent societies. 

Additional statements concerning the condition, prospects, and wants of the held. 

Date of the desired commission. 
The application must be signed by the officers of the church, where there is one, and by the 
trustees or a committee of the congregation. 

If the ecclesiastical body, within whose limits the congregation is found, has a ConranUee 
of Missions," the members of that Committee should certify these statements, the standing ol tne 
minister, his prospects of usefulness there, and indorse the application. If no such "committee 
of Missions" exists, the application should be indorsed by two or more neighboring clergymen 
acquainted with the facts. If no church cr congregation is yet gathered, applicants will follow 
tin same ei m>c as far as practicable. 

Applications, after being so indorsed, should be sent to the Superintendent (or Secretary of the 
Auxiliary) for the region where the applicants reside. 

Appropriations, as a rule, bear the date ol a punctual application; and they never coyer 
mors than one year. If further aid be needed, a new application is required, containing all the 
particulars named above, and indorsed as before. Tn this the certificate of (fee missionary that the 
congregation has fulfilled its j i eriows pledQi e for his s«] poi t. must be added. 

For the address of Superintendents and Secretaries of Auxiliaries,' see p. 4 of cover. 



FORM OF A BEQUEST. 

I bequeath to my executors the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay over the same 

af-er my decease, to the person who, when the same is payable, shall act 

as Treasurer of the American Home Missionary Society, formed in the City of New York, in the 

year eighteen hundred and twenty-six, to be applied to the charitable use3 and purposes of said 

Society, and under its direction. 



OCTOBEK, 1«»?, 

AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY; 

Bible House, Astor Place, New York. 

Rev. DAVID R. COE, D.D., Honorary Secretary. 
Rev. WALTER M. BARROWS, D.D.. / „ , . . ' 

Rev. JOSEPH B. CLARK, D.D., ^ Secretaries for Correspondence. 

Rev. ALEXANDER H. CLAPP, D.D., Treasurer. 

ExEcrriVK COMMITTEE:— Mb. JOHN WILEY, Chairman; MR. WM. HENRY SMITH; Rev. WH M 
TAYLOR, D.D.; Mk .CHARLES H. PARSONS; Mr. ALFRED S. BARNES ; Mr. ALBERT WOODRUFF 
GEO. P.SHELDON, ESQ.; Rev. JAMES D. ROBERTS, D.D.; Rev. SAMUEL H. VIKGIN, D.D.- Mr 
HERBERT M. DIXON; Rev. A. J. F. BEHRENDS, D.D.; Rev. ROBEKT R. MEREDITH, D D- Mr 
FRANCIS FLINT; WM. IVES WASHBURN, "Esq., Recording Secretary. 

COMMUNICATIONS 
Relating to the general business of the Society may be addressed to either of the Secretaries for corre- 
spondence. 
Communications relating to the Woman's Department may be addressed to The Officers of the A B. M. s., 

Bible House, N. Y. 
Communications relating to the Editorial Department of The Home Missionary, may be addressed to 

« Mrs. H. 8. Caswell, Bible House, N. Y. 

DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS 
In Drafts, Clucks, Registered Letters, or Fort-Office Orders; also Communications relating to the business 
matters of Thb Home missionary and other Publications of the Society, may be addressed to \ii.Vr 
II. CLAPP, Treasurer, Bible House, Astor Place, New York. 
Post-Office Orders should be drawn on STATION D, New York City. 

A Payment of $30 Constitute* a Life Member. 

SUPERINTENDENTS. 

Re/. Henry A. Schauefler, Work among Bohemians, Poles, etc., Cleveland, o 

Rev. MoritzE. Eversz, Work among Germans, Chicago, 111. 

Kev. M. \Y. Montgomery, Work anions Scandinavian?, Minneapolis, Minn 

Rev. Leroy Warren Lansing, Micb. Rev. John L. Maile. Omaha Nni, 

vV' « D £-n- CURTIS Indianapolis, Ind. Rev. Hiram D. Wiard! Mitchell' Dak 

5f £• T - ]{ ft*"!" ; Jacksonville, Fla. Rev. H. C. Simmons.. . Fargo No Dak' 

Rev. Ad DI son Blanchard./;;;;- \Vope°k U a 'Kan. , J.'h. WarrKS: ^tfrl&o^ 

Bo _ _ _ New Mexico. Rev. James T. Ford Los AWeie°' rt\ 

Rev. C. C. Otis Seattle, Wash. Ter. ' G. H. Atkinson, D.D. .' Poitlanri Or 

Rev. Geo. A. Hood, Ashland, Wis. -Portland, Or. 



SECRETARIES AND TREASURERS 
OF THH AUXILIARIES. 

fZZxTM^Y^^lT^ Maine Missionary Society Bangor, Me. 

ffi !YM^^Tl^^s^eP et ^ :::: ^''' "&>*** B^MXjKpSSjft. H. 

Tls. SKS^fgS^^ :; saw-* 

J^^Iar^ :: :: ^r|» L 

W^D^^ic^sS^Tr^u 1 ^^ ! ! ! ! : : ! : ! ! ! ! "*">«»* S °V «"•**** jKffifri. 1 
BMfifS^P.'KSS?' D - D - V *^-" '>«» Ten* Home Miss. Society. . . :g5S8 Ty. 



Rev. J. G. FRASER, Secretary. . Ohio 

AL EX'R H. CLAPP, Treasurer . ' 

Rey. JAMES TOMPKINS, Secretary Tllinoin 

AARON B. MEAD, Esq.. Treasurer nnmn* 

Km T, G! GfKASSm Secretin * Tr , .,,.,., 

R. A. McCOI LOUGH, Esq. , Treasurer tSCOWOTn 

Rev. T. O. DOUGLASS, Secretary.. /,,„■.-, 

J. H. MERRILL, Esq., Treasurer ...'...'..'.' .'.'.'.'.'.".' 



New Y'ork C'it v. 
...Cleveland, Oiiiii. 
..New York City. 
. l_ 151 Washington St., 
./ Chicago, Illinois. 
...Milwaukee, Wis. 
...Milwaukee, Wis. 
.. Grinnell, Iowa. 
. . . Des Moines, Iowa. 



/ 



2 



&2^<JL Kptr; 



THE 



Home Missionary. 



NOVEMBEli. 1887, 



CONTEXTS. 



TO THE FRIENDS OF HOME MIS- 
SIONS 281 

P CORRECTION 282 

A LIVE GOSPEL 282 

A PC S !'.'. L 282 

A QUtiS FION 283 

IX THE SAME BOAT 2S3 

WII V DC WE LOVE OUR COUNTRY? 285 

Villi II .-HALL IT BE? 288 

GIVING AN OPPORTUNITY TO 

GIVE 288 

AMONG THE DANES IN CONNEC- 
TICUT 290 

" TH E NEW NORTH " 292 

TO A BOSTON LADY 297 

A SEQUEL 298 

CLEANSING FIRES 298 

REV. HORACE LYMAN 299 



PERSECUTION IN MASSACHU- 
SETTS 300 

S70MAN'S DEPARTMENT 301 

The Paper Mission and What Cams 

of It 302 

OUR YOUNG PEOPLE 308 

Questions 309 

The Young Men's Missionary Associa- 
tion, Amherst. Mass 310 

The Work at Hand. -VI 311 

AMERICAN COLLEGE AND EDU- 
CATION SOCIETY 313 

CHILDREN'S BOHEMIAN FUND.... 314 

MISSIONARY BOXES 314 

WOMAN'S STATE HOME MISSION- 
ARY ORGANIZATIONS : . 315 

APPOINTMENTS 315 

RECEIPTS 316 



Vol. LX. No. 7. 



NEW YOKK. 

AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Bible Hoctse, Astou Place. 



SIXTY CENTS A YEAR, IN ADVANCE, P03TAGE PAID. 



THE HOME MISSIONARY. 

Go Preach the Gospel Mark xvi. 15. 

How shall they preach except they be sent ? Horn, x. 15. 

VOL. LX. NOVEMBER, 1887. No. 7. 



TO THE FRIENDS OF HOME MISSIONS. 

The recaipt3 of the American. Home Missionary Society from Lega- 
cies suddenly fell, lash year, from an annual average of almost $116,000 
for the five previous years, to $66,800. Chiefly on this account, the 
Society found itself, at the close of its sixty-first year, entering with an 
empty treasury on the dry summer months with their small receipts 
and large dues to the missionaries. The Legacies were (and they still 
are) decreasing; To avoid threatening embarrassment, the Executive 
Committee felt obliged — in the face of plainest providential calls to a 
large advance in the work — to reduce by $25,000 their intended appor- 
tionment for the present year. In justice to the workers at the front, 
the Society, at its annual meeting last June, voted that the officers 
borrow money at the banks and pay the missionaries promptly. By 
compliance with this vote the Society is now indebted to the banks for 
loans amounting to $75,000. The banks suggest that this is as far as 
they' care to go in these times of financial stringency. The Executive 
Committee and Officers do not think it wise to incur a larger debt. 
They believe that the churches will agree with them in this. 

The summer months are over. Pastors and people are now getting 
into their regular work. That of the Society knows no rest. Its 
daily maturing claims for work taken up in the name of the Congrega- 
tional churches call for $1,000 a day. Over and above this is this 
seventy-five-thousand-dollar debt to be provided for. Notes at the 
bank amounting to $25,000 mature in less than a month. They must 
be met, unless the Society's credit is to suffer. The credit of the 
Society means the credit of the Congregational churches that act 
through it. Shall these notes, given to carry on your work, be paid at 
maturity, or shall they go to protest? 

The Officers were told to trust the churches. They have trusted 



282 the home missionary. November. 

and are trusting them. But the banks do not know, and cannot reach 
the churches. Neither can the missionaries. Both trust the Society, 
and look to it for their dues. Will the churches come now to the